The Flavor of Ajvar

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Joined Dec 21, 2005
Though we have made ajvar from our garden red peppers in the past, it is winter now where we live so we tried some jarred ajvar imported from Turkey in a recipe we were making. The ingredients looked pretty standard (roasted red peppers, eggplant, garlic, etc.), but we found the product to be unpleasantly bitter. Is this typical of real ajvar or of jarred ajvar or did we just get a bad product? We'd be unlikely to try the jarred product again if the bitterness is typical.
 

kuan

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There are so many different brands though. I have no idea what I buy because I can't read the label, but I find that mixing it with stuff like gojujang makes it even more awesome. :)
 
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The bitterness comes from the roasting of the red peppers but it shouldn't be unpleasant. It should balance the sweetness of the pepper.

Strange...maybe try an other brand? Don't give up ;-)
 
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Joined Jun 27, 2012
The bitterness comes from the roasting of the red peppers but it shouldn't be unpleasant. It should balance the sweetness of the pepper.

Strange...maybe try an other brand? Don't give up ;-)

I have never had a RRP turn bitter.
More likely it was the eggplant?

mimi
 
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There used to be a ton of Bosnians in my neighborhood--refugees re-settled during the Balkan wars of the 90s. The ajvar brands I've bought have come from the Balkans--Croatia, Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania. They've all been delicious. They've all been shockingly inexpensive, too. Only thing that makes mayonnaise-based tuna salad edible is a liberal blob of ajvar mixed in.
 
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