THE BOOK WISH LIST

444
10
Joined Jun 9, 2001
ok guys, here is my wish list. anyone have these books and like them or dont like them? let me know and feel free to suggest any other names as well. i would like to keep the books about bread if possible.

1- bread builders
2- crust and crumb
3- la brea bakery
4- ultimate breads
5- the enchanted broccoli forrest cook book (i heard there was a part of bread troublrshooting)
6- the new international confectioner (i am having problems getting this book)


i have:
1- speical and decoritive breads part one and two
2- the vilage baker
3-artisan baking across america
4- bread alone.
5- flat breads and flavors


i would like books that can teach me rather then just a book with all recipes (if that makes since)

feel free to suggest

thanks
 
579
10
Joined May 6, 2001
Isaac,
I have "The Enchanted Broccoli Forrest Cookbook". I really like it. They have recently come out with an updated version of it that contains color photographs (something I look for in cookbooks). The section covering bread teaches the basics of using a sponge and has notes on making variations in bread recipes. I enjoy Katzen's laid back aproach and personal illustrations. The other recipes in the cookbook are nice as well, and I find them simple to put together. My 4 year old (with a little help from me ;) ) can prepare a few of the dishes.


The La Brea cookbook isn't one I own, but I recently checked it out from the local library. I think it is a fabulous resource. The bread recipes start with her 14 day white starter and each one ranges in a 1 to 3 day period for completion. She is very detailed in her instructions. It's a wonderful book especially if you have never used a starer before. The photographs (with the exception of the inside cover) are black and white. I prefer color throughout, but that's me :p .


I currently am reading Bernard Clayton's "New Complete Book of Breads". It is fabulous. It covers a wide range of bread recipes and includes instructions for preparation with a food processor, hand mixer, and stand mixer. He cover's basic equipment for baking and in later chapters goes over instructions for building an adobe oven. The recipes even include treats for dogs, and he has a chapter on troubleshooting.


I also have "The Bread Bible" by Beth Hensperger. This book contains 300 of her favorite recipes. They include breads, waffles, and pastries. She covers "the art and science of bread making" and "essential methods and techniques".

"No Knead to Knead" by Suzanne Dunaway is an intersting read. It throws everything you've learned about "proper" breadmaking out the window. I have made the fougasse and really liked it.

If I were you I'd check the customer reviews on amazon for each of the books you are interested in and also check them out (if possible) from your local library first to see if you like them. With some cookbooks, even if the recipes are good the way they are written can effect how useful they are to you. I hope I've helped, and not bored you to death.... ;)

[ August 05, 2001: Message edited by: Svadhisthana ]
 
444
10
Joined Jun 9, 2001
thanks guys.

i try to stay away from books that jus have recipes. recipes are a dime a dozen. i love technique books and the "how to" books and i love the science of cooking books as long as it is not over my head.

iza: yes, the ultmate bread book is dfinitly on my list
 
186
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Joined Nov 10, 2000
Well, I guess I am partial to "Crust & Crumb" because the author was my instructor at The California Culinary Academy. A James Beard Awarded book. The book is very easy to read and easy to follow. He teaches very well in the book. Hope that helps. :D
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
You know Isaac it might better for you, and me, to do as Kyle suggest. Start with a beginner bread book: Ultimate Bread. I'm still waiting for my copy.

Starting at the begining will surely help you, and me, to understand the different steps of bread making and what is involve in each of those step. So in the end we will have a better understanding of the whole process.
 
1,635
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
Huh? :) I would love to take credit for such sage advice but I don't have that book, yet :)

I would have to vote for Crust & Crumb. I think it is a very informativ, approachable book. It does not speak down to you, but rather just over your head. I think it helps the learning process if you have to strain a little to grasp the subject matter. I really like his book.

[ August 06, 2001: Message edited by: KyleW ]
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
And my vote gotes to Crust and Crumb too. "Fifty master formulas for serious bread baker" How can you go wrong? And even though I've never looked at some of the other books mentioned, I'd bet dollars to doughnuts that they use cups, not lbs and ozs, and to me, a serious professional bread baker, that's not the way to go. Baking is a science, not an art, and why waste time even thinking about, do I dip and sweep, or spoon and sweep? Get a scale, get a calculator, learn baker's percentages, get some salt, flour, yeast and water and go nuts. Later on, when you can bake a loaf of bread, get the other books for their creative ideas.
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Well, as you all know, I'm very partial to Nancy Silverton. Thus, I have to go with Breads from the La Brea Bakery.

Bread builders is another great choice for the technical side of things.

Also, World Sourdoughs from Antiquity

Read customer reviews right here
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
Sorry Kyle I thought it was you who recommanded Ultimate Bread. Who was it then TBH? Kimmie?
 
415
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Joined Jan 15, 2001
I just got Crust and Crumb and I love it. The recipes in baker's percentages really help when you need to compare hydration and other ingredients in different breads. I find myself reading it more than Bread Alone. I would also like to get Silverton's and Ortiz's bread book.
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
It's Kokopuffs! Click here and scroll down the page

I totally agree with thebighat when he says get a scale, get a calculator, learn baker's percentages, get some salt, flour, yeast and water and go nuts.

:)

[ August 06, 2001: Message edited by: Kimmie ]
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Beware of this one:

«The Bread Book» is so comprehensive and the recipes so tempting that it's unfortunate to note that it is compromised by inaccurate quantity conversions and a repeated typographical glitch that obscures ingredient requirements in several recipes. Collister states that a cup of flour (no distinction is made among types) equals four ounces rather than about five, the standard equivalent for white flours. Thus, for example, 6 cups of white bread flour is stated as equivalent to 680 grams, while actual measurement shows it to weigh 822 grams--a difference of about 5 ounces. The cup or gram measure as given is, therefore, unreliable!


:confused:
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
I was looking at the professional section of the Village Baker last night and tossed it on the floor in disgust. Too bad, because as a wannabe graphic designer I think that book is very well done, but only some of the formulas are given in percentages. Too bad they didn't spend a little more time and money on editing. They do give a little disclaimer about the formulas,though, and he even says some of the breads only got tested once. I went looking for a book last night called Country Breads of the World, but couldn't find it. Anyone familiar?
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Here it is at amazon.com

It's from the same author as The Bread Book: Linda Collister. Still interested?

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386
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Joined May 11, 2001
I'm with Svad. I like Clayton's New Complete Book of Breads. This was the very first bread book I ever bought and I learned to make bread from this book. It is mostly recipes and definitely does not go in depth into the why's. However, the recipes are good. I've tried about 10% of the recipes (about 30 or so) in there and they've all turned out well except during my impatient days. Most everyone on ChefTalk has been mostly interested in artisanal or sourdough breads and that is just a chapter in Clayton's book. I started the cooked potato starter from this book last night. No action so far, but it's still early I figure.

I think I'll buy Crust and Crumb soon. I'm just waiting for my scale to arrive and string out all these new purchases. I think Peter Reinhart should start paying ChefTalk some commission ;)
 
799
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Joined Feb 21, 2001
I have an old copy of Clayton's Breads of France and have used that a lot, mainly in the past now. If you look at the pictures in the rolls section of the Complete Book, the hedgehog and the others, I made the rolls the artist used as models. She came into the bakery I was working at and asked and we said sure.
 

isa

3,236
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Joined Apr 4, 2000
What scale did you decide on Risa ?

I forgot to tell you, I was given a copy of The Bread Bible, you were right Risa, and you too Svadhisthana, it is a very nice book, lots of information and tips. It covers every kind of bread.

I made the focaccia, added fresh herbs and fleur de sel,insterad of the olive pesto. It was very good, disappeared so fast I couldn't believe it.

I can't wait to try another recipe, anything in particular you would both recommend ?
 
1,635
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
Here's one more for the mix, Amy's Bread by Amy Scherber. She owns 2 bakeries here in Gotham City. Oddly enough, they are called Amy's Bread as well. The book is a nice mix of teaching and really cool recipes.

[ August 10, 2001: Message edited by: KyleW ]
 
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