Take My Recipes and Run?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by arsenic, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. pembroke

    pembroke

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    I echo Foodpump, it's like I said earlier, we all need to move on and develop, develop, develop. None of us are any better than our last meal, and I'm sure we all want our next to be better:chef:

    Leave the recipes, good riddance-they only worked for the last kitchen, your new place will be better, have nicer equipment, more refined customers etc....:chef:
     
  2. caterchef

    caterchef Banned

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    :talk: 40/ 50 years ago a Chef was hired for his ability to manage and improve the kitchen operations not to just maintain the present operations. The salaries offered me improved 500% in 8 years because I could build a business with my ideas and when I left I took those ideas with me so his brother-inlaw or nephew or son could not maintain what I did. One place I went back 3 times and always for more salary. If I had written down procedures or trained my replacement I would not have been offered a chance to go back because I could do what they couldn't. And I always gave at least 2 weeks notice when I left so they all knew I would never walk out on them. not like today, I have seen chefs walk out or get fired and turn around get a job across the street and get a job. That would have never happened back then.:mad:
     
  3. pembroke

    pembroke

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    I worked as Exec Chef at The Garden House Hotel in Cambridge (now the Hilton Double Tree), when I left we had 5-stars for food safety, the kitchen was a centre of excellence and the food was great.

    One year later and the reputation for food was spiraling downhill and the kitchen was awarded NO stars by the health inspector. They had gone through 3 exec chefs and most of the chefs I worked with had left because they were discontent.

    My point, it's the chef that makes a restaurant/hotel kitchen run well and not a SOP manual full of recipes......I thought that was obvious????????:confused::confused::confused:

    (unless of course you're not a very good chef to begin with......)
     
  4. caterchef

    caterchef Banned

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    :( You need to explain that to the General Managers "across the pond" because The CMA gives them the idea that they alone and "Kitchen Bible" or the "SOP manual" run the kitchen. And they expect you you to train your Sous Chef to be ready to take over at any time.That's why I stopped being a "Executive Chef" and became a "Catering Chef/Owner" I could not bring myself to "brown nose " just be the Top Chef in the kitchen. I didn't need the grey hairs only my beard is grey.:)
     
  5. even stephen

    even stephen

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    Leave "your" recipes behind. I worked for a large group of restaurants for
    a good 12 years. When I was younger the owner came in and had a bowl
    of soup. Out of the blue, he said "Steve, this is one of the best soups I've
    ever had". He then proceeded to tell me, "but, if you don't have a recipe, and none of the other cooks or chef can make it, it's worthless". He walked out of the kitchen. I have always kept composition books with all the recipes for each restaurant I've worked in....some mine some the restaurants.....have about 6 now....I've never felt it was dishonest.....and have never been denied access to recipes. Enough was left out insofar as procedure and order to make them difficult to recreate, unless you'd actually made them......Pastry recipes are the most difficult. Although it's tough.....always leave with a smile and express your gratitude.
    It the way it should be done.
     
  6. pembroke

    pembroke

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    Fortunately I don't need to explain anything as I don't answer to a corporate GM or anyone other than my Bursar; who expects great food and sets realistic budgets.:)
     
  7. caterchef

    caterchef Banned

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    :( When I was younger I took a job working for a Chef who was training the owner's son how to cook and next year guess who was Chef and guess who was looking for another Chefs position. Well, he only knew what the Chef had taught him and got an attitude so, three other cooks and I left. When you are hired as the Head Chef you are not hired to train them every thing you have ever learned, only to bring up your menu everyday.And if the owner ever asked me me for recipes, I just told them I don't use them, he will have to come in at 5 am if he wants to watch me make soup. :suprise:
     
  8. a_mak

    a_mak

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    One thing to think about if you take your recipes is that wouldn't people think that you were just copying the recipes from your old restaurant? After all, they wouldn't know you were the one who actually created those recipes, not unless you have a known reputation which you probably don't. That's one reason I would leave your recipes.
     
  9. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Yeah, that's pretty typical of the hospitality biz here, and probably why both you and I have our own businesses.

    I learned that the job of a Chef was always expendable.....Just as a Chef always second-guesses and has back-up plans for each and every employee 10 minutes before thier shift starts, the Chef should always second-guess thier employer and keep an eye out for a plum-mer job: Once the kitchen is running smoothly and is making money, your job is done. If I was hired to clean up a mess and get good food out the door, and paid what I negotiated, I deliver. Yes, that includes recipies, but hey, I'm not spending countless hours and materials creating some wonder-dish. Besides, once I left, I almost always could "cherrypick" staff left behind when they called me up and whined about the new Chef or the owner.
     
  10. duckfat

    duckfat

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    I can't imagine leaving and "taking" the recipes as in not leaving any thing behind. Just make copies for yourself. Irrespective of whether you use them or not in the next restaurant you may want one of them years down the road. Just be professional. If you have a contract you wouldn't (or shouldn't) even be asking.
    It seems like a non issue to me. How many of us have recipes that other Chefs we have worked with have given us? I was looking through my file just the other day and came across a recipe I was given years ago from Windows on the World.
    Hope the new job works out well.