stuffed french toast vs Pain Perdu

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what is the big difference? is there any? is it more of a translation thing? lost in translation?

only thing i think i do differently is, the Pain Perdu is more "soaked" in egg mixture, where as french toast is dipped in it.

BTW- made a fantastic one this morning for the fam. Filling was cream cheese and orange marmalade, made a strawberry sauce and had fresh berries to go with it. dollup of whipped cream and a shake or two of powdered sugar... YUM!
 
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The two are one and the same. Pain Perdu refers to rescuing bread that is lost by dipping it in an egg mixture. (Perdu is translated as "lost".)

I prefer my bread soaked in the mixture, then cooked until just the right texture.

I would love to have a bite of your pain perdu!
 
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What do you mean by "stuffed" French Toast? What we call "pain perdu" (or amerite) in France is what is called French Toast in the US, except in France we don't put chantilly or cinnamon or anything but sugar on it - never heard of "stuffed" ones though.
 

phatch

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stuffed ones often have some cream cheese or similar item plus jam. Often baked because the bread is cut thick and it cooks more evenly with the generous filling.

A Monte Cristo could be considered a partially deconstructed savory version I suppose. At least I see the same concept in play.

Phil
 
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Thanks phatch. I've never heard of stuffed pain perdu in France, or baked pain perdu either for that matter. AFAIK pain perdu is really simple: slices of stale bread dipped in egg/milk, colored in butter then sprinkled with plain sugar.
 
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Stuffed french toast was made popular nationally in the USA by I.H.O.P . Theirs though is actually a triangular shaped filled donut made under license from Riches Foods Buffalo NY. You can buy the empty shell from riches but not the stuffed one as it is a propriatery item of IHOP. They can be filled with almost anything you can dream up/:chef:
 
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How does one make a triangular donut? Intriguing that. Commercially I guess with special equipment, maybe not do-able at home.

So, is a Croque Monsiuer or a Croque Madame the same process but the Monsiuer with ham and cheese, and the Madame the same but a fried/poached egg on top?

Just curious :)
 
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No, in a croque the bread is not dipped in anything. Also, it's not toasted with butter in a pan, but in a toaster oven. And on a croque madame you put a fried egg, not poached.

At least if you're looking for the "authentic" original. I like to spread a very thin layer of mornay on the upper side of the bottom bread slice and on both sides of the upper bread slice when I make croque monsieur. Not the authentic, but very good!
 
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Thank you French Fries....I've seen a lot of recipes for the Croques with all sorts of variations, and was never sure if it was meant to be egg soaked or not.
 
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In its simplest form, a croque monsieur is white bread, ham and cheese, toasted. You may want to spread butter on the bread, but that's about it.

Now as you're saying, from there you can go any direction you want obviously. The one I make with sauce mornay is the typical croque monsieur you'll find in a French bistro. I believe the reason for the mornay is to keep the toasted bread from becoming too dry. But it also makes the sandwich richer and transforms a very simple sandwich into something a bit fancier.

Personally I've never seen a variation with the bread soaked in something - but chances are someone has tried it before. Heck, didn't Elvis deep fry his PB&J sandwiches? :lol:
 
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All I know is that on the day before cooking the FT, I set the slices of bread I'm going to use on the countertop to stale. That way their extra dryness will allow for better absorption of the egg mixture.
 
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Saw a show once where Anthony Worall=Thompson from the UK made a dish he called Croque Monsieur - he has lead me down the garden path :)

The Pain Perdue is a versatile dish. I think some dip into the eggs then out, others leave in for up to 10 minutes. Personal taste probably, and how stale the bread is. Kokopuffs - good tip.

I have some stale sliced baguette pieces in the pantry, was going to use them for bread crumbs....hmmm... that could work as a side for the lasagne tonight...yep, got eggs. (Ignoring cholesterol over the holiday period :D ) Here we go!
 

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