Sugar/Chocolate in Art School?

Discussion in 'General Culinary School Discussions' started by kuan, Jan 20, 2002.

  1. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm watching the pastry world cup right now on FoodTV. To me, these guys are among best artists in the world, rivalling anything you see at any Art Museum in the world. So anyway, I think chocolate and sugar sugar work should be admitted into the mainstream art world like pastels and oils. Is there anyone out there who goes to art school who also works in these media?

    Kuan
     
  2. w.debord

    w.debord

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    I remember seeing a new clip about an 'arist' that was doing a 'piece of art' at a well known hotel (NY city I beleive) ...where his art was throwing spegetti noodles all over the room (honest to god).


    Well seriously....you could find some people open enough to consider this fine art and pay in that range. BUT most of the food sculptures are a bit too representational for most art critics and collectors.

    I watched that show too, Kuan. They really are brilliant! I love watching....just wish they'd take a deeper behind the scenes look and tell more how to (or just show us UP CLOSE IN EVERY BOOTH ALL DAY, so we can figure out the 'how' ourselves). I was very suprised by some info I learned. I really didn't realize you could have a famous company make your molds and use them for a competition... Lot's of cool little tricks...I can barely go to sleep after watching that stuff, don't you just wish you could be there and taste everything too?! IT'S SO INSPIRING!!!
     
  3. pastrychef_den

    pastrychef_den

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    Hi,

    I used to work for one of them. It was really amazing how they do stuff. I have seen them when the team was still practicing for the competition. Ewald Notter is really good with sugar, En-Ming is a good leader and very artistic and handles chocolate and sugar really well, Michel is good with pralines and chocolate as well...Amazing group of people...

    I'v tasted some of the sample cakes and they were truly very flavorful and super tasty.
     
  4. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Exactly! You can EAT this stuff if you want. I've watched Notter so many times doing workshops and stuff. He's amazing, what the heck, they're ALL amazing. I bet you these people would do great if you gave them some acrylics and gesso. Maybe the judges are not ready for Picasso, but I see things getting a little more abstract these days. Heh, and also I think the problem with spaghetti art is the taste, yeah, that's it!

    These guys are good!

    Kuan
     
  5. monpetitchoux

    monpetitchoux

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    Joseph Schmidt, mostly known as a chocolatier, also works in chocolate as a medium. I went to see some of his work in a small little gallery in San Francisco two years ago. You could smell the chocolate as you walk up the stairs. But his work is actually contemplative in a very cerebral kind of way and didn't do much for whetting my appetite at all. At the end, I concluded that his work was very intriguing. With chocolate, it was mostly sculpture, but a very far cry from the chocolate santa village in his shop window. If I remember correctly, there was a woman's leg stockinged in fishnet, a woman's torso (no head), some wings and lots of pulled cotton, I think. And there were some roses. What struck me the most was how colorful everything was. The way he mixed colors, you'd never suspect that he was workingin chocolate.
     
  6. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Their definately artists! With-out doubt I'm certain they all could work in most any media, food is actually much hard then all of media!

    They talk design, concept, etc... I liked the computor graphic of Notters sugar sulpture and Ming and him are talking design like two artists in a studio.

    Notter would have the easiest transition into glass, and be a master in no time at all.

    But there's only so much money in fine art and I tend to think that fine art isn't going to welcome in a new media and more competition for that buck. It's easier for them to ignore this art then to welcome it.