term "86"

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cesarzap, May 1, 2002.

  1. cesarzap

    cesarzap

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    Hi, I will like to know what is the origin of the term "86" as it is used today in the restaurant industry.:bounce:
     
  2. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    I was thinking about your question and couldn't come up with an answer. Asked a few people and they couldn't remember. The only number I know the meaning of is "187" that you hear in some songs these days, which means officer down. Don't know why THAT popped into my head.

    Ill ask around but I think Cape Chef or Athenaeus may know the answer. Maybe it was a military term?

    Jodi
     
  3. thebighat

    thebighat

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    I think it maight be something to do with the military in origin. Used to work with a guy who had cooked on a submarine and I have a vague recollection of him talking about it.
     
  4. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    Hmmm.....That's what I figured. The police dept. and military use code numbers to associate with procedures. So that seems to be the most likely scenario.
     
  5. svadhisthana

    svadhisthana

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    I found this website. I hope it helps.
     
  6. shawtycat

    shawtycat

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    Maybe I should just email someone at the history channel or Food Network! One day we will find out! :D :lol:
     
  7. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I have heard different stories for this, but the one I hear the most often has to do with Delmonico's in NYC (the original). Supposedly, they had 85 items on the menu, thus no item numbered 86 so that was the number used to designate items that had been sold out. I have no idea how true this story is, but as I said this is the one I have heard the most often.
     
  8. dlee

    dlee

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    cesarzap,

    There is already a thread on this topic in the archives. I think my response was; the term 86 came about because the garbage can in the army was a diamiter of 86 inches. So to 86 something is to throw it out.
    If I remember right there were a few other answers.

    D. Lee
     
  9. katew

    katew

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    This is what I found at dictionary.com

    eight·y-six or 86 (t-sks)
    tr.v. Slang eight·y-sixed, or 86·ed eight·y-six·ing, or 86·ing eight·y-six·es or 86·es
    To refuse to serve (an unwelcome customer) at a bar or restaurant.

    To throw out; eject.
    To throw away; discard.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    [Perhaps after Chumley's bar and restaurant at 86 Bedford Street in Greenwich Village, New York City.]
     
  10. marzoli

    marzoli

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    I've heard 86 used the same way as "deep six the whatever it is" as in burying it. Funny how much graveyard imagery shows up in funny places!
    Now you can deep six my post!:D
     
  11. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    Can someone give me an example using the term 86 in a phrase?
     
  12. thebighat

    thebighat

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    It's 8:45 on a busy Friday night. The saute guy realizes he just took the last veal special out of the saute box to start it for table 18. He sings out, to everyone in general, "86 the veal special!" A groan comes out of the collective wait staff. This is the third Friday in a row those albanian dummies have run out early. Now they all have to explain to the salivating hordes, who are already annoyed because the air conditioning is broken and the mandatory water ban means they have to ask for water, that the veal special is gone for the night.
     
  13. suzanne

    suzanne

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    OR:

    You keep a chalkboard just inside or outside the kitchen, where the waiters (but not the customers) can see it. The board is labeled: 86s. On it you list the regular items that you should have, but don't. To stop the waiters from taking orders for them. Of course, you still have to tell the waiters repeatedly, because you cannot assume they know how to read. ;) (Not necessarily my opinion, but sometimes true, alas.)
     
  14. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Don't forget about "Chumleys" downtown
     
  15. matthew357

    matthew357

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    Welp, working in a kitchen where the fish is flown in fresh every day and sold by the pound we 86 a lot on any given night. I have no clue where the term comes from...but I'll ask tomorrow at work.

    Matt
     
  16. kylew

    kylew

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