Suggestions for what kind of cuisine Ukraine women prefer?

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Joined Jun 5, 2018
I host an Airbnb here in the States and a group of Ukraine women have booked to stay at my place for a few days. Since my rates already include breakfast (I like feeding my guests) I was wondering what type of cuisine ladies from Ukraine would prefer when visiting a foreign country. Would they appreciate the deep-fried food we normally eat or would they prefer some of our uncommon dishes like Gumbo (my brother’s fave) and some PB&J’s? (for afternoon snacks).


Opinions, suggestions, insults or wisecracks are welcomed!
 
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Joined Oct 1, 2006
Hi gman,

Welcome to CT!

General rule- don't cook food from the country of origin of your guests. I never cooked german food for germans or french food for french. Copy and search for Ukrainian food favorites. Avoid these...

If this is their first visit to U.S., I doubt any have ever had a Jalapeño. Go easy and offer the spicy stuff on the side. If you want to blow them away, show them how much hot sauce you put in your bowl of mild Gumbo to make it taste right! They would probably remember that for the rest of their lives! Good times...

Start with your normal local favorites. Since you mentioned gumbo, I assume you can groove to biscuits and gravy for breakfast! Once they are there, you can find out what they hope for! (If you can't contact them before arrival) I would expect they would like to try american favorites but they could give you a little help on this. A big juicy hamburger could blow them away! They may have never had Heinz catsup, French's mustard or American ground beef.

I appreciate that you care enough to ask for guidance, that shows me you care and it tells me they are going to love you!

P.S. I gave a jar, each of Crunchy Jiff and Welchs Grape jelly to a Belgian Chef. He finished them in two days! You never know...
 
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Joined May 30, 2015
Highlight what makes your local cuisine special. Ukrainian cuisine features a lot of soups, sausages/salamis and cold salads, slaws, pickles, etc. You could try to find analogues in your local cuisine to show your local flavors in a format they would appreciate.

As a side note, sushi is wildly popular in Eastern Europe, but I'd leave that to the sushi restaurants.
 
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Joined Aug 15, 2003
Cook what you would normally cook..when you travel to a foreign country you don't want to eat someone's bad take on the food you eat everyday where you live.

If I went to Spain and someone tried to feed me an Egg McMuffin for breakfast I'd be annoyed.
 
4
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Joined Jun 5, 2018
Hi gman,

Welcome to CT!

General rule- don't cook food from the country of origin of your guests. I never cooked german food for germans or french food for french. Copy and search for Ukrainian food favorites. Avoid these...

If this is their first visit to U.S., I doubt any have ever had a Jalapeño. Go easy and offer the spicy stuff on the side. If you want to blow them away, show them how much hot sauce you put in your bowl of mild Gumbo to make it taste right! They would probably remember that for the rest of their lives! Good times...

Start with your normal local favorites. Since you mentioned gumbo, I assume you can groove to biscuits and gravy for breakfast! Once they are there, you can find out what they hope for! (If you can't contact them before arrival) I would expect they would like to try american favorites but they could give you a little help on this. A big juicy hamburger could blow them away! They may have never had Heinz catsup, French's mustard or American ground beef.

I appreciate that you care enough to ask for guidance, that shows me you care and it tells me they are going to love you!

P.S. I gave a jar, each of Crunchy Jiff and Welchs Grape jelly to a Belgian Chef. He finished them in two days! You never know...
I like to give my guests the best experience that they are paying for. Biscuits and gravy as well as a big juicy hambuger sound like a good suggestion. Thanks!
 
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Joined Jun 5, 2018
Highlight what makes your local cuisine special. Ukrainian cuisine features a lot of soups, sausages/salamis and cold salads, slaws, pickles, etc. You could try to find analogues in your local cuisine to show your local flavors in a format they would appreciate.

As a side note, sushi is wildly popular in Eastern Europe, but I'd leave that to the sushi restaurants.
I guess I could prepare a good batch of pizza with sausage and salami. I was thinking about prepping texas bbq with a side of slaw too.
 
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Joined Jun 5, 2018
Cook what you would normally cook..when you travel to a foreign country you don't want to eat someone's bad take on the food you eat everyday where you live.

If I went to Spain and someone tried to feed me an Egg McMuffin for breakfast I'd be annoyed.
My usual breakfast is an option of pancakes and bacon, oats and fruits, toast and eggs, or waffle and chicken. I really love big breakfast meals.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
Do you need any help with this event? :)

I agree with the others. Travelers on vacation don't look for the same food (or poor imitations) they eat at home. I did not spend a week in Istanbul so I could find the best hamburger or mac-n-cheese.

You could literally offer the entire menu from Chili's and do very well.

One suggestion would be to plan your menu around the style of food your area of the country is known for i.e. cajun, Southern BBQ, Texas BBQ, cheeses (Wisconsin/ New York Cheddar), fruit (Georgia peaches, NY Apples, Florida organges etc), Vermont maple syrup, New England seafood and so on.

This is a great time of year and many fresh fruits, herbs and veggies are coming into season.

Ok....here's the wise crack. I literally had to do a double take at your profile name because at first glance, it looked like "genitalman." I'm not saying you should change your name, but, you should probably change your name. lol.

Good luck! :)
 
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Joined Apr 3, 2008
Europeans don't eat big breakfasts like we do here so I'd stay away from making too too much. One day do pancakes with sausage, and fruit compote. The next day make a frittata with toast and jams. The next day do biscuits and gravy, and so on and so forth. But you should always offer yogurts, juices, and hot/cold cereal.
 
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Joined Sep 5, 2008
My usual breakfast is an option of pancakes and bacon, oats and fruits, toast and eggs, or waffle and chicken.
I wouldn't change a thing. If I were traveling to another country to an Air BnB that offered breakfast I would expect that country's traditional fair, not what the host expect me to like based on my country of origin. In fact... where's your BnB? I could eat a waffle and chicken right now and we don't find those anywhere here in France. :)
 
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Europeans don't eat big breakfasts like we do here so I'd stay away from making too too much. One day do pancakes with sausage, and fruit compote. The next day make a frittata with toast and jams. The next day do biscuits and gravy, and so on and so forth. But you should always offer yogurts, juices, and hot/cold cereal.
I quite agree. When I stayed in British and German BnBs this was basically the style... which worked quite well. Local food, good local food, a bit of variation from day-to-day, and not much choice... it was a great experience. But how about cinnamon rolls... they'd probably love those. :)
 
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