The very best Omelette recipes?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by le francais, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. le francais

    le francais

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    Omelette's are pretty straightforward, I think everyone knows how to make one. But what is the key to making a great Omelette? Never did my Omelettes manage to be as good as the ones my mother used to cook for my when I was a child. How about we all share our favourite omelette recipes here?

    Here's my "Country Omelette" Recipe:

    - Four Eggs

    - 200ml Milk

    - Two peeled potatoes cut into fine square pieces

    - Small pieces of chicken breast

    - 1 Teaspoon Salt

    - 1/2 Teaspoon Pepper
     
  2. benway

    benway

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    Everyone knows how to make an omelette, but I can count on two hands the number of people I know who routinely do it perfectly.
     
  3. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    As far as "flavors", I like toasted walnuts and Gorgonzola.
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Oh boy.  I can safely say that I do not know a single person who can successfully make a good omelet except for myself.  I do know lots of people who think they make good omelets but sadly they're wrong. 

    It's often the simplest things in the world that are the hardest to master.
     
  5. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I never add milk to an omelette.
     
    mrmexico25 likes this.
  6. colin

    colin

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    http://www.randomhouse.com/knopf/authors/child/recipe.html

    My technique is a little different, but I think Julia Child has the essence of the thing: a couple of fresh eggs with just a little seasoning, a hot pan, and very quick cooking so you get the thing cooked while keeping it tender and light.  She has some ideas for fillings.  I find it difficult to get fillings right under the time pressure.

    I agree with Koukouvagia that good omelettes are rare.  Most of what goes under the name, especially in U.S. restaurants, are horrible tough baked-egg concoctions.  My Dad, who taught me, kept a seasoned omelette pan that he used for nothing else.
     
  7. jimcuda

    jimcuda

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    I'm an amateur that has been lurking for a few days after I stumbled on the site while doing some research on a Chef's Knife.  

    As a coincidence, I've been haunted by the classic french omelette after watching Jacques Pepin's Omelette Video after Thanksgiving: 



    He makes it look easy, but I've made omelettes multiple times a week for a 4-5 weeks, been through much frustration & disappointment, over a hundred eggs, and only today do I feel pretty good about making them. As far as ingredients; the flavor of a good mushroom goes really well with the eggs. I sauteed some shiitakes and chopped them up to go in the mix today, but tomorrow, I'll just top the omelette with sauteed sliced shiitakes.

    This video has also got me on the search for a proper omelette pan. From what I've read on this site, I'm leaning towards a plain steel pan that I'll have to season like a Matfer or Vollrath.
     
  8. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I'm fairly set in my ways when it comes to cooking an omelet.  Or an omelette if you prefer that spelling.  My wife likes hers with a bit of brown crust, drier than I do.  She likes her eggs way overdone compared to my taste.  She'll put some scrambled eggs in a pan over the heat, then go and brush the cats, put a load of laundry in the washer, stir her eggs, vacuum the living room then plate her scramble.  Okay, maybe I embellished it a bit.

    I use a small 8" non stick pan, usually only 2, sometimes 3 eggs.  No extra milk, water or anything unless I have an open container of heavy cream in the fridge.  Than maybe a teaspoon or two of that.  A good knob of butter into the pan over medium heat, when hot pour in the well beaten eggs.  I don't stir, I let it start to set up then lift the cooked parts to let the raw parts flow under for a while.  Shake the pan to keep it loose.  When about 2/3 of it has set I flip it over.   I've mentioned this in the past, but this step has to be done correctly.  If I think about it, worry about it or just pay attention to it in any way the flip goes poorly, splashing raw egg over the stove, messing up the pan or whatever.  When I do it with a zen like mindset, trusting my muscle memory to articulate the pan just so, it works.  Or you can just use a silicone spatula.

    As soon as I flip it I put the fillings on one half, then fold the other half over the fillings.  Then I wait until the skin starts to crust and brown, and slide it out of the pan about 30 seconds before that happens ;-)

    It turns out an American style bi-fold omelet, not a French style tri-fold.  My fillings usually involve sauteed mushrooms. various types of cheeses, ham, bacon, sausage, maybe onions.  A recent favorite was some crab meat in cream cheese with a healthy splash of cayenne pepper sauce - Yum.

    mjb.
     
  9. chefedb

    chefedb

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    There are three types , French, American and Italian.Frnch requires the most dexterity. and soft on inside no color on outside.  I am certain that most people do not need a RECIPE for the dish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  10. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    From Margcata:

    The Spanish love their omelettes literally daily ( I cannot imagine their cholesterol levels ), and each region has their own style ... However, a couple of the most popular here are:

    1) The Spanish Omelette ( tortilla española ) which in fact is a potato and onion omelette and served as pinchos ( tapas ) in numerous bars and restaurants

    2) The French Style Omelette ( un-filled ) and very common for a lunch with salad or a soup

    3) The Country Style Omelette ( filled with ham or bacon, potatoes, vegetables of season and onion ( more common in towns and villages outside of the Capital ) Each region has their take on this one

    Then, Italians have a Fritatta as do the Mexicans and these are also filled with Red and Green Bell Pepper, Onion and other vegetables of choice and in Mexico with chili peppers and cheese. 

    If anybody wishes to have a recipe for Spanish Omelette, please drop me a note and I shall post it. Since, personally I am not a big egg eater ( like my Hard Boiled stuffed with tuna salad or egg salad sandwiches on occasion or Eggs Benedict with Canadian Bacon and Hollandaise ) I have not yet posted it.  
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  11. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    When asking for the very best omelette recipes, you cannot forget an omelette with fresh truffle shavings on top. It's one of the best foodpairings but also the most decadent thing to eat imo as you cannot go cheap serving only a few pellets of truffle on the omelette, it has to be plenty and the omelette stays open showing how much truffle is on it!

    Many times fresh (unbroken) eggs are stored in a closed container, together with a truffle. The eggs will absorb the truffle aromas!

    As far as I know, french types of omelettes are many times not rolled nor folded for presentation except for posh cheffy presentations, they come as they lay in the pan, always still wet (baveux), so they are never turned to cook both sides. Milk is not added and the eggs are never whisked but gently loosened using 2 forks next to each other in one hand. Making a good omelette is a real skill. It is known that (french) chefs test potential new cooks by having them make a simple omelette.
     
  12. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Jacque Pepin is the man!  I come from a long line of family that desire their eggs to be browned on all sides and from every angle.  Having a nice custardy french omelet like Pepin made is a treat only for myself.
     
  13. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    @ JimC , your video was nice to watch, thank you for sharing that.

    @ Chris, your right, it is all about technique. Not everyone has a truffle stored in their kitchen but when the occasion arrives it can turn it into a wonderful experience.

    @ KK. I agree with you , he is known for great food and spot on technique. Many people look at him and maybe think he was not an "in" chef, but look at his humble beginnings....a child growing up and learning in his parents kitchen to being a chef for president Charles de Gaulle and everything else he has done in his life, how can we not respect a man like that ?

    A thought....

    Petals.
     
  14. ishbel

    ishbel

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    KK - I didn't watch the video, but I adore a custardy-type French omelette, with a little chopped herbs as the only filling.

    Spanish style omelettes were always a favourite of my children's friends - funny, because most of them professed to like neither eggs nor vegetables!
     
     
  15. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Carbon steel pans are old school compared to non-stick.  Both work well.  It takes a little extra care -- or maybe it's self discipline -- to maintain carbon as compared to almost anything else except cast iron; but cast iron is impractical for large omelets, at least the way I make them, because the pan needs so much manipulation.  I much prefer carbon to anything else for omelets.  Matfer, de Buyer and Vollrath are certainly very good, and Amazon sells a brand as World Cuisine (I forget the real French or Belgian maker) which is also good -- if a little light for omelets.  My new favorite is "Mineral" by de Buyer.  A little pricey for a carbon steel pan, but solid.

    It's easier to make a small 2 egg omelet in a small 8" pan, than a larger omelet in a larger pan.  Otherwise, it's the same process.  You choose pan size by the number of eggs you use, so as not to make the omelet to thick.   Some omelets, like Margcata's tortilla Espanola are very thick -- but by and large they should be fairly thin so as not to overwhelm their fillings.  

    There are other types of omelets besides French rolled (Parisienne), French folded (country style), tortilla, fritata and strata (can the last two properly be termed omelets?). 

    There's "pancake style" (aka "deli style") for one.  The eggs in a pancake style omelet are cooked on one side, than flipped like a pancake to cook the other side while maintaining the round shape of the pan and keeping the "filling" on top instead of stuffing it into the (non-existent) inside.  

    We most often make two or three egg, country style omelets in a 10" pan.  When I make omelets, I agitate then fold (with a half flip) without using utensils then flip the finished omelet and slide it onto the plate rather than inverting. I learned to do the no utensil stuff because it's showy and I did a little time (for my sins) at the omelet station of a few breakfast buffet lines.  It doesn't work any better.  

    Linda likes her eggs cooked through but not very brown on the outside.  My idea of a perfect omelet includes browning and a center which is neither liquid or solid, but a perfect custard.  My new favorite filling is huitlacoche. 

    BDL   
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  16. chefbuba

    chefbuba

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    This thread just inspired me to go make an omlette for breakfast.....It was good. Just set eggs, no color and a bit of extra sharp white cheddar.
     
  17. margcata

    margcata Banned

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    @ Chef Buba,

    Yes, one can find themselves getting hungry and stimulating appetite just reading www.cheftalk.com !
     
  18. colin

    colin

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    Oof!  Where are you getting the huitlacoche, BDL?
     
  19. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Big Mexican markets like Gonzalez Bros, Vallarta, El Mercado, Gigante...  You can usually -- but not always -- find it canned.

    Los Agaves, a small restaurant on Mountain in Ontario, has huitlacoche in omelets and quesadillas.  Terrific little family place with its own, Jalisco regional spin.  We get off the freeway in Diamond Bar on Central and drive into Ontario.  From early Spring through Summer, there are fruit stands set in front of productive strawberry fields along the way. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2012
  20. chefedb

    chefedb

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    How would you like to make egg salad without having to peel the eggs?