the 2 job juggle

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Joined Mar 10, 2004
Im working 2 jobs right now. As the summer approaches, it is getting harder to organize shifts. Does it work for anyone else to have 2 jobs? I am at the point of making a pros and cons list to help me sort out which job to keep. Is the convience of commuting worth picking up bad habits of the chef? Is money more important than knowledge? Is a chef with a strong accent easier to work for than an angry chef? can i fulfill my requirements without being commited? the end is near, i can feel it.
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
wow, choices choices choices.....I've evolved numerous times throughout the years each evolution has to do with growth skills or money....as your thread implies there are several things to consider. I personally would not want to be around angry people, life is too short. There are more options than you mentioned....there is always the possiblity of yet a totally different job.
Good luck, I would figure out where you want to spend 12 hour+ days.
 
866
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Joined Apr 28, 2003
I have 1 job with many tasks (customer service, print shop, company store, on-call aid for building maintinance) and its a pain. For example, right now I'm sitting at customer service desk with a print job to colate (put in order) and later today, a shipment of new product is coming in for the company store which needs to be thrown into storage ASAP or it all melts (ice cream and frozen product). All while Nestle's maintinance is requesting my help with several computer moves, employees moving to new cubicals on different floors.

:eek: I don't get paid enough :cry:
 
94
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Joined Mar 10, 2004
Shroomgirl: one place uses morels and one place uses white button mushrooms. choices.
what is your opinion on short stays at each job? my previous jobs, in order of date, are 9, 7, 2, and 6 months. If i take off to find another job, i am displaying a flighty habit.Although not uncommonin the industry, for me, it is time to settle down. I want to choose one or the other.

HC, what are factors for dividing your time? i am relatively new to linework, and am thankful to have a chef who consistently straightens my plans. Organizing my time is my biggest challenge. can you relate your desicions to me as advise?
 
866
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Joined Apr 28, 2003
Essentially, which ever department needs me more or which gets priority over the other. For example, Nestle is currently implimenting a project thats been years in the making code named GLOBE, a standardization of how the company operates on an international scale. In the print shop, their jobs takes presedence over all other departments other than the CEO. So if the print shop is understaffed (as it currently is) and they have a huge print job (which they do), I work there.

Essentially, my advice is to look at which job is more important like a linecook over the prep station. If 1 falls behind and requires more help, switch jobs.
 
7,375
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Joined Aug 11, 2000
I still maintain that the atmosphere in a kitchen is more important than most other elements. If you are having a good time and learning that beats out angry every day in the week. I cannot function in a hostile environment....nor would I care to.
Bouncing around is not great on a resume.....but before your roaming days are through, make sure that is where you want to be 12+ hours a day.
THERE are alot of opportunities for people that can cook. :)
 
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Joined Mar 8, 2004
I agree with shroomgirl that bouncing around is not good for resumes, but you can learn so many different things from different chefs. This is what I do to help that. The job I am at now, I have been at for over five years and started as a breakfast cook and moved my way up to sous chef. The shortest period of time I've been at a job, not counting part time extra income jobs, is three years. About 2 years ago when I wanted to move out of a line cook position into a leadership roll, the hotel I am currently working at told me they had no position for me to move up to. That meant it was time for me to look elsewhere. I printed out my resume, it wasn't very long because I was only 23 and like I said the shortest peiod of time i stayed with a job was three years, but with in a week I had a job as the banquet chef at a different hotel. They told me the reason the hired me so quikly was the length of all my previous employment. I gave my current job a two weeks notice, but also told them that I would stay on part time on an on-call basis. Those two weeks were very long because I was working both jobs practically full time. The day after my last day of my two weeks notice, the first job fired the executive chef, promoted th sous chef, and called me offering the sous chef postition. I did immediately tell the new job but told them I had not made up my mind. The first job said they would keep the postion open for me until I made up my mind as long as I was there helping the now over worked exec. chef, the new job offered me more money. What to do. So I exhausted myself and worked both for six months until I made up my mind. I could have made a little more money at the second job but I just didn't feel it. I was strictly banquets there and if the catering director didn't book parties (like she did for the entire month of Feb. because she was too involved in NACE) I would end up doing things like serving continental breakfast for the hotel. Probably the highest paid continental breakfast server in the city, but not what I wanted to be doing. So I gave them a months notice. They of course offered me more money but I appologized and turned them down and told them that the money wasn't an issue. Business, staff (or lack there of at the second job), travel time, and learning experience meant so much more. So I went back to the first job for a little less money, 10 times more work, and 100 times more satisfaction. Because I never left payroll I didn't have to start over with vacation and benefits and the length of stay is that much longer on my resume.

So my advice if you made it through my long winded story, pick the job that will satisfy you the most for your needs, stick with it but if you have the urge to jump around do it part time while you still keep the first job. If and when you leave any job don't burn any bridges, you may need to go back over them.

P.S. Also in agreement with shroomgirl pick the one you would like to spend 12+ hours a day at. I don't have the time to take on a part time job any more even if I wanted to.
 
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Joined Mar 10, 2004
dont burn bridges.

If you think you should not be saying what you are about to say, dont say it. Silence is bearable, some words are not. I made the choice, and importantly, the doors are still open. Im at 6 nights a week. lack of hours wont be a problem. I went for the better managed kitchen. The monkey is off my back and i can relax.
 
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