The hate about Global?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by thesean, Nov 15, 2018.

  1. thesean

    thesean

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    Hi All,
    First post here and I would like to thank everyone here first for all your wisdom in the forum. Its been great reading all the threads and I just couldn't help myself asking a question.

    I currently own a set of Global knives, and I just dont understand why everyone hates them here.
    Down under in Australia I got myself a set for $300 AUD last year, that includes a 9cm paring knife, 11cm utility, 16cm "sandwich"(more like a serrated utility), 14cm nakiri, 18cm santouku and 20cm chefs knife.
    Ill be honest, if they were full price I wouldn't buy them myself as, but having used them for a year I actually quite enjoy them. They can take more abuse then usual Japanese knives as they are softer (56-58 HRC), and I've used the chef knife to butterfly quails (which I believe would chip a traditional Japanese Gyuoto?) and cut up an butternut squash (Shun says doing that would damage their knives LOL).

    Would be interested to hear everyone's thoughts on both sides of the argument.
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Quote: (Shun says doing that would damage their knives LOL).

    They do?

    “For this heavier kitchen work, try the Shun Classic Meat Cleaver (DM0767), or Shun Classic 8” Western Chef’s Knife (DM0766), which are designed to handle more aggressive work in the kitchen, such as breaking down chicken and preparing thick-skinned vegetables like butternut squash or melons.”

    But to address your question... folks have their experiences, biases, and opinions. Sometimes facts are even considered.

    Welcome to ChefTalk.
     
  3. rick alan

    rick alan

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    BS can be very cute but, of course, we all know what BS is worth. And in the same respects as Global there is even more said about Shun on knife forums.

    Globals are not considered worth the money, very mediocre steel and grinds, so 300 seems quite an excessive amount for what you got. The same amount, including vat, could have got you a very nice 240 Japanese gyuto, a 150 petty/utility to match, and pairing knives are a Euro 10 cent a dozen for what Global offers, same goes for any serrated knives.

    That said, what, if anything, are you looking for in terms of knives?
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
  4. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    They slip in the hands of some people (including mine). That's pretty much the number one complaint about Global knives.

    They put you on edge and don't allow you to use them with a peace of mind. You have to constantly try to prevent them from slipping and cutting your fingers off.
     
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  5. butzy

    butzy

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    I got a couple of them and I am happy with them.
    But then, I have a number of different brands and types of knives from lowly Kiwi-knives to a JCK carbo-next and they all have their own strengths and weaknesses.
    If you are happy with them, then that's the only thing that counts!
     
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  6. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    The grips can be a problem like others have stated. Also when I had the chance to use one for butchering the handle became cold over time in the cooled kitchen making it uncomfortable to wield.

    Not sure if they are all like this but the ones I used also had tapered handles that felt like they thinned out too soon.
     
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  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I wasn't thinking about it before but most of the knives in your set are redundant or otherwise eliminatable. A good chef knife doesn't need a nikiri or santoku; a petty/utility ,which your serrated doesn't really count for, is needed; and a pairing knife, these are all that you really needed. As to toughness, Japanese knives can be had in steels to suite any preference.

    All of these criticisms, you did ask for, shouldn't diminish your enjoyment of playing around with your assortment of knives, but if you decide on additional knife purchases hopefully you'll come away from here better informed.
     
    Last edited: Nov 15, 2018
  8. benuser

    benuser

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    Globals have been introduced half way the eighties. In these days the general public only knew the big German names, thick, heavy and dull.
    The Globals were a revelation. Thin, light, sharp out of the box, with a to some appealing, modern design. Easily available. Soft enough to allow the common abuse. Users could go on with their poor habits.
    Since they are a bit outdated. Much better stainless knives have become available through distance selling, even to the general public.
    But for many, Globals have been a first introduction to better knives.
     
  9. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    On the positive side you are less likely to break off a chunk of the handle if you drop them, don't have to worry about the handle coming loose and could technically run them through a dishwasher if you so choose.

    At the end of the day the only person that has to like them is you. If you like using them don't worry about what other people think of the brand.
     
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  10. benuser

    benuser

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    I should add that sharpening Globals is no fun. Hard to raise a burr, hard to get rid of it. Big carbides in a soft matrix. The only soft steel I know that is capable of chipping.
    They come with a strongly convexed factory edge and can use some thinning right behind the edge to remain performant.
    On the positive side, I like a lot the profile of the G2. After some good thinning it's a great tool, within its limitations.
     
  11. loomchick

    loomchick

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    I own one Global knife. It's a 4" paring knife. Why did I buy it? I didn't have one and some people were raving about them . . . so I bought a small one. The first time I used it I didn't like it. Then I looked at the edge. I re-sharpened the blade to put a better edge on it and it improved dramatically. It's still not my favorite paring knife, but it's okay.
     
  12. benuser

    benuser

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    Had a GS-1 and didn't like the high tip. This little correction made it far more usable.
    [​IMG]