The steak of the crocodile and the leg of the kangaroo...

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During Christmas I had the opportunity to spend more time in the supermarket. I observed a new trend on the shelves. Tiny cans of delicatessen that was coming from parts of wild animals thatdon't exist in Greece...
Meat of crocodile or kangaroo for example and I felt tad disturbed.Why have we turned into omnivorous creatures that want to taste everything that exists in Nature? Do you find this normal? Is that mere curiosity or just a signal of our urge to dominate the Nature?

Do you find this thread disturbing too and what about the industry? Don't you find that this is a signal of decline?
 
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Disturbing? Not at all. Humans have always been curious about foodstuff. Now we have the modern means to satisfy our curiosity. Kangaroo and crocodiles are not "new" products. They have been consumed for a long time in various parts of the world. I guess that's why it doesn't disturb me as would, say, escargot caviar (remember that one?) did.

This wonderful gastronomic diversity is what we celebrate as food lovers. As long as it's safe and it doesn't endanger any species, I think it's a valid way to experience other cultures.

I've had crocodile, cajun style. Not bad, but there's no risk of extinction from my consumption! :)
 
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I personally have to agree with Anneke on this one. It's not really as if we discovered a new species and some "chef" decided it was worth tasting and selling to a gullible public like the aforementioned Snail Caviar. OMG:eek: :eek: I do remember that fiasco! How seriously nasty!
 
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I guess that people of Australia eat kngaroos and crocodiles for centuries now since those species are part of their natural environment but in Greece we have been living for ages, creating superb dishes without having to resort to species out of our fauna.

One the one hand gastronomic diversity is a need, curiosity is a fact but I don't like it when we forget which basic needs makes us cook and how cooking reflects our real needs and cultural background. Hence, my reservations.
 
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you haven't lived till you have had aligator prepared properly. sauce piquant,,,, or just fried with a little japalano ranch dip, mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm. i have to agree with the others that as long as their are new things to try the general populus will do it,, that is human nature.
 
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Kangeroos have to be culled.
Very tasty and low in fat, all that hopping around. We feature it on the menu in the colder months occasionally. Slow braised with stacks of crispy bread, beautiful.
Crocodile I could give a miss except there is one next door on the wild park reserve and if we have a flood this year and it gets out I will be tempted:)
 
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These animals are usually farmed. Otherwise they wouldn't be allowed to sell to the public.

Allthough from a moral - not practical - standpoint, is it better to eat an animal that has never been out of it's barn, or an animal that has lead a full and natural life in the wild? My guess is the latter tastes better too.
 
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Has taste any morality? :D I guess that with this rhetorical question I gave an answer to my original dilemma myself.

Yes of course, every animal that hasn't been barned tastes better, we that we have lived in our Mediterranean villages can assure you about that.

Maybe my problem is with "out of context" tastes. I guess it's normal for an Australian to eat kangaroo but something goes wrong when a Greek can't live without it.

BTW Soussweets.

A couple of weeks ago "The Preservation Hall Band visited Athens and it was one my strongest experiences ever. I have promised myself to visit New Orleans only to see the Band there, in The Preservation Hall...

Da ya think that I must eat crocodile afterwards? How does it go with whiskey? :D
 

pete

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Then to take that to it's conclusion, you will have to give up eating most fish, since they are not a domesticated animal.

Secondly how is this any different then the introduction of forgien vegetables into a cuisine? Where would Greek cuisine be (or any cuisine be) without products from forgein lands. Products also once thought to be superfulous, or unneccessary?
 
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I am interested in the moral standpoint.

I take it this is in relation to the killing of animals. What is the difference between killing a 'barned' animal and one in the wild.I do mean shot by professional shooters for reasons of culling and not red neck yahoos out for sport?


From the cooking end to it you have great built in flavours.
 
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Wild animals pontificate, barned animals do not.


Pete, fish are not warm blooded animals, but, alas, many are farmed.

Athenaues, Croc goes really well with Whiskey, especially after your 4th glass:D
 
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I don't think anyone has said this yet, so: I'm not sure why you view this as a new phenomenon, Athenaeus... Humans have always tested anything they could catch/pluck/harvest to see if it was worth eating. The things we don't eat either taste awful, are poisonous, or yield too little edible material for the effort of catching/cultivating them. The only change is that the foods that are geographically limited in origin can now be transported to new environments. Again, the same thing humans have always done.
 
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Wild animals pontificate, barned animals do not.


Sorry Pete, I have absolutely no idea what you mean by this statement. would you elaborate on this a little :)
 
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True but this always was vital when they were in a primordial stage. Now that we have everything here is Athens can't we live without crocodile?


The consumption of food is restricted by religious codes and social taboos as well.
 
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