The forms of mustard

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I often use mustard in my cooking.  Sometimes dijon or other types of mustard sauce, other times mustard powder, and now recently I bought mustard seeds.  But I'm never quite sure I'm using either correctly.  I like roasted potatoes with mustard.  Usually I dissolve mustard powder or dijon in some lemon juice and pour into the roasting pan.  But not sure which one I should be using.  When do you use the powder and when do you use the sauce?  And what on earth to do with mustard seeds?
 
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I don't know as there are any hard and fast rules, KK. You go with what tastes best to you.

The primary difference between prepared mustards is the liquid used to form the paste. You can discover this for yourself. Take some powdered mustard and dissolve some of it in water, some in white wine, some in beer, some in vinegar. You'll immediately notice the difference in taste, even though you started with the same mustard.

Seeds are used when you want to add a hint of mustard flavoring. Most often it's used as part of a pickling spice mixture, for instance, and when you want a similar effect. That is, the mustard contributes to the flavor of the final product, but you won't necessarily taste mustard as such.

Personally, when I want a distinct mustard flavor, or when I'm using mustard as a base (as when, say, breading something) I go with prepared mustard. For a lighter flavor I use either powdered or, when appropriate, mustard oil.
 

phatch

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Don't forget mustard seeds in Indian cooking as part of the toasted spices.
 
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I tend to use Dijon or English mustards - the English ones I always use Colman's English mustard powder, or those by boutique mustard/pickle manufacturers like the English Tracklements company.
 
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Grind the seeds, add water and vinegar, homemade mustard. I use the cheap yellow mustard on meats before I add the rub when I am BBQing. Adds flavor and helps form a nice crust.
 
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I also use it as a glue for dry rubs, Mary. While there is a definate flavor difference, using it or not, I wouldn't say it was a mustard taste. But it's definately better.
 
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I have been wanting to try making mustard by grinding the seeds. I think that would be best done in a mortar and pestle. I have read that this produces an intensely spicy mustard, and I imagine it would have a texture like coarse ground dijon mustards.
 
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Don't forget mustard seeds in Indian cooking as part of the toasted spices.
Ditto that.  Maybe it would intensify the flavour of the mustard by toasting, then grinding, for use in a dry rub or the suggestions KYH made. Agreed, they do form a large part in pickling spices.

With made mustards, for hotdogs I prefer American mustard (as it's known here) as it seems to suit.  For sandwich dressings I like made wholegrain mustards.  For corned beef I like to mix in some Dijon with some mayo and sour cream - makes a great topping for potatoes and other veg too.

As mentioned above, give it a go, and see what works for you.  Per what eastshores said, mortar and pestle would be good if you want a texture, especially if you toast them first until fragrant.
 
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I find that when I use wet mustard to toss into roasting potatoes it tends to burn so I use ground mustard instead.  But with ground the flavor is not as intense.
 
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I use Guildens or Frenches for hot dogs, Reg.Dijon for rubs and Grain for my sandwiches. If you have a jar of each,, you can make whatever kind you want. I buy already made.
 
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I'd like to be a collector of mustards.  My most recent acquisition is a jar of harrod's english mustard.  I haven't used it yet.  Will it go bad if I open it?  I'm always weary of opening my the jars of my mustard collection for fear that I'll use them once and then they'll sit rotting in the fridge for 2 years.
 
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Almost all prepared mustards have either vinegar or other acids (i.e., wine) as all or part of the liquid, KK. As a result, they last two days longer than forever. So don't worry about it.

But you really should experiment with making your own, if you find mustards fascinating. There are all sorts of web sites with instructions and recipes.

Mustard is also one of those things with which there is sometimes no logical explanation for flavor changes. F'instance, Coleman's is nothing but mustard flour---that is, yellow mustard seed ground to a fine powder. For "English" mustard you mix it with water.

Why does it taste better than more generic mustard mixed the same way? That's one of life's little mysteries, because there is no rational reason for it. So, if you do experiment, don't just play with liquids. Play, also, with brands of ground mustard, and with different colors and grinds of seed to see how flavor is affected.
 
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Mr Colman said he made his fortune by what the British 'left on the plate'....!

I don't know why Colman's mustard powder is so good,but I use dry onto rost beef, in salad dressings (when I want a bit of bite) - with water to add HEAT to a roast..
 
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I don't know why Colman's mustard powder is so good

Exactly my point, Ishbel. Logically it should be neither better nor worse than any other mustard powder. The fact that it is better remains one of those things that makes you say hmmmmmm?
 
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You want mustard - he's got mustard!

http://mustardmuseum.com/

You can get any kind of mustard you've ever heard of - and a WHOLE LOT that you haven't  - from here. We visited about 10 years ago and I spent $75 before my wife grabbed me by the ear and dragged me out. I like mustard. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/licklips.gif

The founder, Barry Levinson, is an accomplished humorist, too. Note that you can buy a handsome diploma, suitable for framing, that certifies that you are a graduate of Poupon U.

In a hilarious essay, Barry, then a highly-regarded prosecutor in the Wisconsin State's Attorney's office, recounted his conversation with his mother - a fully-qualified Jewish Mother who was intensly proud of her Son, the Lawyer -  announcing that he was giving up the practice of law to... open a mustard museum. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif     I hope that essay is still available.

Anyway, I guess it has worked out.  He's moved twice, expanding each time. If you are ever anywhere close to Middleton WI, a visit will be most rewarding. Just don't take your wife, and you can buy as much mustard as you want. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif

Mike
 
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Almost all prepared mustards have either vinegar or other acids (i.e., wine) as all or part of the liquid, KK. As a result, they last two days longer than forever. So don't worry about it.
 
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I know this is an old thread but... I still like mustard!

You probably know that America's best-selling Dijon mustard (Grey Poupon) is made in New Jersey by Kraft Foods. Trader Joe's Dijon Mustard, on the other hand, is made in Dijon - of all places.  So in their Grainy Dijon. On a slight downside however: My last two jars of TJ Dijon have gone a little sour after 3 or so months in the fridge.  It seems that although I'm a real mustard fancier, I just don't eat it fast enough! 

Mike /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif

In the future, I'm going to try to do better.
 
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I know this is an old thread but... I still like mustard!

You probably know that America's best-selling Dijon mustard (Grey Poupon) is made in New Jersey by Kraft Foods. Trader Joe's Dijon Mustard, on the other hand, is made in Dijon - of all places.  So in their Grainy Dijon. On a slight downside however: My last two jars of TJ Dijon have gone a little sour after 3 or so months in the fridge.  It seems that although I'm a real mustard fancier, I just don't eat it fast enough! 

Mike /img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif

In the future, I'm going to try to do better.
I haven't tried TJ's but I do love the Maille brand of dijon.  I go through a jar per month for sure.  

That museum guy was recently on tv in a show about addictions.  They tried to make him eat ketchup and he got mad and stormed out.
 
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