strange problem

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by gbhunter, Jul 10, 2005.

  1. gbhunter

    gbhunter

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    Here is the issue. I was attempting to make garlic mashed potatoes. I peeled and cut the potatoes (they were fine nothing visibly wrong with them). I also peeled, cut and grated finely a few garlic cloves. In a pot I just barely covered the potatoes with water then added salt and the grated garlic. As the potatoes boiled I noticed that green foam formed on top! After the potatoes got soft I strained the water out and noticed the potatoes were covered in a very very light green slimy substance. Plus they did not smell like garlic! They smelled like sweaty socks. I have cooked potatoes in this pot, but I have never grated the garlic, I usually added the cloves whole and no salt. So could this be from the salt and the garlic. Or could this be caused by the fact the garlic was old? Or am I just doing this garlic mashed potatoes thing all wrong all together! :cry:
     
  2. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Don't know the reason for your problem, but when making my garlic mashed I do it one of 2 ways. #1. I puree roasted garlic and add it to the potatoes as I am whipping them. #2. I simmer garlic in the cream for about 25-30 minutes and blend before adding to my potatoes. They always turn out great these ways. I have never cooked my garlic with my potatoes. I think you would dilute the garlic flavor as you toss the water that the potatoes and garlic are cooked in.
     
  3. disturbo

    disturbo

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    Hi. I'm new to this forum, but wanted to say that sounded like a pretty strange way to make garlic mash. Pete's suggestions sound more along the lines of what I usually do... press a few cloves, add to some cream and heat, then add that to the potato after cooking them.

    Cheers!
     
  4. ricib

    ricib

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    No idea where boiling the garlic comes from, but I'd certainly never do that. I like the idea of simmering the garlic in the cream, though I've never done it that way. Usually just in some sweet cream butter, then add it as I'm whipping the pots.

    When I do make mashed pots I use only Yukon Golds, (unless I'm in a hurry and need to use instant), though I did make them once with Purple pots, and they were even better. If you can get past the blue/purple hue of whipped pots that way. I loved them, my guest wouldn't touch them at first though.

    I'd say the only thing you need in your water when boiling the pots is a bit of salt. Add everything later.
     
  5. gbhunter

    gbhunter

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    I put chopped garlic in olive oil, heated the mixture up..and the garlic turned green and it started smelling like garlic/diswash detergent. could this be do to old garlic? :confused:
     
  6. mudbug

    mudbug

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    Exactly what if your pot made out of? Brass, copper, iron or zinc cookware or utensils can cause discoloration. They can react with acid or salt solutions.

    It is also possibly due to hard water. "To soften hard water, boil it for 15 minutes, and let it stand covered for 24 hours. Skim off surface scum, if necessary. Carefully pour or ladle water from the container without disturbing the sediment on the bottom." http://www.homefamily.net

    Use garlic cloves that are hard, not soft.

    Try this recipe for "Shallot Mashed Potatoes with Garlic" from food scientist Shirley Corriher who is often a guest on Good Eats with Alton Brown on the Food Network:

    http://www.melissas.com/recipes/inde...Recipe_ID=1731

    Let us know how it turns out for you... ;)
     
  7. fat al

    fat al

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    While you are mashing your spuds add the crushed fresh garlic cloves (after taking the green bit (germ) out as it tastes bitter) and subsitute cream for a good slug of extra virgin olive oil - tastes good and is marginally more healthy, possibly.
     
  8. markv

    markv

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    I'm with Pete's #2 method: simmering the garlic in the cream, although his first choice sounds very yummy as well.

    Mark
     
  9. gbhunter

    gbhunter

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    The second time this happened the garlic was heated in olive oil.. I used a regular stainless all clad sauce pan. I heated the oil with the garlic in it and it again turned green and smelled rancid. I did not even get a chance to use the oil with the garlic in it since the garlic turned the oil rancid.
     
  10. headless chicken

    headless chicken

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    Try roasting a whole head of garlic with the top removed, lightly oiled to prevent burning, and seasoned in 375F. The end result should be the same consistancy as an over rippened banana, soft and mashable.