Thanks... now what utensils ??

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by kernels33, Oct 4, 2002.

  1. kernels33

    kernels33

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    If I use stainless, should I use metal utensils (metal against metal)??

    How bout if I use seasoned cast iron?

    Thanks again,
    Mike

    :p
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I Just Like Food
    With cast iron, I like metal. The surface of cast iron isn't really smooth and the metal utensils seem to do a better job to me. I sometimes use wood or plastic if that's what's clean.

    On stainless I prefer the various quality plastics and wood. Metal utensils mar the smooth finish. I only use plastic and wood here, with the exception of tongs.

    Phil
     
  3. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Whatever is on top in the utensil drawer. :D

    I "abuse" my stuff horribly, but it always comes through for me. I cook to make the FOOD look good; how the pans end up looking is not so important, as long as they still work.
     
  4. kernels33

    kernels33

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    Thanks Phil. Suzanne, you don't know how much I needed/wanted to read the following words from your answer:

    "I 'abuse' my stuff horribly, but it always comes through for me. I cook to make the FOOD look good; how the pans end up looking is not so important, as long as they still work.

    After scraping bottom with steel on stainless the other day, I saw so many permanent skid marks I thought I ruined my pan.

    After reading your words, I feel confident again. Thanks mucho
    :D

    Mike
     
  5. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Hey, if a stainless steel pan can't take a little poke with a sharp edge, how is it gonna deal with 1000 degrees of heat???

    And the only bad thing that can happen to cast iron is it might rust a little -- so you re-season it. Big deal.

    (I guess I belong to the last generation that expected stuff to last forever ;) )
     
  6. kernels33

    kernels33

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    Yeeeeeeeeeeeeee ha!!

    I'm in that generation too, Suzanne. Glad you're here to straighten out my thinking though. It's really all quite new to me actually :)

    Mike
     
  7. panini

    panini

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    Suzanne,
    I can't believe what I'm hearing!!!!!! I hope I'm not the only one around here that's anal about their tools and pans.
    If your having to scrape burnt crud off the bottom of a stainless pan, I'm thinking you have abused the food as well.

    Just kidding Kernels33:D
     
  8. alexia

    alexia

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    Susanne, I'm with you: equipment should accommodate us, not v/v. That's what warranties are for! (and if your LC has spauled on the bottom from high heat, LC will replace it).

    It's also a good reason to shop outlet sales and discount house kitchenware. I bought some AC at their half yearly sale. The "you have to look real hard to find" dings disappear among the ones I'll put there over time.
     
  9. panini

    panini

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    Ok. I think it is time for a survey.
    Maybe someone will post one. I'm starting to feel really old.
    I don't even want to read this tread aloud, for fear that my mentors will turn over in their graves. Even in our commercial kitchens the rules are to treat the copper and stainless like a 1 month old. or else you'll be using cheap aluminum that you buy.
    But then again, it's just me:rolleyes: :crazy: :beer:
     
  10. alexia

    alexia

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    Panini. I can't speak for Susanne, but when I say "abuse" I don't mean that I willfully harm my DEAR little pots. ;) Much of the cookware and equipment in my kitchen will soon be antiques.

    It's just that in the course of things I sometimes do use metal implements in them. For anything that is soft enough, my preferred instrument for pushing stuff about is either wood or a high temp resistant LC scraper (scrambled eggs, esp), but I use tongs all the time and occasionally a metal spatula for something like a delicate piece of fish, eggplant, etc. that tongs can't manipulate. I find that when the heat's right and the pan's heavy, things seldom stick enough to have to pry them off the pan, even eggs.

    My real hazard in the kitchen is forgetfulness. I will occasionally leave something unattended with ugly consequences. Even then, I find soaking or "cooking baking soda" will often eliminate the need for much scouring. and a clorox solution is a great grease cutter. When I do resort to scouring and cleaning powders, Barkeeper's is my friend, it even keeps copper clean with minimum elbow.
     
  11. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Panini, I'm talking about HOME use. PLEASE!!!!!!! So the pan gets used to make dinner, gets soaked overnight, then what little bit that's left (if any -- almost everything always comes off my AC and LC interiors) get rubbed off, the pan is washed, ready for the next use maybe that night, maybe a few days later. Anyway, I didn't really mean burnt-on crud, just the inevitable sticking stuff like the starch from the rice. I haven't burnt anything in years (not since I let the water boil out of a pot of lentils; I despaired of every getting the AC stainless interior clean, but after an overnight soak and the lightest scrub with brillo, good as new!)

    I'm certainly NOT talking about use in the restaurant! :eek: where pans get turned around every few minutes (if we're lucky and the dishwashers are on the ball).

    So the overall "abuse" is really very little.

    Copper? Isn't that another name for the officer who arrests you? I am WAY too lazy to have any copper pots; so I'll only eat zabaglione out. ;)
     
  12. kernels33

    kernels33

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    As you can see, I'm loving this >>>>> :bounce:

    <sitting>
    <watching>
    <thinking>
    <learning>

    Yeeeeeeeeeee ha! Thanks ;)
    Mike
     
  13. panini

    panini

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    I wonder Suzanne.
    My next question is, are your pots and pans male or female?? I'm thinking your pans are male. You know this is MUCH deeper then just cleaning!!!!:D :D

    All of my pots and pans are female. The only peice of male equipment I have is my cast iron skillet.:rolleyes:
     
  14. suzanne

    suzanne

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    Wow, good question, Panini! :look: :look: :look:

    Hmmm -- I guess female (like me) because
    • they always perform perfectly under the toughest circumstances;
    • they are outrageously, unbelievably forgiving;
    • they do exactly what I ask/tell them to do, without ever talking back to me;
    • they know that their job is to produce a good-looking outcome, and they DO;
    • they're kind of on the heavy side, but know they're still attractive because they've got what REALLY matters. :D
    This isn't gonna turn into another "battle of the sexes" now, is it?? :lol: