The sharpest knife?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by chefboy2160, Mar 27, 2014.

  1. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    So do you knife geeks and gurus know what knife is the sharpest that you can use to cut with that requires no sharpening?
     
  2. benuser

    benuser

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    A thin, carbon peeler -- e.g. by Robert Herder -- will hardly require any sharpening, stropping from time to time will do. If not used for other tasks than peeling, of course, and hand cutting of peeled potatoes. No board contact.
     
  3. knifesavers

    knifesavers

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    Obsidian. It isn't practical but experimental scalpels have been made of it.

    I've seen some "caveman" knives made of it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
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  4. mike9

    mike9

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    I'd love a 240mm Obsidian Gyuto, but I'm not holding my breath.  All edges need sharpening at some point.  If you are lazy about sharpening then Aogami Super, or Devin Thomas's AEB-L is for you.  BUT - at some point you will need to take them to the stones.

    Hmmm . . . a professional chef asking this question . . . someone might be Trolling.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  5. galley swiller

    galley swiller

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    I'm half tempted to say "Kiwi Knives". just to provoke a reaction. See:   http://www.cheftalk.com/t/64354/kiwi-brand-knives   Begin at Post #26.

    Seriously,

    The only way you can have a knife that requires no sharpening is to have a knife that is never used to cut anything. Then you can be guaranteed that it will never dull.

    In the real world, the use of any knife results in the eventual dulling of the edge and the subsequent need to sharpen.  That's just part of reality

    GS
     
  6. nyikeen

    nyikeen

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    I think the Goko Damascus 240mm Gyuto is the sharpest one period.
     
  7. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    Obsidian is the correct answer. Eye surgeons use these scalpels as they do not tear and leave the scar tissue that surgical stainless ones do. The Spaniards reported that the Aztecs war Swords could cut of a Horses head. And that knife which cut out the hearts of uncounted numbers of sacrificial victims was made out of good old Obsidian. Historians are now speculating that the reason the very advanced Indian cultures of this area did not develop metallurgy to the extant other parts of the world did was that they had no need to due to there wealth of Obsidian and its ability to do the cutting tasks needed by there cultures. Here is a good read on the subject http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi1086.htm. Enjoy! Oh and now you know what the sharpest knife really is.
     
  8. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Sharpness is only one aspect of a knife, and arguably not one of the most important.  An obsidian indeed can be made "sharper" than a steel one but is otherwise inferior in almost every other way.  Knapped tools are not nearly as durable as good steel.  Glass, like obsidian, can be staggeringly sharp; the edge can be about as thin as a single molecule.  But you don't see glass knives used for much outside of the laboratory because they're not all all durable.  Chirt, obsidian, glass etc also can't be reliably resharpened to the degree that steel can.

    I'm not knocking obsidian but I doubt we'll see it making inroads into the culinary knife market.