Swearing in the professional kitchen, Yes or No?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by welldonechef, Jun 2, 2015.

  1. It depends on the use of the language.

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  2. No! I run a respectable kitchen!

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  3. Yes! What happens in the kitchen stays here!

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  1. welldonechef

    welldonechef

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    If you have been in any professional kitchen, chances are you have heard a few f-bombs dropped here and there. Today I throw the question at you: Do you allow swearing in your kitchen?

    I admit it, I have a mouth like a trucker.

    I get wrapped up in what I am doing, and sometimes I just let my emotions go, and the swearing follows. It wasn’t until I gained the position of Executive Chef that the swearing got in the way.

    Truthfully, the reality shows like Hell’s Kitchen highlight what the language in the kitchen is really like. Gordon Ramsey may be a foul-mouthed chef, but despite that he is still popular.

    It was nothing for me to swear at someone. Of course, when you are neck-deep in the emotion of the situation, it is easy to forget that you are actually wounding someone with your words, even if they are careless on your side.

    From now on, I will not allow swearing in my kitchen.

    I recently read that several of my idols did not allow swearing in theirs. Auguste Escoffier, Marie Antoine Carême, and other prominent chefs did not allow swearing in their establishment. Apparently there are benefits to this, something which I would like to research and explore.

    For now, join me in an impromptu poll: Swearing in the kitchen? Yes or No? What do you think about all this? 
     
    wellspiritcook likes this.
  2. jamesdoulane

    jamesdoulane

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    One could be crude and cruel without swearing, or one could be kind and motivating using the most foul language. To me it's part of the esoteric parlance used among a well formed crew. Honest talk helps teams meld and it has been used for centuries in military training. It's fire and knives in a kitchen not cubicles and HR guidelines.
     
  3. canele

    canele

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    it depends...

    swearing  at the food or problem.... yes.

    swearing at each other.... NO.
     
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  4. spoiledbroth

    spoiledbroth

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    It's a kitchen, not a tea party :D
     
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  5. linecook854

    linecook854

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    Is this for f*cking real? Of course I swear by swearing.

    All jokes aside I do see some benefits as to not allowing it. Creates a more professional environment and things are taken with a bit more seriousness when something is said in a certain way.
     
  6. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    My father always said that swearing just showed a lack of vocabulary...as usual, I obviously didn't listen very well.
     
  7. panini

    panini

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    I was fortunate to study with some of my European idols. I heard swearing in the kitchen all the time. It wasn't until I got home and asked for a translation that I realized they were cussing at me/img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  8. jim berman

    jim berman

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       It's a rite of passage. When the intention isn't with malice or pointed, it is a way to talk. Of course, when customers are around, blue talk is taboo. Sometimes, a little punch of colorful talk can break the tension. 
     
  9. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    For emphasis.  I mean, when it's the third time and you really mean it what else can you say?  I'll write you up for moving too slow.
     
  10. meatball matt

    meatball matt

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    Swearing seems as natural as holding my chef knife. It comes with the job and usually it breaks tension. I don't agree with swearing at a person when mad, but when we are joking around we don't hold back on the swearing or crude/lude jokes about one another.

    I would lose a bit of respect for someone who is a professional and can't articulate what they mean to convey to someone without swearing and beating them down about it. A professional chef/cook, in my opinion, still has to be a professional and just because we work in an industry with loose morals it is not a free pass to kick, verbally, less senior people when they screw up.

    Just my two cents.
     
  11. just jim

    just jim

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    Profanity is a crutch for inarticulate M****r F*****s.
     
  12. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Swearing?  In My kitchen?

    Swearing a'la Ramsay is sooo crude, so predictable, and so boring, F-this, Sh*t that, etc.

    People, we are artists, creators of new and exciting things, we don't need old boring stuff to get our message across.

    Say, for instance a cook is moving too slow.  The standard expletitive would be something like "Move your (deleted) arse".  Bore-ing!  there's no real initiative there for creativity, about as bland as fried ham steak with a pineapple ring.

    Instead, say something like " You know, I've seen heroin addicts on the nod move faster than you, are you going to get any work done today?"

    or

    "You call that clean?  The raccoons leave my garbage cans cleaner than that when they go diving for the moldy Kraft single slices  at the bottom of the can"

    That's not to say we can't use bodily function or fluid comparisons to get our message across, but there is a protocol, and proper terminology.

    For example:  "What did you do to that lemon curd?  It's so sour it'll pull my foreskin right through my rectum"

    or

    "What do you mean you want a side of risotto, but with no extra charge?  I wouldn't give you the little wisps of steam from my morning dump without charging"

    or

    "You've been texting for 10 minutes now, and you've already had your break and you  still want to get paid for this?  You have your head so far up your rear, your sphincter muscle thinks it's your tongue"    

    But to swear like Ramsay?  Nah, no creativity, no class.
     
  13. mised

    mised

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    Swearing? I've never heard a "True" professional swear in a professional environment.
     
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  14. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    First, admittedly, I have not worked in a professional kitchen. I have worked with a union, contract and supposed manual.

    Personally, (and I am not a prude),  I would not want to be around co-workers that repeatedly spew profanities. It indicates a lack of respect (and perhaps an anger problem), to those around you.  One can do whatever one wants to do in their own home, but when on the job, one should conduct themselves/behavior appropriately. 

    I have watched Kitchen Nightmares.  At first, I turned it off.  Once I got past the language, I enjoyed the show, to a certain extent.  It is "reality" TV. It may make for good viewing & ratings,  - i.e. drama, cursing, dysfunctional, angry behavior, but one can make a point, without going to extremes.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2015
  15. onthebeach

    onthebeach

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    I'm going to try this approach. It can be so hard to hold back when you want to tell someone exactly how much of an incompetent f-ing idiot they are at times. Swearing at the situation releases the frustration without sending anyone home to cry into their pillow. I struggle to find the balance between being the authority and being kind to people. 
     
  16. akat

    akat

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    only the waiters wear a white collar, feel me ?
     
  17. canele

    canele

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    lol... you need to learn the scathing looks.... the eyes over the top of your glasses.... the disdainful smirk.  When your crew lives in terror of "the look" that is all you need. They know they have disappointed you.  Think...the devil wears prada movie.

    Oh i agree...i want to just cuss some of them out at times but wont.  I have also cussed the ovens and hobarts into the dust. Woe betide the plastic wrap or foil that is not rolling out becasue its hanging up on the edges......

    Allowing your crew to cuss each other out is not good for anyone.... but letting frustration out is very good in my opinion.
     
  18. just jim

    just jim

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    Slightly different note: Anytime I drop something I give it the finger for betraying me.
     
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  19. seabeecook

    seabeecook

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    I lead by example and do not swear myself. Rarely can you catch me use swear words. As a result, most of my summer staff withhold swear words around me. Yes, I hear 'F' bombs on occasion, but as a rule we run a clean kitchen (double meaning!).
     
  20. bob the chef

    bob the chef

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    NO there is no need for it .Just shows a bad command of the English Language.Yes we work in a very high pressure environment and sometimes we might let fly but not in the normal conversation side of things.