The decline of Canadian Dairy (among other)

175
73
Joined Jan 9, 2019
Our canadian butter, is controlled by the "Canadian dairy commission", now has the lowest standards ever..it was bad years ago..even worse now.
Cookie making is just weird, butter doesn't melt..it's like some weird*ss margarine.
Plus the "covid" price seems to have increased the price from $4 to $5.00/lb.. and all in one aluminum wrapped lump (canadian standard)..no, not sticks..too much work..you'll pay an
extra buck or two per pound for separate "sticks" of butter!

Another "covid excuse", "dairy is in demand now" so the dairy farmers are now feeding their cattle with palm oil supplements, all with the blessings of health canada.
The butter won't melt, milk and cream sours on or before the actual expiry date.
Google "buttergate".
The canadian dairy comission/health canada bans ALL resale imports of dairy products into canada, the only exceptions are cheeses over XXX days old, plus a massive tariff on
even those.

Raw milk in canada? Not!
https://bc.ctvnews.ca/b-c-raw-dairy-farmer-found-guilty-of-contempt-1.582114

Yes health canada, the very same entity that has banned mothballs, "because kids may eat them", but, they have no mention of the Tide pod challenge though...Shh!
Fruity pebbles, banned in canada.. because there's cartoons on the box, (they don't want commercialism) but hockey/olympic/jock pictures are just fine.
I'm sure rubber balloons will soon be banned.

/end food/socio/political b*itch

Thank you for reading..
Flames accepted
 
265
99
Joined Sep 21, 2010
I'm a Canadian, the above might be a slight exaggeration. In my experience, the butter melts. It gets plenty soft when the kitchen's warm, and around here, it's in the $3.50-$4.50 (sale prices. Butter has always cost more in Canada - thanks to the Dairy Commission). Again, in my area, you can get various local organic butters which are more expensive.

The Dairy Commission and its quotas, I agree, doesn't do consumers any favours. It's political. Perhaps that will change with the current 'free trade' agreement.
 
3,287
723
Joined May 5, 2010
I live across the river from Sault Ste Marie, Ontario. Your milk comes in plastic bags, as I recall. It's also radiated to last longer
 
265
99
Joined Sep 21, 2010
1. Canadian milk is not irradiated. Spices, potatoes, onions and wheat *might* be irradiated to stop insects or spuds/onions from sprouting.

Interestingly, the US is a major market for irradiated food, especially meat (ground beef) and shellfish.

2. Canadian milk comes in plastic bags. Really? Not in Vancouver where I live, though I think it came in plastic bags in the 1960s. It was very awkward, as I recall but not a health hazard.

Milk here comes in cartons, glass bottles or plastic jugs, just as it does across the border from me in Washington state.

Myths do seem to get around. Even though dairy is cheaper in nearby Washington state, I’ve heard Canadians say not to buy it because it’s full of hormones and antibiotics, unlike Canadian milk.

Some milk, in the US, Canada, Europe, can be UHF, or ultra-high-temperature heat treatment to make it shelf stable, but that's not radiation, and i rarely see it in the stores. Not that I'm looking for it.
 
265
99
Joined Sep 21, 2010
Fruity pebbles, banned in canada.. because there's cartoons on the box

Continuing to clarify myths --
Yes health canada, the very same entity that has banned mothballs
- Health Canada has not banned mothballs. In 2012, they changed packaging and labeling requirements. You can still buy mothballs.

Fruity pebbles, banned in canada, because there's cartoons on the box
Due to character licensing and copyright issues, the Fruity and Cocoa Pebbles cannot be sold in Canada at this time. Copyright is the cartoon-owner's issue, not Health Canada. IMO, no loss,.
The canadian dairy comission/health canada bans ALL resale imports of dairy products into canada,
All kinds of cheese can be imported into Canada, it's a WTO thing. Take a look at my fave cheese store - https://bentonscheese.com/. But I agree, it's pricey, though not 'massively' so.

Not saying I totally agree with the Dairy Commission, but in an international forum like this, we should try to stick a bit more to fact. And food!!!
 
5,538
976
Joined Oct 10, 2005
meh.... never have seen butter come in sticks but my complaint is that butter is still sold in 454 gr ( 1 lb) bricks and yet milk is sold by the liter. Where I work we get in two 25 kg cases of N.Zealand butter a week because its cheaper than the Cnd. butter

Like the ( now defunct ) wheat board the dairy commission rules supreme and heavy handed, fr'instance: Butter can not be commercially produced in B.C. ( probably not in other provinces other than Ont..)
Last time I was in Washington State and looked at a 2% milk carton, it had an ingredient list on it, I dont think Canada has stooped that low yet, but time will tell....
 
3,287
723
Joined May 5, 2010
Some milk, in the US, Canada, Europe, can be UHF, or ultra-high-temperature heat treatment to make it shelf stable, but that's not radiation, and i rarely see it in the stores. Not that I'm looking for it.
Thanks for this....I remember that, but over the border in Ontario, their milk does come in plastic bags. They sell a Tupperware like container the bag goes in
 
5,538
976
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Yeah, I remember those, The western provinces tried to implement that system back in the early '80's-- people hated it and it was never brought back. I think Ontario still has this, just keep in mind those milk bags are worse than water balloons if they slip out of your grocery bag....
 

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