Sushi rice and vinegar

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by totte, Jul 17, 2016.

  1. totte

    totte

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    Hi, hopefully this is the right part of the forum for this kind of question. I just feel the need to know, love this kind of information when it comes to food and cooking.

    I'm not very good at Sushi, I've only tried making it once. However, my mum made Sushi this weekend with some friend and she mention they just boil the rise and sliced the salmon raw with no preps.

    So I'm wondering, don't you usually put vinegar in the rice? Isn't that to prevent health hazards as the vinegar cooks the salmon to some degree?
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Vinigared rice is the sushi! But I think it is for flavor not to "cook" any raw fish that is used.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
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  3. totte

    totte

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    Ye, but it is there for any other reason than the taste? :D
     
  4. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Not that I've ever heard. Other than tradition perhaps. Plain rice sushi would be rather bland.
     
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  5. chefross

    chefross

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    Hi Totte.....The word Sushi means "sour rice"

    Sushi rice is made by rinsing and soaking the rice, then cooking on low to allow it to absorb the water slowly.

    A mixture of rice wine vinegar, Sake, and/or Mirin (Sweet rice wine), and sugar are heated to dissolve the sugar, then added to the already cooked rice and fluffed.

    Sushi rice with fish is called "Nigiri Sushi)

    Fish alone is called Sashimi

    The fish is not "cooked" or made safe by the vinegar.
     
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  6. totte

    totte

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    The kind of answer I was looking for, great information! Thanks!
     
  7. cooky16

    cooky16

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    aaaaaaah! sake! and mirin! thanks for suggestions , was trying to think what they used as I had forgotten the names...! which is more widely available? 
     
  8. chefross

    chefross

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    Sake is rice wine, and Mirin is sweet rice wine. If you have neither you may substitute.

     Add between 1 and 2 tablespoons of sugar to 1/2 cup of white wine, vermouth, or dry sherry to replace 1/2 cup of mirin.
     
  9. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Sushi started as a way of preserving fish for a few days, this the vinegar. If you don't use vinegared and sweetened rice, it's not technically sushi.

    BUT

    The flavor of sushi rice varies a great deal regionally and by preparation. For instance, Kansai (Kyoto/Osaka) you tend to get sourer rice than Kantō (Tokyo), but sushi is also a lot less common in Kansai. In Kyoto you're more likely to get sliced fish with plain rice on the side (sashimi, or in Kyoto otsukuri).

    Fish may be plain, lightly salted, lightly pickled, torched, seared, etc. Seasoning on nigirizushi and makizushi may include wasabi (usually fake) or not. Dips for sashimi may be ponzu, soy, Tosa joyu (dashi-enhanced soy, aged), etc.

    So do what you like and don't worry.

    As to sake and mirin: it is not difficult to get acceptable if mediocre sake, e.g., Gekkeikan. It keeps well so get a big bottle. Real mirin can be much more difficult. If the ingredients list is more than 3 items, it's almost certainly fake. Use sake and add sugar as a substitute: fake mirin is like that "cooking wine" you see in the grocery store salad dressing aisle--disgusting.