The April Monthly Challenge is Family Favorites

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Here is your chance to make the dishes Mom, Grandma, or Aunt May make and win ChefTalk glory and adoration (or dished from Dad, Grandpa, or Uncle Ben of course). Any dish that is very popular in your family qualifies as long as you make it this month. I'll do my best as judge, although I remember thinking I robed someone as judge on a prior challenge.

Happy Cooking!

The rules:
- The challenge begins on the 1st [3rd/4th this time depending on where you live!] of every month and the last entry must be made by the last day of the month.
- You may post multiple entries.
- All entries must be cooked during the month of the challenge.
- If you use a documented recipe, please cite your source.
- Entries should include the name of your dish and a picture of the final product. Sharing personal recipes and pictures of the process are not mandatory but extremely helpful. (Emphasis is mine, as it seems recipes would be particularly interesting in this challenge)
- The winner is chosen by the person who posted the challenge, and is announced after the last day of submissions. The decision is final and falls entirely at the discretion of the challenger.
- Submitting an entry makes you eligible to win. If you do not wish to be considered for the win you may still participate in the challenge, but make your wishes known to the challenger.
 
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What a great theme! My compliments to you, sir!

The US is strikingly underrated when it comes to local and regional cuisine aka "home cooking."

I will be entering a hometown favorite from where I grew up known as "Chicken Riggies." Those of you who are from the Central New York area know exactly what I am talking about. :)

Cheers!
 
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That sounds like it is time to make an Indonesian rijsttafel, with sate....
Or sauerkraut with bacon and sausage (zuurkool met spek en worst)
Or erwtensoep (pea soup)
Or or or....
 
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6FA6CC13-6F19-4E7C-94AC-D21BDC4B3F64.jpeg Oh good topic! I’m glad I can post right away because I indulged myself in some home made French fries yesterday. I don’t make them often but when I do I always remember my grandmother who made these for me and taught me how to make them. They’re not done the fancy way mind you, I don’t soak and then dry them, nope! They’re perfectly crispy if you ask me and the American way of doing that is not popular where I’m from.

I’ll go on a little bit about this because I’ve known that Greeks care about their French fries hardcore. I found this out to an even bigger degree last summer when I was visiting Krete. Now that I have celiac it is crucial I remain completely gluten free. That’s not hard to do in the NYC, most restaurants know how to cater to us but more often than not you won’t be able to find gluten free fries because restaurants cook everything in their fryers so they throw in mozzarella sticks, onion rings, and other breaded items which makes the oil unsafe for us who avoid gluten. When I visited Greece last year I thought it would be extremely difficult to have a safe experience at any restaurant. To my surprise there was not a single restaurant that did not have a dedicated fryer just for potatoes. They don’t necessarily do it to keep it gluten free, they just think it’s anathema to cook potatoes in anything else.

Alas, my Greek fries :) Giagia’s method:
These are 3 Idahos, hand cut of course. I use a risotto pot and fill it halfway with oil - 3 parts EVOO, 1 part grape seed oil. I place in one potato to test the hotness of the oil. Once it bubbles and browns a little I remove it and dump in all the potatoes. It bubbles up instantly and I let it for one minute. Then I turn the heat down down to medium high and allow the potatoes to cook gently for one more minute. At this point I take my soup skimmer and stir the potatoes and press them down. Yes!! This causes some tears and injuries to the potatoes and these little bits crisp up like you wouldn’t believe. When the bubbles start to die down I crank the heat back up for a minute and remove the fries onto a platter lined with paper towel. Sprinkle generously with sea salt and voila! And THIS is the reason that Greeks don’t put ketchup on their potatoes - they’re so delicious and perfect they don’t need sauce!
 
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sgsvirgil sgsvirgil I love some Chicken Riggies and am very curious to see how you prepare yours. Unfortunately, Even though I grew up around Utica, it was not a staple in my household so wouldn't be a "family favorite" for me.

I have a few things in mind, but have had a non stop parade of house guests for the last month and don't get my house back until late April. So, I don't have much time to put a good entry together, but I really look forward to seeing what others come up with.

Nice choice Hank Hank
 
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hmmm, I have a chuck roast left and that is a childhood comfort food... carrots and potatoes cooked in with the meat of course!
 
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View attachment 66351 Oh good topic! I’m glad I can post right away because I indulged myself in some home made French fries yesterday. I don’t make them often but when I do I always remember my grandmother who made these for me and taught me how to make them. They’re not done the fancy way mind you, I don’t soak and then dry them, nope! They’re perfectly crispy if you ask me and the American way of doing that is not popular where I’m from.

I’ll go on a little bit about this because I’ve known that Greeks care about their French fries hardcore. I found this out to an even bigger degree last summer when I was visiting Krete. Now that I have celiac it is crucial I remain completely gluten free. That’s not hard to do in the NYC, most restaurants know how to cater to us but more often than not you won’t be able to find gluten free fries because restaurants cook everything in their fryers so they throw in mozzarella sticks, onion rings, and other breaded items which makes the oil unsafe for us who avoid gluten. When I visited Greece last year I thought it would be extremely difficult to have a safe experience at any restaurant. To my surprise there was not a single restaurant that did not have a dedicated fryer just for potatoes. They don’t necessarily do it to keep it gluten free, they just think it’s anathema to cook potatoes in anything else.

Alas, my Greek fries :) Giagia’s method:
These are 3 Idahos, hand cut of course. I use a risotto pot and fill it halfway with oil - 3 parts EVOO, 1 part grape seed oil. I place in one potato to test the hotness of the oil. Once it bubbles and browns a little I remove it and dump in all the potatoes. It bubbles up instantly and I let it for one minute. Then I turn the heat down down to medium high and allow the potatoes to cook gently for one more minute. At this point I take my soup skimmer and stir the potatoes and press them down. Yes!! This causes some tears and injuries to the potatoes and these little bits crisp up like you wouldn’t believe. When the bubbles start to die down I crank the heat back up for a minute and remove the fries onto a platter lined with paper towel. Sprinkle generously with sea salt and voila! And THIS is the reason that Greeks don’t put ketchup on their potatoes - they’re so delicious and perfect they don’t need sauce!

Those fries look totally delicious koukouvagia koukouvagia . I think we are off to a good start.
Okay, what is/are chicken riggies?
Obviously I understand the chicken part, but.....

I recon riggies is rigatoni. This dish is not familiar to me either,
 
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That sounds like it is time to make an Indonesian rijsttafel, with sate....
Or sauerkraut with bacon and sausage (zuurkool met spek en worst)
Or erwtensoep (pea soup)
Or or or....

Excellent - I'd love to know more about South African cooking. The Indonesian thing threw me a bit but I gather its a Dutch dish?
 
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My mother, as I recall, was not a stellar cook. Sure, she kept us fed but I don't remember much about her food. Her mother, Grandma Lutz, however, was a good cook. She had a restaurant called Lutz's Country House outside of Dowagiac, the little town in Michigan where I was born.

But one thing I remember about Mom's cooking is the trays of chicken wings. This was back around 1960, long before the Anchor Bar up in Buffalo. Back then they were really cheap, a great way to feed a half dozen hungry kids.

20190403_201214.jpg

Basically she made several baking trays full of wings that were cooked, then brushed with sour cream and sprinkled with Italian dressing mix before going back in the oven to finish. At least that's how I think they were done, there may have been some dried herbs sprinkled on as well. I do remember they were tasty. So I whipped up a small batch.

20190403_213355.jpg

Very nice. These could have used a bit more sour cream and about 5 minutes less in the oven, but I still scarfed them down quickly. Quite tasty, and finger lickin' messy as I remember them.

mjb.
 
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Excellent - I'd love to know more about South African cooking. The Indonesian thing threw me a bit but I gather its a Dutch dish?

I wasn't born and raised in Southern Africa (I actually live in Zambia), so not much chance of seeing those. That's a more recent thing...
The Indonesian thing is what I grew up with as my dad was born in Indonesia (then Dutch East India)..... So, when everyone in the Netherlands was only eating potatoes, veges and meat, we ate rice and all other dishes (at that time Chinese take away was considered very exotic. How things change)
 
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I wasn't born and raised in Southern Africa (I actually live in Zambia), so not much chance of seeing those. That's a more recent thing...
The Indonesian thing is what I grew up with as my dad was born in Indonesia (then Dutch East India)..... So, when everyone in the Netherlands was only eating potatoes, veges and meat, we ate rice and all other dishes (at that time Chinese take away was considered very exotic. How things change)

Sorry - I go confused as I knew you were in Africa somewhere and the Dutch connection made me think South Africa. So they are Dutch dishes that you listed?
 
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I wasn't born and raised in Southern Africa (I actually live in Zambia), so not much chance of seeing those. That's a more recent thing...
The Indonesian thing is what I grew up with as my dad was born in Indonesia (then Dutch East India)..... So, when everyone in the Netherlands was only eating potatoes, veges and meat, we ate rice and all other dishes (at that time Chinese take away was considered very exotic. How things change)

Now every town seems to have an Americanized Chinese buffet! New one opened in the town I grocery shop in. Stopped to eat with a friend that I take shopping(she is 75 and doesn't like driving). General Tso's chicken was American, very little heat... hey what is this! Mongolian beef and I can see peppers in it! That one was definitely NOT Americanized! Nice level of heat! Actually had me sweating and I am a chili head so used to hot stuff.
 
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9D7FD67C-C525-4FE1-BBA5-FD986B5D5470.jpeg This is my mom’s recipe of a well known dish although it is made in various ways throughout Greece.

GIOUVARLAKIA

For the meatballs
1lb ground beef
1lb ground pork
1 onion
1 clove of garlic
2 handfuls Carolina rice
1 egg
2 handfuls of fresh parsley and fresh mint
Salt and pepper
3-4 quarts of chicken stock

For the avgolemono
3 eggs
3 lemons

Combine the ingredients for the meatballs and form the meatballs. Allow them to chill in the fridge. Heat the stock to a simmer and drop the meatballs in one at a time gently so that they don’t break apart. Allow them to poach gently for 30-40 minutes.

In a mixing bowl mix the eggs and juice of 3 lemons. Gently temper with the chicken stock and pour the tempered eggs into the broth.

I made a cornstarch slurry and thickened the broth slightly.
 
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Albondigas con salsa de Guajillo
Meatballs in Guajillo chile sauce

Served with white rice (not shown) and a bakery fresh Telera roll 052D3745-0348-4097-B7ED-25DAADF7001B.jpeg

Sauce:
Guajillo chile
Tomatillo
Onion
Garlic
Salt

F8FDAFE2-4576-4666-85C5-C00153C6E4B9.jpeg 9FC1E9D6-11CA-4A5E-8EBD-A2FDF997CDBA.jpeg
Toast Chile (stems and seeds removed) in oil
D5F89949-FEA1-460A-AB98-F6250F8D4A5B.jpeg
Boil until soft
9BD8D07A-3E29-4130-91B0-BAF85F679BD2.jpeg
Blend until smooth
3BB6DBEB-DD27-4B4B-A3A4-1D4A13A3C6B7.jpeg
Reduce
CF91C9F1-5F90-40FA-9136-877F4473B9C5.jpeg

Meatball:
Beef and pork
Breadcrumb
Finely minced onion
Salt and pepper
Egg.

Mix, portion and roll
6D2C38E4-DD60-42A9-B86B-C71CE5C45D95.jpeg
Stew in sauce with epazote
FB27F1ED-2636-4E58-91F6-A1D1E36D178B.jpeg
 
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