this might be a dumb butter question

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cookinwthflame, Sep 17, 2012.

  1. cookinwthflame

    cookinwthflame

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    So this might be stupid but is there a difference between melted butter and clarified butter?
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Yes, melted butter is just that, butterfat, water, and milk solids, approximately 80% butterfat, 17-19 % water, and 1-3% milk solids

    Clarified butter is only butterfat, 100%
     
     
  3. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    Just to add, it's enough to make, for sure, but also you can buy it as Ghee in a most Asian markets too, just an fyi.
     
  4. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    And the taste; ghee / clarified butter has a somewhat nutty taste.

    Petals
     
  5. cookinwthflame

    cookinwthflame

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    Thanx for the answers but now I'm alittle confused. So is clarified butter just normal butter slowlyheated and reduced down or is it a different kind of product?
     
  6. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    It's normal butter heated and reduced to remove some of the water and with the milk solids that sink to the bottom of the pan removed from the final product.
     
  7. 808jono202

    808jono202

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    It is normal butter, heated until it break, and the milk parts foam. Take off heat. If you pour it in a clear container, you will see that it separates into three parts basically: Milky liquids on the bottom, the clarified utter, and any film on top is just what "impurities/solids" have cooked and stayed up top. Skim the top, and pour/ladle out the middle section for clarified butter(BUTTER containing non of the milk solids).

    All you are doing, is removing the milk solids, it's no big deal.

    Leaving butter "whole", like for a burre blanc, is simply mixing in the butter to a base sauce/sweated aromatics, and adding whole butter, while whisking constantly, so the butter does NOT break, and so the butter remains whole, and stays as a "sauce".

    If you reduce butter down, no frills, you end up with Browned Butter, a great addition in it's self, especially for cauliflower, rainbow trout/fresh water fish, pasta/ especially gnocchi. Or, when making caramel for sauce, it adds some earthiness to it that pairs well with coffee, dark chocolate, and even (other end of the spectrum)pralines and desserts like Paris Brest. 

    You reduce it down FURTHER. . . .you end up with burn butter, good for nothing more than making the house smell pretty good for a bit.
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2012
  8. cookinwthflame

    cookinwthflame

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    Wow never knew there was so much to butter 808jon thanx. Funny thing is that all this started with a simple question that a friend asked me while drinking beer in the garage, I thought I knew the answer. Turns out I was right but totally by chance because I truly didn't know there was that much to it.not that its complicated just didn't know the whole story thanx again everyone