The way you eat is truly inspiring

Discussion in 'Q&A With Mario Batali' started by gonefishin, May 9, 2010.

  1. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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    At home cook
        I believe we are what we eat.  But there is also a large part of us that is what our mothers gave us while we were infants, children and adults.  

       Mario, thanks for taking this time to share with us, here at ChefTalk...and Happy Mothers Day to all of the mothers in all of our lives.

      I don't receive cable programming so I haven't had an opportunity to see any of your recent programs in the past few years.  But what I find most inspiring about the television personality is the way you eat!  You simply eat with such passion...but isn't food really that good?  YES!  

       I used to think that my love of cooking is driven solely by the wonderful flavors in the world.  Thinking that if I were to lose my ability to taste I would have no reason to cook.  While this may be nice to chuckle at...I do get a lot of joy out of watching people eat as well.  But it's always about the flavors.  Heirloom vegetables, homegrown vegetables, cured meats (Pio Tosini, Iberico, Iberico Bellota, La Quercia, Iberico de Bellota, Petit Jesu, etc.), beef, pork, CHEESE...my word...the list goes on and on.  There's just too many variations in the flavors of the world to stop eating!

       If ever you find yourself south of Chicago and have a taste for some cured meat, cheeses, grilled calamari, fresh harvested olive oils (in season), gumbo, smoked goods...stop on in and enjoy some of the flavors that my family and I have come to enjoy.  Even if my oldest daughter said Iberico de Bellota tastes like candy corn./img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif

         My question... (sorry for being long winded)

         I 'm satisfied with the bowl of red pasta fagioli that I currently make.  But I recently went to LaScarola (in Chicago) and was blown away by the flavors in their white pasta fagioli.  Do you have any suggestions on making a white pasta fagioli that slaps you on the face with it's complex (yet not overpowering) flavor?  Is there a history or region that the white bean soup is linked to?

         enjoy the food!

        dan