The roast is too big!

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Oct 14, 2010.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    It is one of those times where we decide to spend a whole week clearing out the freezer rather than going shopping.  I found a 6lb eye round roast in my ice box.  I have defrosted it and rubbed it with lots of salt and have let it sit in the fridge like that over night.  Tonight I will be roasting it.

    Problem, it's just for the two of us.  Ordinarily I would call a couple of friends over who would help us out with it but we are not up for guests tonight and I'm going out of town for the weekend for work tomorrow.  I will instruct hubby to use what's left over for sandwiches etc, but if I cook this roast tonight will it still be good by sunday?  How long can we spread out the use of this meat?  Can I freeze it after it's cooked?  How long is roast beef good without spoiling?
     
  2. maryb

    maryb

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    Thin slice and freeze in meal size packages for french dips, or portion and freeze for hash, soups, chili...
     
  3. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Yes, it will still be good on Sunday.  Monday, even Tuesday.  So, eat it on Sunday as roast; and, whenever you have the time on Sunday or Monday make a big chili colorado or curry -- something that will be better with a little rest -- freeze half of that for another time when you won't be OD'd on beef roast; and have the remainder on Tuesday or Wednesday.

    Left over roast makes great shepherd's and steak pies, too.

    Bon voyage,

    BDL
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I've always wanted to make shepherd's pie, good idea!  Chili would be good too.  Thanks for the ideas.
     
  5. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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      Oh wow...thanks BDL.  We just made a rib roast the other day as well, with leftovers in the fridge.  Shephard's pie sounds fabulous.

       dan
     
  6. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Except that...

    a Shepherd's pie is made with minced LAMB (hence Shepherd!)

    When you use beef it's called a cottage pie /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  7. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    So, then, is one made of:
    • "duck" a "lake pie", or
    • venison a forest pie, or
    • pork a sty pie, or
    • aw CUT IT OUT! /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
     
  8. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Ish,

    You wrote:
    As Nigel "George Bernard Shaw" Bruce might have written had he existed, "Two great nations separated by a common language, what?  What?"

    But alas lamb is not specific to shepherd's pie.  Not even in Jolly Olde. 
    OED2 on CD, 1994, cf from the entry for shepherd's; however, the OED defines cottage pie a bit more strictly:
    Id, at cottage pie. 

    Wikipedia is sort of trans-Atlantic.  In it's cottage pie entry, it says: 
    While here in America, Merriam Webster's Unabridged Dictionary defines shepherd's pie as,
    and in it's entry for cottage pie, merely cites back to its own definition for shepherd's pie.

    I'm nearly out of dictionaries, so, th... th... th... that's all folks!

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  9. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I knew you would refute my comments, BDL - I expected nothing less.

    Let's just say:  MOST people here in the UK continue to call minced beef (with or without vegetables) under a topping of mashed potatoes Cottage pie - and minced lamb under same topping Shepherd's pie.

    All the dictionaries in the world don't change what people ACTUALLY say or do.

    (PS - sometimes it would be nice if you would just say 'Oh, that's interesting, we don't say/do/call ......... (fill in your term of choice) it that here - instead of lecturing!)
     
  10. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    I agree with Ishbel that a shepherds pie is known since allways as made with lambmeat. Hence the prefix "shepherd", as in sheep + herd.

    In France they also have some sort analog pie, made with beef. They call it "hachis Parmentier".

    Back on topic to the OP: you could chop your big roast in chunks and make any stew you like. After that, divide in portions and freez again with no problems at all!

    You could make a bourguignon, daube de boeuf, carbonade flamande... etc. Fact is that these stews are allways made in larger quantities. They will taste better as they have to cook longer and flavors merge better when slowcooking.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  11. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    As much as I value BDL's vast knowledge and sage advice I have to go with Ishbel on this one.  We're all experts on something and this is Ishbel's territory here.

    Enough of the semantics.  I've never made neither a shepherd's pie nor a cottage pie.  How do I go about that?  First off is mincing the meat.  Is there an effective way to do this by hand as I do not have a grinder?  Recipes please.

    Chris Belgium, do you think eye round would benefit from low/slow cooking or will it toughen up like a bottom round?

    By the way, we had the roast last night.  I simply love this method of salting over night.  I cooked it for 1.5 hours at 225 and then left it in there with the oven turned off for another 40min.  For a cheap piece of meat this method makes a super tender roast beef dinner.  Served with roasted sweet potatoes and blanched asparagus. 
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  12. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Koukou, that's indeed another question, tender meat can indeed get very tough when slowcooked, no matter how long it stays on the stove or in the oven, it just gets thougher and tougher!

    I would go for very thoroughly searing the meat first. In fact, this is where most people make mistakes in making these stews; adding all or to much meat at a time in this first important stage of browning the meat. The meat will get steamed or cooked in it's own liquid -and toughens up. Also, your sauce will have little color. Correct browned meat will produce a nice dark color.

    It has to be seared without "bleeding" it's own juices when searing. Give it time to do it correctly: high heat, just a few at a time and brown them well all over. Then -when using tender meat- maybe not a too long cooking time at the usual low temperature.

    I usually have 2 items on the stove;

    - the cast iron pot in which is sweating onions, shallot and garlic at a low temperature.

    - a frying pan to sear the meat at high temperature, a few at a time as I just mentioned. The pan will also get a nice brown surface coming from the meat, don't worry about it, we will use that. You will have to add fryingfat from time to time.

    When a batch of meat is nicely browned, I transfer them to the cast iro pot, immediately put P&S on it and dust with flour. Idem for all the batches that follow. When done searing, turn the meat in the pot a few times and put the fire somewhat higher. The flour now creates a roux, so stir and turn a while. Don't worry if it looks not all that pretty, it will go away when adding liquid, but, first read the following;

    After searing the meat in the pan, deglaze your frying pan with the wine, or beer, or marinade... and let that liquid heat up nicely. It's also a known fact that pouring cold liquid over the browned meat will toughen it up!

    Now pour the liquid over the meat in the cast iron pot. The meat has to be just covered, some peaks of meat showing is fine, I mean not floating around in the liquid. Add some vealfond or even water if you don't have enough liquid to cover. Lid on, go to a low fire and have a few beers while your house smells like heaven. Enjoy!
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  13. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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    First off is mincing the meat.  Is there an effective way to do this by hand as I do not have a grinder?  Recipes please.

    KK, just go with a small dice. I actually prefer that style of dish made with diced meat, as it provides a mouthfeel I like better.

    Specific recipes are easy enough to come by. By I just treat it like a pot pie, using the potato crust instead of a paste.

    BTW, while white potatoes are the usual topping, don't hesitate to use other roots, either instead of, or in conjunction with, the spuds. For instance, a potato/turnip mixture.
    [*]....venison a forest pie, or.... [*] [*]Not to take anything away from your point, Pete. But in some locations, this style of dish, when made with venison, is actually called a Deerstalker Pie.
     
  14. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I often use swede turnip (rutabaga?) and potatoes on top of both shepherd's pie and cottage pie.

    Interesting comment re the deerstalker pie....  I bet here it might rejoice in the name of poacher's pie!

    Another refinement:  if you add cheese to the topping it is, for some reason, known as cumberland pie here.
     
  15. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Originally Posted by Koukouvagia  
    No need to take sides. 

    The "shepherd's pie" thing between Ishbel and me wasn't about either of us being right.  Rather it was a way for two people, one from the UK and the other from the US, who love the language and another sufficently to play "full contact."  I respect her literacy, her cooking and everything else about her greatly.  If it seemed otherwise... my bad. 

    BDL
     
  16. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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       How can a cottage/shepherd's pie be considered a pie at all.  It hasn't got a pastry bottom, or a pastry top.  It isn't rolled in an outer layer of grain.  A (Roman) placenta? ok...I get that it can be considered a "pie".  But how does the Shepherd's pie and cottage pie factor in as a pie?

      KYH...I'll have to try the venison forest pie too.  Have you got any tips?

      thanks,

     dan
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  17. gonefishin

    gonefishin

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       Hi Ishbel,

      You know...I haven't made a serious attempt at shepherd's pie in many many years.  I also haven't had the pleasure of having a good shepherd's pie out to eat.  I do order it from time to time in hope's that it will be good, but I usually have no luck in finding a good shepherd's/cottage pie.

        The mixture of rutabaga sounds like a nice addition.  With colder weather coming our way I think I'll try a few shepherd's/cottage pie recipes.

        thanks!

      dan
     
  18. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Gonefishing

    I hope you'll try to make a few cottage/shepherd's pies when the weather gets cooler in your neck of the woods.

    It's sad that you don't find good 'pies' where you live - I can get quite a few really good ones in local hostelries here!

    If you add cheddar cheese to the potato mixture it really adds another 'comfort' factor to the dishes!

    OF course, the ONLY way to eat the pie is with a huge dollop of HP sauce!
     
  19. kyheirloomer

    kyheirloomer

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     KYH...I'll have to try the venison forest pie too.  Have you got any tips?

    To show you how long this sort of thing has been going on, Mary Randolf has a recipe in her 1823 book, The Virginia Housewife. Historically, many of her recipes go back at least to the last third of the 18th century; from it's phrasing this is likely one of them:

    A Nice Little Dish of Beef

    Mince cold roast beef, fat and lean, very fine, add chopped onion, pepper, salt, and a little good gravy, fill scollop shells two parts full, and fill them up with potaotes mashed smooth with cream, but a bit of button on the top, and set them in an oven to brown.

    I merely adapted that recipe, using venison instead of beef, for my

    Deerstalker Pie

    2-3 cups cooked venison, diced small

    4 slices bacon

    2 onions, chopped

    2 carrots, shredded

    Butter

    1 cup thin brown sauce

    1/4 cup red wine

    Salt & pepper

    2 cups mashed potatoes

    Put venison in a baking dish. Fry bacon, crumble it, and add to venison. Cook onions and carrots in bacon fat over medium heat until onions are soft. Add to meat.

    Mix red wine with sauce and pour over meat & vegetables. Cover mixture with a layer of mashed potatoes, leaving an open circle in the middle. Dot potatoes with butter and bake at 400F for about 25 minutes, until top is browned.

    I bet here it might rejoice in the name of poacher's pie!

    Mebbe so, Ishbel. Which merely demonstrates that we are two people separated not only by a common langage but by cultural differences as well.

    In America, game belongs to the people as a whole, rather than to the landowner. So anyone can hunt deer, subject to rules established by the individual states. Such rules apply primarily to seasons and bag limits.

    To be sure, there is poaching in the U.S. But poachers, here, are considered to be criminals, not folk heros.

    Oddly enough, outlaw gunning in America is mostly associated with waterfowl, rather than big game. But there are historical antecedent for that as well.
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2010
  20. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    What is HP sauce?