Straining Rissoto Rice

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by celerystik, Jan 3, 2014.

  1. celerystik

    celerystik

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    Hey guys, I'm just curious if any of you have ever tried straining all the moisture out of your rissoto rice to either gain a certain effect or purely to experiment. How did it turn out? Or is this a ridiculous question to ask aha?

    Celery
     
  2. soesje

    soesje

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    the short answer is, you don't strain risotto.

    the whole point of risotto is the way it's prepared, to achieve the right consistency.

    if you would strain a risotto it just would not be right.

    unless you mean you made a mistake and your risotto has too much liquid?

    then I would just plain start over… 
     
  3. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I've never experimented doing that.  I don't think there's enough liquid to strain.  Although you can allow the risotto to cool completely and then do a quick fried rice with it I guess, for the sake of experimenting.
     
  4. celerystik

    celerystik

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    yea exactly it was more for experimental purposes that i wanted to know but hey, worht a shot
     
  5. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I am not trying to be a know-it-all or wise guy, but do you know that risotto is a dish and not a particular type of rice? Carnaroli is a type of rice used to risotto but it also makes an excellent paella, as well as numerous other dishes. It doesn't have to be restricted to only risotto. Wouldn't straining a risotto be similiar to making a clam chowder and straining it. I am sure it would be fine, but to what purpose?
     
  6. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    Well considering straining it would remove the liquid, that would achieve risottos perfect consistency , the answer is "no" you dont strain rice when making risotto. 

    If something was to go wrong i rather just do it over, then strain the rice. 

    Now if its just for the purpose of experimenting and you arent actually going to make risotto with the rice, then why not , experiment around until your hearts content. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif  
     
  7. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Well it occurs to me that if you strain the risotto you're straining half the flavor right out.

    Like pouring the gravy off  your....gravy.
     
  8. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    In Asia, starchy short grain rices are cooked for sticky rice, think rice  for sushi. Usually, the surface starch is rinsed away first, which is sort of the opposite approach to making risotto where you stir to agitate the surface starch into the cooking liquid. 

    These short grained rices are also steamed to serve with dinner and leftovers are often fried. One of my favorite local Chinese restaurants does their fried rice with a short grain rice.  Another thing they'll do with these types of rice is to steam them into a "cake" or "pudding", often with dried fruits or sweet red bean paste as a filling. 

    There's plenty of things to do with rice beyond what we often think of, and these things are usually traditional to one cuisine or another already.