The case against kosher salt

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
So in this context, kosher refers to the size of the grain. When you buy kosher salt, you know you’re getting a larger salt grain that is flat or pyramidal."
I don't know if it is a requirement, or not, for being called "kosher" salt, but all kosher salts that I know of (unless they have recently changed formulas) do not contain any additives such as iodine and anti-caking agents, and this is the primary reason I use it.
 
1,832
538
Joined Aug 15, 2003
It's ironic that humans spent literally 1000's of years in the pursuit of pure salt and invented ways to clarify and try and remove the impurities from mined and evaporated salt. Now we've come full circle where, for some reason, the purest of the pure forms of salt (i.e. kosher) is somehow seen as less desirable because now we want the impurities. It's really only in the last couple hundred years or so that salt has become as commonplace and pure as it has.

And yes, all salt is "sea salt" in the sense that it came from the sea at one point.

I assume I'm like most chefs here...I've mostly used kosher salt for almost all cooking in the kitchen, and only use the specialty salt for when I want to finish a dish...i.e. maldon salt, pink himalaya to finish a sliced steak for example.

I have shifted recently to a product called "Baleine" salt, which is a fine textured French sea salt. It comes in a blue container. I shake it right out of the container...I like it for what I do because it dissolves quickly on the stuff I am cooking. Doesn't really seem to have a "better" or more pure taste or anything. Has more to do with the size of the grains.

There is a great book out there called Salt: A World History that is actually really amazing. If any of you haven't read it I suggest picking it up. His other books are fantastic as well.

EDIT: (I tried putting a link to amazon in my post but maybe the site deleted it?)
 
4,043
857
Joined Dec 18, 2010
I don't know if it is a requirement, or not, for being called "kosher" salt, but all kosher salts that I know of (unless they have recently changed formulas) do not contain any additives such as iodine and anti-caking agents, and this is the primary reason I use it.
Apparently it's not a requirement since Morton Kosher salt has both anti-caking additives and a designation on the box: "Kosher for Passover, with the circle-U mark". Interestingly, though, my box of Morton has large cakes in it. :)
 
4,043
857
Joined Dec 18, 2010
Someday... I have not yet read that book (it's on my retirement reading list should I live long enough to retire). That story is right up there with (I believe his other books that you mentioned) "Cod" and "Pencil", the complete histories of... Fascinating reading that few can appreciate.
 
1,832
538
Joined Aug 15, 2003
Someday... I have not yet read that book (it's on my retirement reading list should I live long enough to retire). That story is right up there with (I believe his other books that you mentioned) "Cod" and "Pencil", the complete histories of... Fascinating reading that few can appreciate.

I can't recommend it enough. You'll enjoy it. Apparently after he did all his research for and had written "Cod," there was enough there for him to write a dedicated book about Salt as well, since until recently the vast majority of cod (and fish in general) was salt cod and the two are inexorably linked.
 
285
143
Joined Dec 30, 2015
I cook with sea salt, Himalayan salt, gray salt, etc., etc. because of the flavor and the mineral content. I've never thought of less processed salt as contaminated. In my mind less processing = good.

Interesting topic.
 

dogfood

Banned
27
9
Joined Mar 3, 2018
I use a plethora of different salt types.. Windsor pickling salt is my fave now..it's actually flake-like
Rarely, if ever, do I use Kosher though..due to the price & depending on the brand..may or may not contain weird-ass anti-caking additives (was always told it was not good for fermentation)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Top Bottom