The (sometimes fruitless) search for ingredients

332
10
Joined Jan 26, 2001
I would love the recipe, thanks.

I wonder if the problems have to do with chickpeas being a protein rather than a grain?

~~Shimmer~~
 

isa

3,236
11
Joined Apr 4, 2000
Chickpea Flour Pizza

2/3 cup chcikpea flour
1/3 teaspoon salt
3 tablespoons olive oil
Freshly ground black pepper


Sift the chickpea flour and salt into a bowl. Very slowly stir in 1 cup of water with a wooden spoon, stopping while the batter is still paste like to beat out all the lumps, then slowly adding the rest of the water. Set the batter aside for 30 minutes. Strain it through a sieve if it is still lumpy.

Preheat the broiler.


Put one tablespoon of oil in a 12 inch non stick frying pan and set it over medium high heat. When hot, stir the batter from the bottom and pour it into the frying pan. Pour 2 tablespoons of oil over the top of the pizza, sprinkle lightly with black pepper, and cook on top of the stove for 4 minutes. During that time, big bubbles will rise from the bottom; you may burst them with the tip of a knife. When the pizza batter looks as if it is set, put the frying pan under the broiler about 5 inches from the source of the heat for 4 to 5 minutes, or until it is golden all over and has some nice brown patches. You m ay need to turn the pan around to achieve evenness. Serves hot.

Makes 1 pizza to serve 2 to 4.
 
205
11
Joined Jun 1, 2001
Shimmer, I don't know why you'd have that problem. I make the chickpea flour crepes out of the Millennium Cookbook all the time, using no oil at all except a drop of cooking spray, and they don't do that. (I also love chickpea flour "pooras", which are a sort of East Indian eggless omelette, and I make oven-baked pakoras... mmm, chickpea flour!) Anyway, one thing I've found with the Millennium crepes is that, even more than other kinds, the first one is ALWAYS a write-off -- and I have to wait until the thing is solidly set before attempting to turn it. But all that oil should not be necessary.

I love ingredient quests, myself, but maybe that's because my town, though small and mostly very very white, does have surprise pockets of otherness. Very exciting! I have all these little lists in my head: the discount supermarket that also caters to lots of West Indians and so has all sorts of unusual veggies; the East Indian store tucked in the back of a faceless mall in the north end of town... It's like a treasure hunt. :smiles:
 
1
10
Joined Jul 17, 2002
City Market or King Soopers or health food stores usually carry Chic Pea Flour or Garbanzo Bean Flour. It is just dried chick peas milled fine, like a powder. It is very high in protein. Go to health food section of your local super market. :chef:
 
332
10
Joined Jan 26, 2001
Trust me, local supermarkets and health food stores did not have it. I thought the bigger ones, at least, would. I checked the baking aisle, nutrition aisle, and international food section as well as asking department managers.

I tried:

Meijer
Super Target
Super Wal-Mart
Marsh
Kroger
import stores (Cost Plus Food Market)
health food stores (7)
natural food stores (3)

Only one place even knew what it was, and they are who ordered it for me!

Now, in other states, chickpea/garbanzo bean flour might be more readily available. I suppose I am just unlucky.

=) ~~Shimmer~~
 
9,209
68
Joined Aug 29, 2000
Shimmer, I thought of you yesterday when I visited Glorioso's market on Brady St. in Milwaukee. They had bags of chickpea flour right next to the bags of chestnut flour. They also had a large selection of middle eastern foods, and I found both rosewater and orange blossom water.
 
467
10
Joined Jan 11, 2002
I had missed this thread, so haven't posted this recipe yet...
Farinata is a typical, ancient Genovese food made with chickpea flour, so popular here that there are in town many specific shops, called "Farinatai", which sell it. They are a sort of takeaway, also making focaccia, pizza and vegetable pies...but the Farinata is their specialty. Being so diffused (also many housewives make it at home) you can find chickpea flour everywhere here! Of course I can't suggest you to take the first flight to Genoa, but it's likely that a food shop specialized in Ligurian (or, perhaps, generally Italian) food items can have it.
On the other hand, I can't give you any recipe to make chickpea flour by scratch, just because it's so cheap and easily available here that nobody would be so crazy to make it by himself...
As for the recipe, it looks a bit like the "Chickpea flour Pizza" posted by Isa, that seems to be largely based on our Farinata.

FARINATA GENOVESE

Ingredients (for a 15 inch round Pizza baking tin, which serves 3-4...consider that the "Farinatai" use 40 inch copper tins and baker ovens):

9 oz chickpea flour
1 liter warm water
1 glass olive oil
1 pinch salt
freshly grated black pepper

optionals:
Fresh rosemary
or
Finely sliced young onions
or
finely sliced fresh artichokes
or
"Bianchetti" (baby anchovies, about 1 inch long) but probably you can't find them in US...

1)Gradually add the warm water to the chickpea flour and mix well to make a batter. Add the olive oil and salt. Keep aside for 2-3 hours, then skim the batter.

2)Pour the batter in the baking tin (you don't need to grease it). It must be at the most 1/2 inch thick. Bake it at 400° F until the edge is browned and the top is golden. Serve hot, sprinkled with pepper.

3)This is the plain recipe. To make a tastier Farinata, you can scatter on the surface one of the "optional" ingredients, just before putting it into the oven.

Although the homemade Farinata never ends up as good as the "professional" one, you can get the same a good result, mainly if you don't make it too thick (it's the mistake most people do) and if you have a good oven and a very large Pizza tin.

Pongi
 
1,046
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Joined Apr 19, 2001
HI, Pongi,

We have a great Italian deli here, owned by a Sicilian family; they make a bread/cake/? out of chickpea flour, that they call
'Panella'. Are you familiar with that?
 
467
10
Joined Jan 11, 2002
Marmalady,
Panelle are another Italian specialty made out of chickpea flour, but they are fritters and not a baked food. As you already know, they come from Sicily, and are usually served together with potato fritters (PANELLE E CROCCHE'). The recipes are very easy and you can surely make them also at home:)

PANELLE

Ingredients (serve 4-5)
-1 lb chickpea flour
-1 liter water
-1 handful minced parsley
-salt and pepper to taste
-frying oil

Gradually add the chickpea flour to the water and stir well to get a smooth batter. Season with salt, pepper and parsley. Bring to the boil on a low heat and cook, stirring continuously, until you get a solid paste (it will take about 40 mins).
Pour it on a plate (if you don't have, as I suppose, the apposite round molds) and spread it to get a 1/4 inch thick, homogeneous layer. Cool it down and cut in squares or lozenges with a knife.
Fry the Panelle in oil.


CROCCHE'

Ingredients:
-2 lb potatoes
-1 handful minced parsley
-1/2 cup grated parmesan
-salt and pepper to taste
-1 minced garlic clove (optional)
-breadcrumbs (optional)
-frying oil

Boil the potatoes until tender and mash them (or push them through a sieve). Season with salt, pepper, parsley and garlic if you like it. Make with this dough many small croquettes (about 3 inches long) giving them a cylindric shape (they're also called "cazzilli"...please don't ask me to translate:blush: ). You can fry them plain, or coated with breadcrumbs.
Arrange them on a tray with the Panelle and serve.

Buon Appetito!

Pongi
 
97
10
Joined Jan 31, 2002
Isa,

What amazingly obscure things are you cooking that you can't find the ingredients in Montreal? You are in Montreal, right? Boy do I miss all those ethnic markets.

regards,
P
 
2,550
13
Joined Mar 13, 2001
Even though we have a huge Indian community here, it's still hard to find fresh curry leaves without going for a long drive.

Buttermilk powder! Now that's a tough one to find around here along with double acting baking powder.

And forget about King Arthur Flour...which is available only by mail order! :(
 
2,550
13
Joined Mar 13, 2001
I tell ya, sometimes, it feels just like that, the stix...gotta schmooze with the bagel shop guy to get my hands on high protein flour...he's quite nice but I'm already spoken for...:rolleyes:
 

isa

3,236
11
Joined Apr 4, 2000
Moxie,

Sure Montreal is a big city yet it seems I’m always looking for something and can’t find it. I am still looking for cocoa butter, inverted sugar, cassia leaves, whole turmeric and galangal. I know where to get about 100 pounds of inverted sugar and cocoa butter though.


Of the more common ingredients, double acting baking powder is harder to find than a needle in a hay stack.


And this is just a few items, there are a lot more ingredients that are impossible to find. I know of Us suppliers but I'd rather find a local or Canadian source.
 
97
10
Joined Jan 31, 2002
O.k. you got me. I'm stumped. I have no idea where those things are likely to be found.

But, as far as flour goes, what's wrong with five roses? That's a nice hard flour, isn't it? Canadian and therefore on par with King Aurthur (milled from "hard" wheat).

Regards,
P
 
2,550
13
Joined Mar 13, 2001
Hi Moxie,

I agree about Five Roses Flour; it is better than Robin Hood's. But would you believe it if I told you that the bread white flour is difficult to find?

I also went on their website www.fiveroses.com so that I could compare the specs vs. King Arthur; their site is very slow and doesn't work half the time. :mad:

Besides, I'm not sure that they can claim that their flour is "never bromated", like the King Arthur's.

Edited to add:

Well I finally got onto their website. In their descriptions of various flours, they don't even give you any percentages. Here are two examples:

1) Unbleached Bread Flour

Five Roses Unbleached Bread Flour is a stronger flour with higher gluten level to provide you with better volume breads. The texture of the crumb is light and delicious bread after bread. Breads made from Five Roses Unbleached Bread Flour rise more rapidly and require less kneading time.

2) Five Roses Canada's Best Stone Ground Organic Whole Wheat Flour

A coarser textured flour ground from the entire wheat kernal - bran and endosperm. It gives a delicious nutty flavour and a denser texture that when all purpose flour is used, due to a higher percentage of gluten (protein) and bran. In most recipes, whole wheat flour can be mixed half and half with all purpose white or never bleached flour with most satisfactory results.

Made from 100% organically grown wheat, and stone milled. Canada's Best is a high source of dietery fibre.

And if you dare calling them, they make you feel like you're from Mars... :confused: :eek:
 
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