The case against kosher salt

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What salt isn’t ultimately sea salt, even if it is from a sea that ceased to exist many millennia ago.

Bitterman...I love the guy but ultimately he needs to generate publicity to make money and stay relevant. Guys like him in the media say the darndest things to get noticed.

My only issue isssue with salt is that it doesn’t all weigh the same for a given volume and/or salinity so one needs to know the differences.
 
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I agree. The only bad thing about kosher salt is that different brands weigh differently. I wish it is standardized like table salt.
 

phatch

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He didn't make much of a case. If we applied the same argument water, we'd all have cholera and dysentery and more.
 
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And what he’s basically saying is that unknown and uncontrolled contaminants in our salt is a good thing. Weird.

Salt is a mineral. It is mined or extracted and processed. Some has more processing (less contamination) and some is less processed (more contamination). Clearly he’s trying to stir the pot by implying that sea salt is a naturally occurring mineral and other salt is a chemical. Weird... and incorrect.

But he’s smart enough to get paid for saying such rubbish while I’m not getting paid to comment on it. Maybe he really is the smarter person. Ha ha ha.
 
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All of the above are correct. Salt is salt, some is purer than others. If you use weight rather than volume it is all the same. I have hypertension and tend to use as little as possible. Because of this I find many places over salt their dishes. I don't think you can get too much salt on the rim of a drink glass.
 
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I hate Sel Grey(sp?) because it can be gritty tasting. Kosher salt has a nice crunch that dissolves. I can't afford the more expensive salts for cooking! I am broiling a steak for supper, a lot of the salt will fall off when I flip the steak to season the other side so why waste a good salt?
 
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That's an interesting thought brought up in that article koukouvagia koukouvagia
I'd like to add here that I think the food industry in general, uses WAY too much
salt in their preparations, all I taste sometimes is Salt and not the product.
I've had the same box of Kosher Salt in my pantry for, oh, I really
don't know how long. I've always just preferred the taste of
Sea Salt.
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It's been a challenge at times, since moving away from Hawaii, to find Hawaiian
Sea Salt, but when I do find it, I buy in bulk, I've got 6 of these in my pantry.
I can't remember what I paid for this 2 pound bag,
but I know it wasn't much.
I use it for everything, even brining, I suppose I'm just
accustom to it's characteristics. It's even on our dining table in a Salt Mill;
I don't use a ton of salt in my cooking to start with, so ...
y'know us old fogies have to watch our sodium intake :wink:
 
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I have a lot of different salts at my command all in small ramekins on my range's shelf, but the bigger ramekin is filled with Morton Kosher Salt. I don't over salt and I use different salts that have different flavor profiles for different dishes and finishing (like Cypress flake). If I'm salting water, or making a brine I'm not going to waste expensive sea salt(s).

Bitterman ought to take his motor out of his mouth and stick it up his but and move along.
 
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Kosher is the go-to general purpose seasoning salt. It dissolves nicely in water and in the mouth. Most “natural” sea salts are quite strong and simply used as finishing salts in the commercial kitchen. I think they each serve a purpose with various flavor and texture qualities.
 
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Kosher is the go-to general purpose seasoning salt. It dissolves nicely in water and in the mouth. Most “natural” sea salts are quite strong and simply used as finishing salts in the commercial kitchen. I think they each serve a purpose with various flavor and texture qualities.

I would beg to differ with you here... hrmn hrmn have you tried Hawaiian Sea Salt and I'm not talking about Alaea, the Red Salt nor the Black Lava Sea Salt-those are enhanced salts if you will by either clay or lava- me, I'll take it straight up, no chaser :)
 

pete

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Just my opinion, but why would you use more expensive "sea" salt in the cooking process? Most of the nuances that make "sea" salt desirable will be lost in the cooking process. I find a much better use for it as a finishing salt.

Now, when it comes to pickling and preserving I would never use "sea" salt as I don't know what impurities are left in the salt. These impurities can possibly cause off flavors in the pickling process, or possibly even wreck havoc during the fermentation process, allowing undesirable molds and bacteria to gain a foothold and ruin the ferment.
 
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Because I’m Greek. We only use sea salt in our cooking and we only use olive oil I our cooking. It’s just one of those things. I’m just used to it. Kosher salt has an odd taste to me, salt shakers at restaurants too.
 

pete

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Because I’m Greek. We only use sea salt in our cooking and we only use olive oil I our cooking. It’s just one of those things. I’m just used to it. Kosher salt has an odd taste to me, salt shakers at restaurants too.
Salt shakers, at restaurants, are almost always filled with iodized salt, which not only contains iodine, but often anti-caking ingredients, both of which do contribute flavors to the salt, and if you aren't used to it, it does make it taste strange. As to kosher salt having an "odd taste" all you are tasting is pure salt (NaCl), nothing else-no additives, and no impurities.
 
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An excerpt from

https://realsalt.com/what-is-kosher-salt-anyway/

"There’s a prevalent thought that kosher salt is so named because it is in compliance with Jewish dietary laws about food preparation and the types of food that may be consumed, and that perception is not exactly accurate. In fact, kosher salt isn’t even necessarily certified kosher—though if it is to be used in a kosher meal, it has to be.

What we commonly called kosher salt is actually coarse koshering sea salt, so named because salt of this size is used in koshering meat for adherents of Jewish kashrut (dietary laws). For some reason, the ing on koshering was dropped along the way by a few companies, and the change became the new normal. So in this context, kosher refers to the size of the grain. When you buy kosher salt, you know you’re getting a larger salt grain that is flat or pyramidal."
 
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A problem I do not have since Kosher Salt is not even a thing in Argentina :p

I've tried to get it because most recipes in English asks for it, and I would like to have as finishing salt.

I end up using regular table salt, sea salt or eventually Himalayan...
 
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