The next step

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Joined Aug 13, 2000
Greetings all. I just recieved Crust and Crumb yesterday and am ready to start making some serious breads. I have a starter that is alive and well and can completely leaven bread. I have him in a five gallon bucket, about 10 liters or so, when I use it I take out 5l and make bread with it then refeed the remainder, so far it has worked well, but probably definately not a "world class bread", but good. So where can I get some bannetons, or what could I use, will cheap bread baskets work or do I need something specific, what do you use? ANy and all info is greatly appreciaed.
 
1,635
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
Isn't this stuff cool? As far as bannetons go, I bought them cuz' I think they look cool and I like the way the proofed breads look. I don't think they are necessary though. In The Bread Builders Alan Scott says he uses cheap collanders. They provide the same shape and the holes allow the needed air to get in. If you want bannetons, I have seen a wide range of shapes and prices. The cheapest I have found are at San Francisco Baking Institute. They have a bigger selection at Bridge Kitchenware.
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Nobody seems to have the 16" Ring Loaf crown basket I've been looking for.

ringl.gif


The last Ring Loaf "Couronne" I made, I used a 16" paella pan, placed a bowl on top, upside down, lined with a couple of tea towels. It worked but the bread was a little tricky to get out!

:rolleyes:
 
1,635
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
Kimmie, Why not just use your elbow (well floured of course)? We made the italian version in class on Monday. Formed the dough into a disk, put the point of my elbow into the center and spun the dough around on the table, using my elbow, until the hole was about 6" across. I love to play with my food :)
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Thanks Koko. Didn't find 16".

Found interesting site...in France!

Crown bannetons available from 500 gr. to 4 lbs. loaves. I will look into that. They are really beautiful.

:D
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
Fontzmark--If memory serves, you're the person who started this whole plethora of posts about starters and bread baking. I'm glad to see that the tangent we all went off on hasn't deterred you from wanting to go ahead and do this on a daily basis. Cultivate your starter according to Crust and Crumb, or the La Brea starter, and follow the formulas and you will have world class bread. The poolish on page 32 of C&C is very easy to work into a daily thing, make the poolish early in the am, let it stew for 3-5 hours, make a dough, ferment it, overnight it, then shape loaves and bake the next morning and you will have
ciabatta that looks like this

Good luck, good reading
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Dear Kyle,

Sorry for the delay, I just read your post. Steve Sullivan used the "perfectly clean" floured elbow in Julia's show. I do that too.

The basket is used to proof your bread, not to make the hole!
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[ July 18, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
Thank you. That stuff turns out to be so easy to make. If you've looked at Artisan Baking there's a ciabatta in there that's even more dramatic looking, but the dough is very wet and I'd hate to have to make 40 of them under the gun. I made an onion caraway rye today that I wish I'd taken a bigger piece of.
 
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
Ernest 1
Kyle 0

I have been humbled. I have had a slight case of overproof. The loaves deflated when I removed them from the baskets. I need to work on my timing. I have a question for greater minds than mine. The last two times I retarded my shaped loaves for extended periods of time, the formed a skin on the top/basket side. This made docking virtually impossible and added to the problem created by overproofing. The baskets were covered in plastic and each in their own garbage bag. How can I prevent the development of this skin?

Thanks
 
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Joined Aug 13, 2000
Thanks Kyle
I thought I had crossed one barrier and now this to look forward to? I am using Ms. Piggy(my own, original starter) and following Peter Reinharts directions, so eight 1.5 pound piggies took a big nap last night, I think they will be fine but my starter is very potent, I have been using daily, I pour off 4l of it to use to make bread, just add salt and flour and a little malt, had some pretty good results, but not a lot of sourness, then I feed the rest and leave it out overnight> When I put the loaves in the for the night they were getting pretty big. Is there something specific you should use for the overnight proof?, bannetons, colanders, bowls? For best results what should you use? Bannetons are expensive! WOuld regular baskets work, were you talking about cheap plastic colanders? Do the loaves need to breathe? When I take them out I set a sheet pan over two of them and slowly flip it over, that has worked in the past, I am guessing tomorrow is going to be a little more delicate!
 
1,635
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
Alan Scott uses plastic colanders. He says that the perforations allow some of the moisture to be wicked away from the crust, making it easyier to slash. He also suggests that boules don't have to be proofed "in" anything. They are happy on a parchment lined, inverted baking sheet. 8 loaves! That would take me a week and a half in my EasyBake oven :) Do you freeze them? Have you tried to thaw any?
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Fontzmark,

We use proofing baskets for the look, really, but they are not a vital part of the process.
 
29
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Joined Aug 13, 2000
Kyle,
Well Ms. Piggy gave birth to 14 really nice loaves the past few days, they looked much like yours, I do't think they overproofed though, they did not have a lot of irregular holes and such, a few but not what I was striving for, hopefully it will get better, the bread was a huge hit, with many complements, good flavor and a real good crust.
When I take mine out of the fridge, if they look dry and it appears they have a skin on them I spray a little h2o on them, does the trick, this will soften it up a bit. How are Frank and Ernest doing?
 
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