TABLE TOP DOUGH SHEETER????

3
0
Joined Jul 25, 2020
i WOULD LIKE TO START MY OWN CATERING BUSINESS BUT i NEED TO BUY A REVERSIBLE DOUGH SHEETER TO MAKE VIENNOISERIES.
MY BUDGET IS $4000. i FOUND THIS ONE USED : Bakers Best SFB500 Table Top Dough Sheeter IT LOOKS LIKE FROM ITALY OR AN OTHER ONE : OMCAN.
ANYONE KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THOSE. THEN THE COMMERCIAL KITCHEN IS TELLING ME SHE CAN ONLY HAVE PHASE 1 FOR DOUGH SHEETER. WHAT IS PHASE 1 FOR A DOUGH SHEETER PLEASE?
AND IF I NEEDED ANY PARTS TO REPLACE FOR THOSE DOUGH SHEETER , CAN I FIND THEM IN THE USA.
THANKS A LOT
 
719
264
Joined May 25, 2015
"Phase" refers to the type of power required by the machine. Large equipment like ovens and mixers can require 3 phase 208/240V power which must be available in the building. You are being told that the building or space only has single phase 120/208 or 120/240V power available.

However, I don't think a sheeter is going to require anything other than regular 120V power especially for a table top model. But since you say this is used I would check with wherever you are thinking of buying it from. It's possible that if it came from a foreign country the power requirements won't be suitable for operation here.

This is a big mistake restaurants make even with new equipment. And the sales reps don't know much more either. They don't understand the power requirements and order equipment from, say, Italy. Then they can't understand why it might not be able to be used here when they get it without spending as much or more than they paid for the equipment to provide it with the power it requires, if it's even possible. Costly mistake.

Most manufacturers build equipment for the world market these days, and if something is not "universal", meaning that it will operate from whatever you plug it into, they will have a specific model made for your Country and the power you have available. But you have to make sure they are supplying you with the right model.

-Hal
 
3
0
Joined Jul 25, 2020
i WOULD LIKE TO START MY OWN CATERING BUSINESS BUT i NEED TO BUY A REVERSIBLE DOUGH SHEETER TO MAKE VIENNOISERIES.
MY BUDGET IS $4000. i FOUND THIS ONE USED : Bakers Best SFB500 Table Top Dough Sheeter IT LOOKS LIKE FROM ITALY OR AN OTHER ONE : OMCAN.
ANYONE KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THOSE. THEN THE COMMERCIAL KITCHEN IS TELLING ME SHE CAN ONLY HAVE PHASE 1 FOR DOUGH SHEETER. WHAT IS PHASE 1 FOR A DOUGH SHEETER PLEASE?
AND IF I NEEDED ANY PARTS TO REPLACE FOR THOSE DOUGH SHEETER , CAN I FIND THEM IN THE USA.
THANKS A LOT
 
3
0
Joined Jul 25, 2020
thank you first so much for your reply!!!!!
If on a budget as mentioned , what recommendation of a brand for a Reversible table top dough sheeter(phase 1) should I be looking into living in los Angeles???
I really would like to get my side business starting with viennoiseries!! There is a lots of Chinese dough sheeter outhere?? or lots of absolete dough sheeter !! would it be as an other option worthy to look into those used rondo offered from ebay or craiglist coming out once in a while? how long of a usage of a used rondo or good dough sheete would be safe ( like 15 years ok or less?)
thanks so much
 
5,397
856
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Most table top shelters are 3 phase, but the newer ones have a built-in phase converter..

If you buy used, you need at least a 6 mth warranty on the machine, if the supplier is unwilling to do this, 5hen you need to either buy new or find another supplier.

There are some good Tiawanese (NOT Chinese) brands out there.but don’t know the names of them off hand

For all sheeters , this is what you need to look for:
Good forwar/reverse controls.
Thickness setting MUST lock in place when the belts are moving
Scraper assembly must be well designed, easily removed and replaced
Dealer must stock spare belts and scraper assembly parts

Rondo sheeters are well built and parts for older models are usually available, not too sure about older Asian Brands. American brands do not compare in quality or ease of use with European brands. If you buy via craigslist or internet you will have to find your own solutions for repairs or parts, this is why buying used through a dealer is a safer ( but more expensive) option

How long do sheeters last? All depends, some I’ve used are over 40 years old and run perfect-every day. Some are only 3 years old and have been abused badly—like running frozen heads of puff or croissant dough through them- and will cost more to repair than they’re worth.

Talk to a local electrician, most of them can find you or install a phase converter for smaller tabletop sheeeters. It’s not hard to do, but does cost money.

Hope this helps
 
65
10
Joined Dec 29, 2019
i WOULD LIKE TO START MY OWN CATERING BUSINESS BUT i NEED TO BUY A REVERSIBLE DOUGH SHEETER TO MAKE VIENNOISERIES.
MY BUDGET IS $4000. i FOUND THIS ONE USED : Bakers Best SFB500 Table Top Dough Sheeter IT LOOKS LIKE FROM ITALY OR AN OTHER ONE : OMCAN.
ANYONE KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THOSE. THEN THE COMMERCIAL KITCHEN IS TELLING ME SHE CAN ONLY HAVE PHASE 1 FOR DOUGH SHEETER. WHAT IS PHASE 1 FOR A DOUGH SHEETER PLEASE?
AND IF I NEEDED ANY PARTS TO REPLACE FOR THOSE DOUGH SHEETER , CAN I FIND THEM IN THE USA.
THANKS A LOT
A sheeter is not required for viennoiserie.
When you start to produce 500 daily its nice to have as a time saver.
Most caterers just buy frozen minis.
 
5,397
856
Joined Oct 10, 2005
The o.p. wants to make croissants and danish, make them, not open a box. You’re not actually suggesting he starts laminating 4 and 5 kg heads by hand are you?

If everyone sells the same ( deleted)-ing Danish from the same supplier, what good is that? Quality is the same, the only thing you can compete on is price. I don’t know about you, but I hate that old “ how low can you go?” Strip tease. Make your own, you have something different and can charge a price that actually makes money because you have something the other guys don’t have.
 
65
10
Joined Dec 29, 2019
The o.p. wants to make croissants and danish, make them, not open a box. You’re not actually suggesting he starts laminating 4 and 5 kg heads by hand are you?

If everyone sells the same ( deleted)-ing Danish from the same supplier, what good is that? Quality is the same, the only thing you can compete on is price. I don’t know about you, but I hate that old “ how low can you go?” Strip tease. Make your own, you have something different and can charge a price that actually makes money because you have something the other guys don’t have.
He wants to make money.

I rolled multiple 20 lb slabs of croissant dough almost every day and double on weekends.
30 years by hand, 20 yrs with sheeters.
Danish is just a whole lot easier.
Puff dough is just as simple.

8 yrs owning a catering business taught me what people are willing to pay for and its not extra quality, they like it but won't pay. I also worked at big catering operations, putting out 15 weddings in one day.
What I observed is quality is not the most important thing, the sell, the venue and the 'show' is where the money is made.
 
5,397
856
Joined Oct 10, 2005
My experience was that 99% of breakfasts I catered to were at client’s offices or at a venue of the clients choosing. The ones who wanted a decent croissant knew they had to pay for it, and they did. These were invariably law firms, investment firms, and wine merchants.

You must have forearms like a silverback, I never rolled out heads of puff by hand—never had the time. I used my sheeter for everything: Foccacia, cinnamon rolls, puff, croissants, quiche-lotsa quiche, cookies, but also marzipan, Italian nougat, caramel, and even buttercream icing.
 
65
10
Joined Dec 29, 2019
My experience was that 99% of breakfasts I catered to were at client’s offices or at a venue of the clients choosing. The ones who wanted a decent croissant knew they had to pay for it, and they did. These were invariably law firms, investment firms, and wine merchants.

You must have forearms like a silverback, I never rolled out heads of puff by hand—never had the time. I used my sheeter for everything: Foccacia, cinnamon rolls, puff, croissants, quiche-lotsa quiche, cookies, but also marzipan, Italian nougat, caramel, and even buttercream icing.
I can't get fresh yeast for croiss up here in the northwoods of Maine but I did manage to throw a batch of puff dough together, I got curious how long it really takes to roll all 1200 layers after watching a few youtube videos. 2 to 3 days was the consensus, what are the odds they're all wrong? impossible.
But they are all wrong.

my cell phone can't edit video so everything is done in one take, start to finish is 23 minutes with a couple minutes to finish a tray of danish between folds.
 
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