Thin Crust or Deep Dish

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I'm not interested in books, they don't taste very good in my opinion.  But I will take recommendations on pizza joints in NYC aside from Patsy's and Grimaldi's which have the best pizza NY can offer.  I never said they were the best (or the first) in the world but when I get a craving they satisfy deliciously. 
 
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I with you Koukouvagia on the Patsys and Grimaldis. I grew up eating the original Patsys, lived 3 blocks away until we moved a little further downtown but we still went to Patsys for our pizza. Now living 1600 miles away in what we consider a pizza wasteland we make do with some I make here at home. Now the family loves what I make so much they don't dream of Patsys every night anymore. I found a small high heat oven that goes to 800 and it cranks out some great pies, great charring on the crust in under 2 minutes. It is very possible to make a great pizza at home, just takes time to find a dough you are happy with and time to let the stone in a regular oven heat up enough if you don't have access to a high heat pizza oven. No need for anyone to eat inferior pizza if they love to cook and are willing to spend the time experimenting.
 
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 I like all pizza. That includes deep dish and yes it really is pizza. It's been a while since I looked at this but  IIR deep dish pizza has historical ties to sicily.  
I think we need to clarify a few things about Pizza style. Chicago style pizza is NOT all deep dish. Not by a long shot. Chicago style pie is either deep dish which is exactly as it sounds with a single deep crust. However a LOT of Chicago pies are stuffed which have two crusts. You can be pretty darn sure the majority there consider both pizza but I think there may have been a few feuds over which is "best". Who really cares? I'm an equal opportunity pizza pie muncher. LOL
To add to the mix Detroit style is a square deep dish with thick doughy crust and the sauce on top. Detroit style pie is cut in squares. I've never seen Chicago pie cut in squares (Detroit envy?). If any one here makes it to Chicago do yourself a favor and adopt the when in Rome theory of Pizza. Over looking Lou Malnati's, Ginos East or Giordanos would be a mistake if for no other reason then to get a taste of the local flavor.
In Detroit Cloverleaf is tops but we have a new contender here called Dangood that is making a sort of hybrid Chicago pie. It has a more traditional moist crust but is thick like Chicago style. Luckily we now have some killer thin crust joints using coal fired ovens as well. Supinos down at the Eastern Market.......sigh. 
Now is that really beer in your glass or is it........./img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
 
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The Sicilian-style is a thick flatbread---sort of like a foccacia---bottom crust only. It has no relationship to the Chicago deep dish style, which is a pressed dough that goes up the sides as well as covering the bottom. And, yes, Sicilian is traditionally cut in squares.

I wonder if that's where the Midwestern habit of cutting thin-crust pizza into little squares comes from?

As to the stuffed pizzas, I always think of them as a calzone variation. Again, we're not talking about taste here, but, rather, nomenclature. I've eaten some really good deep dish examples, and some fantastic stuffed ones. I just have trouble attaching the word "pizza" to them.
 
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I've seen the Sicily reference in a few articles about Detroit style pie so it could indeed be the squares. I always thought it was also about the sauce being on top of the cheese as well. The crust here is indeed thicker and more similar to foccacia than thin crust pie.
For me the only note worthy distinction with stuffed Vs deep dish is just separating the two beasts. Many seem to think Chi-town pie is strictly one or the other but both are associated with Chicago and very traditional there. 
I would disagree slightly on the crust in that not all Chicago pies have the pressed crust which results in a very dense dry dough, although many do use that method. That type of crust is certainly not my favorite. A Calzone is a totally different animal to me but hey it's all good... Literally!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif
 
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but hey it's all good... Literally!  


I keep trying to convince myself that it's not. Pizza in any form is tasteless, empty bulk, with no value whatsoever.

But, as the shape of my belly attests, I haven't convinced anyone, least of all me. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
 
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 I have accepted the fact that I'm short, fat and bald. A little pizza won't hurt.    /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
 
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I'm not interested in books, they don't taste very good in my opinion.  But I will take recommendations on pizza joints in NYC aside from Patsy's and Grimaldi's which have the best pizza NY can offer.  I never said they were the best (or the first) in the world but when I get a craving they satisfy deliciously. 
 
Sloman's book (The Pizza Book) is filled with great recommendations about pizza places in NYC - and elsewhere.  She includes the history of many places, and an excellent overview of pizza in the US, from its introduction to contemporary times.  She also notes, in many instances, the type of ovens and the cooking techniques used in many places, all of which adds to the possibiliuty of finding a place that you'll enjoy.  Of course, there are recipes for various crusts, tool suggestions, and a great photo of Evelyn when she was younger, before sampling all that pizza.  For those who are interested, check out The Legends of Pizza blog and interviews on the subject of pizza by Evelyn and others.
 
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Look at it this way, Duckfat. Pizza helps keeps you in shape.

Round is a shape, ain't it. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lookaround.gif
 
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Being born and raised in Westchester NY and Fairfield county CT I will have to go with the NY style of pizza and love it. I have been to Chicago many of times and had plenty of deep dish pizza and that is good too but you can't really grab a slice of deep dish and eat it on the go like a NY slice of pizza. Living in Seattle for the last 7 years ummmm there is no such thing as pizza....well they call it pizza but I don't agree.
 
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nothing wrong with mixing it up. both are delicious. but in my opinion you cat beat a yummy thin crispy base with simple toppings cooked in a stone oven!

yum!!
 
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Not at all, Gunnar. We weren't discussing the shape of the pizza, but the effect it can have on the human body, especially on those of us who make pigs....uh, that is, overindulge. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
 
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lol, the basic shapes for the human body...apple, pear ...and banana i think but whatever/img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif
 
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1983 Naples Italy and I found myself in a little place with I believe a wood burning oven.  I had a pepsi and a pizza that fit a regular sized dinner plate.  You start by cutting a small triangular piece which you then dip into the wonderful oil that pooled in the center.  Thereafter you just pull off pieces around the edges and dip.  Fold the remainder together and eat.  Oh my, the flavor.

Had lots of good pizza since; but never had one like Naples since.  I'd travel a reasonable distance from Chat-town for that one.
 
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