Thin blade Cleaver......

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by jonnyboy369, Oct 17, 2014.

  1. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    Hello all, I am wondering can anyone recommend a Chinese Cleaver for me. I have several already, but I want a specific thing. I want a short, very high carbon cleaver with a very thin blade and a well curved belly. I have a Winco stainless one that I love the big curve of the blade, but it is too thick for vegetables it breaks them. I have another that is very thin high carbon, and I love how the thin blade performs. It is however too long, and the blade has no curvature. My perfect cleaver will combine that thin high carbon blade with the short and curved blade of the Winco. Im not too worried about price, a cheap or expensive one is fine as long as it meets those criteria. I look around Chinatown all the time, but the only curved blade ones I find are very thick. I want this item because at my current job I can do most of the work with just this if I find it and leave most of my kit at home. Thanks
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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  3. ordo

    ordo

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    jonny: May i ask why do you like curved cleavers?
     
  4. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    I like the curved cleaver because you can mince things with it very easily. I like the cleavers overall because when its busy I can use the blade to move things quickly after cutting. Ive used one side by side with a chef knife alot, for me its a more versatile knife.
     
  5. denverveggienut

    denverveggienut

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  6. ordo

    ordo

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    Last edited: Oct 19, 2014
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    You can maybe save some money by sending your thick one out for thinning.  Someone correct me if needed here, but I believe that can be done for about $35 with the shipping.

    Then again you could always change your mincing technique to the "guillotine and glide," that term made infamous by BDL.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2014
  8. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    Wow I would love to have the Winco thinned actually I didn't know that was possible... Here I went and said price was no object, it wasnt at the time of posting but now ive moved and have way more rent to pay. Lol. That Suien Cleaver looks like what I ideally would like if I had the $. Can you tell me Rick where to send my Winco to have it thinned?
     
  9. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    I can still afford $35-50 but not $175 at this time.
     
  10. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    What does that term refer to.
     
  11. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Jonny I did a quick goggle and was surprised at how little shows up, cause I know there are hundreds of competent guys out there doing this.  I suggest doing a specific post here, and perhaps better still on CKTG's forum and perhaps even better still on kitchenknivesforum.

    Rick
     
  12. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    um chopping lmao? honestly that seems to be a term that was invented here. I searched google extensively and alot of the posts are in some way related to this website. A rose by any other name I guess.
     
  13. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Whoops I misspoke. It's simply called slicing. Most people who don't work in a professional kitchen of course wouldn't know these things and so invent silly names. "guillotine and glide" :lol: cute.
     
  14. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Yep. the sliding forward is part of slicing. It's slicing. The fact that everyone calls it slicing and BDL (while I do respect the knowledge he displays re knives) found it necessary to invent a new term is strange.
     
  15. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Yep. Exactly what happens in the video. Nobody would slide the knfe without bringing the blade into contact with the board first.... ;)
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    SB, first thing to understand is that I mentioned the G+L in relation to the OP's preference for mincing with a curved blade.  The G+L is, amongst other things, a technique used for mincing with a flat-edged blade, and I believe is thought by many to be superior for that task, and many others.

    That aside, there is an art of the knife you don't find all too much of outside of Japan, where the cut itself makes the meal, and it takes a very sharp knife and fine control to produce.  As example, try taking your prep knife, and just as it comes from the $5 sharpener guy, and attempt to cut <1mm slices of onion and celery, and also have those high-moisture slices perfectly smooth of surface and actually even dry looking, due to the fact that you actually sliced thru individual cells, rather crushing numerous layers of cells into a mush as you blasted thru with your $5 edge.  And it becomes a whole n'other order of magnitude when considering raw fish.  This also adds a whole new dimension to what is a typical julienne or chiffonade, a simple diced beet or onion even, your cole slaw, etc.  The texture, freshness, tatste and ultimate sensory experience of the product are significantly affected.

    Maybe most folks wouldn't notice the difference/care for the most part, but you have to consider there are those who do.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
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  17. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    :rolleyes: If you genuinely believe that your knives cut cells on a microscopic level, I cannot help you. Without the obvious example of eggs your knives are not "slicing cells". Even a 5nm blade (not what you can achieve with your knives unless they're obisidian boxcutters) coming into contact with a cell is roughly equivalent to an 18 wheeler colliding with a person... the truck does not slice cleanly through the person, for the sake of our argument. It happens rarely, sure. Same with the old wives tale about cutting onions with a sharp knife doesn't make you cry because the gas doesn't get released blah blah blah nonsense.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
  18. cm-chef

    cm-chef

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    R.L. Is not completely wrong and you are a little mistaken. Almost all knives are much thinner then 5mm at the edge, 5mm is almost as thick as a pencil. What your thinking of (I think) is the knifes bevel and not its edge? A knife "bevilles" down to under a micron in thickness (thinner then a cell). Knives do in fact cut threw cells, (hence you bleed when you cut yourself, you are cuting threw red blood cells), sharp ones just do it better, or "cleaner". Job at it. Knives cut cells in very much the same way a laser does, with heat. At the edge of a knife there is A tremendous amount of pressure and friction generated, a very sharp knife creates enough friction to cauterise the cell membrane's as the knife slices threw it. This can be noticed in a chiffonade of basil that stays green all day when cut with a sharp knife.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
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  19. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    Actually nm is a measurement of nanometers... 1 billionth of a metre... thanks! Your understanding of physics is way way way off too. ;) And chiffonade of basil is no more resiliant to oxidation than uncut basil, less so actually.
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
  20. jonnyboy369

    jonnyboy369

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    Oh and Rick, I'm pretty familiar with the technique for using the flat blade. I couldn't get it to mince Rosemary or Thyme that way though. I really would probably use my big old "Ho Ching Kee Lee" carbon cleaver for everything in the kitchen if it would just mince those herbs, or if I knew how to. That Cleaver is the sharpest thing in our kitchen, it is like obsidian almost its crazy. Its too long also though.