Thin blade Cleaver......

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by jonnyboy369, Oct 17, 2014.

  1. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    Hello all, I am wondering can anyone recommend a Chinese Cleaver for me. I have several already, but I want a specific thing. I want a short, very high carbon cleaver with a very thin blade and a well curved belly. I have a Winco stainless one that I love the big curve of the blade, but it is too thick for vegetables it breaks them. I have another that is very thin high carbon, and I love how the thin blade performs. It is however too long, and the blade has no curvature. My perfect cleaver will combine that thin high carbon blade with the short and curved blade of the Winco. Im not too worried about price, a cheap or expensive one is fine as long as it meets those criteria. I look around Chinatown all the time, but the only curved blade ones I find are very thick. I want this item because at my current job I can do most of the work with just this if I find it and leave most of my kit at home. Thanks
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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  3. ordo

    ordo

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    jonny: May i ask why do you like curved cleavers?
     
  4. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    I like the curved cleaver because you can mince things with it very easily. I like the cleavers overall because when its busy I can use the blade to move things quickly after cutting. Ive used one side by side with a chef knife alot, for me its a more versatile knife.
     
  5. denverveggienut

    denverveggienut

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  6. ordo

    ordo

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    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    You can maybe save some money by sending your thick one out for thinning.  Someone correct me if needed here, but I believe that can be done for about $35 with the shipping.

    Then again you could always change your mincing technique to the "guillotine and glide," that term made infamous by BDL.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  8. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    Wow I would love to have the Winco thinned actually I didn't know that was possible... Here I went and said price was no object, it wasnt at the time of posting but now ive moved and have way more rent to pay. Lol. That Suien Cleaver looks like what I ideally would like if I had the $. Can you tell me Rick where to send my Winco to have it thinned?
     
  9. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    I can still afford $35-50 but not $175 at this time.
     
  10. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    What does that term refer to.
     
  11. benuser

    benuser

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  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Jonny I did a quick goggle and was surprised at how little shows up, cause I know there are hundreds of competent guys out there doing this.  I suggest doing a specific post here, and perhaps better still on CKTG's forum and perhaps even better still on kitchenknivesforum.

    Rick
     
  13. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    um chopping lmao? honestly that seems to be a term that was invented here. I searched google extensively and alot of the posts are in some way related to this website. A rose by any other name I guess.
     
  14. benuser

    benuser

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    BDL wrote about calling the classic French action by the term Guillotine and glide -- fourth line in the linked article:
    But as far as I know (a) no
    one else does; and (b) there is no
    real name for it.
    No sir, it's no chopping.
     
  15. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Whoops I misspoke. It's simply called slicing. Most people who don't work in a professional kitchen of course wouldn't know these things and so invent silly names. "guillotine and glide" :lol: cute.
     
  16. benuser

    benuser

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    BDL who is absent here for the moment happened to work in professional kitchens. Careful reading of the linked article may convince you that it's not just slicing he described.
     
  17. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Yep. the sliding forward is part of slicing. It's slicing. The fact that everyone calls it slicing and BDL (while I do respect the knowledge he displays re knives) found it necessary to invent a new term is strange.
     
  18. benuser

    benuser

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    As I understand it, the forward movement, the slicing, is the second part. The landing or diving is how it starts -- "guillotine".
     
  19. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Yep. Exactly what happens in the video. Nobody would slide the knfe without bringing the blade into contact with the board first.... ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
  20. benuser

    benuser

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    Anyway, it's BDL's merit to have made rock-choppers aware of the distal taper which is so pronounced with the traditional Sabs.
     
    spoiledbroth likes this.