Thin Crust or Deep Dish

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Mar 18, 2010.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I was recently watching a television programming comparing and contrasting NY-style thin crust pizza with Chicago's deep dish.  I've never thought about it much before but I realize now that I am a die-hard supporter of thin crust.

    How about you?
     
  2. maryb

    maryb

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    Thin cracker style crust, not that floppy NY stuff.
     
  3. gunnar

    gunnar

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    I like both, but i mainly just get a California style,, it's a bit thicker then NY style and thinner then Chicago, but all the local places make it that way. All the good deep dish places are nowhere near my house, the same really for a REAL NY crust, so its a treat.
     
  4. andy mckelvay

    andy mckelvay

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    Well they've been doing it thin and crispy in italy since the 18th century, and they've been making 'pizza' since 997 AD. =)

    In Italy it's often made with doppio zero, or a mix of normal flour and 00, so it seems to suit thin and crispy a lot more too.
     
  5. canadiandot

    canadiandot

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    Pizza? Yes please!
     
  6. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Bagel dough makes for very good pizza.  You'd be surprised.  Or not.

    BDL
     
  7. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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         Being from the Chicago area...I could never give up stuffed.  But I do prefer a nice thin/crispy crust for "normal" pizza eating.  The NY floppy thin crust isn't that appealing to me.

      dan
     
  8. canadiandot

    canadiandot

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    Boar, I'll have to tell my DH that. He makes our bread-type items, including bagels and pizza crusts...
     
  9. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    I saw that show, KK, and laughed my way through it.

    Having spent ten long years in the greater Chicago area I can understand their fascination with deep dish. What they call regular pizza is why. Actually, as another expat explained, my problem was thinking of it as pizza. "If you think of it as cardboard with a little sauce and some cheese," he said, "then it ain't bad."

    They even cut it in little squares, rather than hefty wedges. Maybe they think pizza is supposed to be some sort of a canape?

    That aside, there's really no argument. When made well, deep dish is very tasty, and can make for a deeply satisfying meal. But it most empatically is not pizza. It's a savory tart or single-crust pie. 

    Pizza, anywhere else, is a flatbread with toppings, baked under very high heat. There is no side-crust, as there is with deep-dish. And pizza dough is stretched, which is what gives it its particular structure. Deep dish dough is merely pressed into the bottom and sides, and is merely a bread-like crust.

    What I'm saying is that the whole thing is a non-argument, because you're talking apples and oranges.
     
  10. gunnar

    gunnar

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    I like both, Oranges just don't have the crunch that an Apple has and no way you can do fresh squeezed like you can an Orange, plus when you peel an Apple it's not naturally segmented. Course when you peel an Apple it doesn't try to spit citrus juice in your eye either/img/vbsmilies/smilies/tongue.gif
     
  11. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Exactly, Gunnar. They're both good. But if you call the orange colored one an "apple" you'll just confuse everyone.

    And that's the point. As I said, deep-dish is a lot of things. But pizza ain't one of them.
     
  12. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Thin crust or deep dish?  I'll say yes.

    In general I make thinner, crispy crusts with sparse toppings, maybe 2 or 3 items other than cheese and sauce.  And the sauce could be quite understated, shall we say.  But every now and then I like a thick, monstrous slab of gooey goodness dripping down the front of my shirt.

    When you cook chicken, do you cook it *exactly* the same way *every* time?

    mjb.
     
  13. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    Teamfat, you're describing the difference, or one of the differences, between thin- and thick-crust pizza. Neither of them are the same as Chicago deep-dish.

    To make one of those, basically you take a deep baking dish or casserole. Make your dough and press it down so the bottom and sides are covered---just like making a tart, except you don't roll the dough. Then start layering the filling: sausages, and chop meat, and cheses, and sauce, and.....whatever your heart desires. Then bake until done.

    Imagine if you built a lasagne inside a pie shell, but without the noodle layers. Essentially that's what a deep-dish "pizza" is.
     
  14. dc sunshine

    dc sunshine

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    Have never had a "pizza" Chicago style - not sure I like the concept.  To deep, too much dough.  Different strokes for different folks.  I love a crispy base, firm, thin crust pizza.

    Doesn't need a heap of ingredients, just a tasty mixing of simple items.  That does it for me. None of the cheese stuffed crust with way too much dough and too many ingredients.

    Yes, this is a purist talking here.  That's just my preference and I really cannot comment on the other sort.  BTW, my father (ok I am biased) is the best pizza maker I know.  Cuz I grew up with it I guess. And he is Irish/English. Starts it right from scratch.  Tasty.
     
  15. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    For what it's worth I'm not a fan of the typical ny-pizza by the slice.  They pre-bake large cheese pizzas and then when you order a slice they put your toppings on it and warm it up in the oven.  It's a bit floppy and droopy and the sauce is never very good, along with fake mozzeralla cheese.


    Patsy's on the other hand is the real deal.  My mouth waters when I pass Patsy's on the street.

    I agree that deep-dish is not really pizza but rather a pie.  It's very heavy and filling but I don't like the bread texture of it and the over abundance of filling (I can't consider that toppings).

    Siduri, is there any other kind of pizza going on in Italy?  The parts I've visited only offered the wonderful cookie-thin crust but I hear there are other regions that have thick crust.
     
  16. andy mckelvay

    andy mckelvay

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    Supposedly Neapolitan pizza can be thicker than Roman style pizza (which is invariably thin and crispy), but it always seems a lot thinner and crispier than the stuff we're used to the in the US and UK.

    Outside of pizzerias they do Pizza rustica or Pizza al taglio, which are baked in deep trays and cut up into slices for a quick takeaway snack. - They seem to sell Calzone in most of those places too.

    Rustica and al taglio are the closest things to deep dish, which is why I don't like em much. =)
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  17. mikelm

    mikelm

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    As a more-than-thirty-year (God help me) Chicago resident ... like, tomorrow's the First Day of Spring and we're expecting a blizzard... I cannot get very interested in the famous Chicago Deep Dish  pizza.   It's basically a loaf of bread smothered in goopy toppings.

    But, when my daughter visits from Pittsburgh, we have to go to Giordano's for a Deep Dish Spinach and Garlic pizza.  Well, it ain't terrible, but only the garlic saves it.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif

    I took a cooking lesson some years ago from Tony Mantuano, the highly-acclaimed chef/owner of Spiagga - a lot of foodies consider it the best Italian restaurent in the city -  and he taught us a whole-wheat thin crust pizza recipe that I use when doing my own.  It's crisp like a cracker, and it's what I want under my pizza.

    I'm not a very good Chicagoan, pizza-wise.

    Mike
     
  18. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    While, technically, Chicago Deep Dish might not be "pizza" lets drop the semantics.  We call lots things by names that they really aren't.  Look at the profusion of "Martinis," or the numerous "French" terms that chefs throw about quite wrecklessly.  Personally, I love both Chicago deep dish and NY style with a nice chewy crust, or a nice wood oven baked pizza with a semi thin crust that is crisp on the outside and chewy on the inside.  What I dislike is the crack thin crust that you find all over WI and MN.  I don't really care for it, and hate it being cut into those little squares.  And I have to disagree that Deep dish is like throwing toppings on top of a loaf of bread.  I don't find deep dish overly bread like.  Sure the crust is thicker but no where near bread like, not nearly as bread like as some of the major chain pizza places, one beginning with the letter D and the other beginning with the letters PJ.
     
  19. schmoozer

    schmoozer

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    Last edited: Mar 20, 2010
  20. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Thin crust + wood fired oven at 700 degrees = Heaven