Thanksgiving Cooking Challenge November 2019

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If ever there was a month that lent itself to a foodie challenge more than November.... I present:

THE THANKSGIVING COOKING CHALLENGE
This month is like the foodie Olympics, everyone is testing recipes and prepping for T-day. I expect everyone around here to contribute something to this one. Are you pre-making pie crusts? Are you trying to decide between brown gravy or white gravy? Are you making stuffing or dressing? Are some of you out there harvesting veggies and fruits for the big day? I want to see what you got. Hopefully the interesting part of this challenge is seeing what everyone does with leftovers haha! Happy cooking!

Traditional Thanksgiving Foods
Roast turkey
Stuffing
Gravy
Butternut Squash Soup
Potatoes
Candied Yams
Green Bean Casserole
Cranberry sauce
Brussel sprouts
Dinner rolls
Corn
Pumpkin Pie
Sweet Potato Pie
Pecan Pie

The Rules
  • The challenge begins on the 1st of every month. The last entry must be made by the last day of the month.
  • You may post multiple entries.
  • All entries must be cooked during the month of the challenge.
  • If you use a documented recipe, please cite your source.
  • Entries should include the name of your dish and a picture of the final product. Sharing personal recipes and pictures of the process are not mandatory but extremely helpful.
  • The winner is chosen by the person who posted the challenge, and is announced after the last day of submissions. The decision is final and falls entirely at the discretion of the challenger.
  • Submitting an entry makes you eligible to win. If you do not wish to be considered for the win you may still participate in the challenge, but make your wishes known to the challenger.
  • The winner’s bounty includes praise, virtual high-fives, and the responsibility of posting the next month’s challenge. That entails choosing a theme, posting a Challenge thread that includes the guidelines, checking in on the submissions regularly during the month, and promptly choosing a winner at the end of the challenge.
 
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Eish, that's a tricky one.
We don't do thanksgiving here and I wouldn't know what the "traditional" dishes are....
Any suggestions? (Still got a butternut lying around)
 
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Nice. I'm sure I've related the sad and sorrowful tale of the first Thanksgiving I spent with my wife, celebrated at her parent's house in Phoenix. I believe it was 1985.

Canned vegetables

Instant potatoes from a box

Gravy from an envelope


A turkey that was, uh, let's just say it fit well with the stuff mentioned above.

I will boast, however, that it took a few years, but I managed to show them the light. Such that one year Karen had some commitments at work, major funding proposal deadline, and decided to spend the time at home. Her younger sister was not to be daunted, though, demanding I appear to prepare the meal, and paid for my airfare. That might have been the year I did the saffron butter under the turkey skin.

This might be a good time to research some early immigrant meals from the time of the Pilgrim's arrival, or go way off on a tangent to tradition, or ???

mjb.

3396831_4.jpg

mjb.
 
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Eish, that's a tricky one.
We don't do thanksgiving here and I wouldn't know what the "traditional" dishes are....
Any suggestions? (Still got a butternut lying around)
Oh of course, for our friends that are outside of the US, Thanksgiving is our most important food holiday which revolves around roast turkey and autumnal vegetables. I have edited the challenge to include a list of typical dishes found on Thanksgiving tables around the country. Many Americans like to replicate their Thanksgiving year after a year (my contribution is corn pudding and they demand I make it every year) while others try to jazz up their feast with new recipes while sticking to the basic formula of turkey and trimmings.
 
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This might be a good time to research some early immigrant meals from the time of the Pilgrim's arrival, or go way off on a tangent to tradition, or ???

mjb.

View attachment 67010

mjb.
What a sad sad story, glad that had a happy ending. I remember the 80's were all about boxed and canned foods.

Yes, please go off on a tangent, this challenge is supposed to be limitless.
 
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Eish, that's a tricky one.
We don't do thanksgiving here and I wouldn't know what the "traditional" dishes are....
Any suggestions? (Still got a butternut lying around)
Well, Thanksgiving is a time of giving thanks, of appreciating and honoring the things in your life which make it better. Thanks for things that make you a better person, things that bring joy, things that present the beauty around you in so many ways. Pick something in your life for which you are thankful, and create a dish that celebrates it. Like a casserole made with a can of green beans, a can of mushroom soup and, uh, maybe not that.

mjb.
 
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I love how one option is "potatoes." Perfect.

So are these suggestions or categories? Can we do non-traditional seasonal foods?
 
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I love how one option is "potatoes." Perfect.

So are these suggestions or categories? Can we do non-traditional seasonal foods?
Whatever you want to serve for Thanksgiving. All homes do it differently. I added the list for butzys sake, and anyone who is not familiar with American Thanksgiving.
 
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This month is like the foodie Olympics, everyone is testing recipes and prepping for T-day.
Not everyone! :) You know what - we don't have T day in the UK at all. Most people here would not know what it was. So, I am liberated. I can take time time without a care in the world, imagining and inventing what I would make - and also what I might do with leftovers.
 
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T-day leftovers are magical - like an artists paint kit. This is a no brainer for us Yanks we all have family recipes that are handed down. Sometimes I'll throw a wrench in the gears with something new and people go like "hUH???" . . . then they taste then they dig right in. Do a little reading on the subject, watch a few Youtubes and before you know it you'll be giving thanks for all that L-tryptophan while dozing off in front of the Tele watching cricket, or whatever is on this time of year. (for me it's watching the Detroit Lions choke in the bottom of the fourth quarter . . . )
 
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Not everyone! :) You know what - we don't have T day in the UK at all. Most people here would not know what it was. So, I am liberated. I can take time time without a care in the world, imagining and inventing what I would make - and also what I might do with leftovers.
That’s the spirit! In return I’m willing to learn a little something about Boxing Day.
 
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Or one can challenge themselves to make it right!
Hmmm....

Some folks I know have an annual Thanksgiving gathering that has been going on for some time, decades I think. Anyway, the person who hosts that year's gathering does the turkey. The attendees bring everything else. No dishes assigned, no categories presented, just bring something tasty. One year they had turkey and green beans. Each and every guest brought some sort of green bean dish. Given that this gathering is 800 miles away I rarely attend. The all green beans one might have been interesting. Oh, and lots of wine involved as well.
 
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2000 my inlaws bought a gorgeous ski house and we decided to have Thanksgiving there.
The housewarming present from us was buying them a new gas grill for the place.
That came in handy as when Thursday arrived and I find out that nobody had bothered to move any kitchen wares. I had a few saucepans. I ended up putting the turkey on the gas grill. I had to use a Swiss Army knife and piece of 2x4 as a knife and cutting board for stuffing and all the sides. Dinner for 14 actually turned out wonderful, as we dined on folding chairs and deck furniture in the dining room...because the house was still empty.
 
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Reminds me of the first Thanksgiving in our son's house next door. They hadn't finished it enough to moved in yet and my mom and sister were visiting from Michigan that year. I "borrowed" some folding tables and chairs from the college and everyone brought food, signed their names on in a 2x4 that eventually got covered (time capsule)) and it was a magical holiday - one we still talk about from time to time.
 
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That’s the spirit! In return I’m willing to learn a little something about Boxing Day.
Don't you have Boxing Day in the US? I'm a Canadian - we have Thanksgiving in October, and also Boxing Day. What do Americans do on Dec. 26, if not figure out what to do with all those leftovers?
 
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Don't you have Boxing Day in the US? I'm a Canadian - we have Thanksgiving in October, and also Boxing Day. What do Americans do on Dec. 26, if not figure out what to do with all those leftovers?
We do not have Boxing Day in the US. It’s a regular business day.
 

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