Storing Pasta

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by Lucusd88, Mar 10, 2019.

  1. Lucusd88

    Lucusd88

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    Hi Chefs,

    Just looking for opinions on the best way to store fresh pasta. At the moment I’m rolling and cutting, forming into nests before service and then freezing down after service. I’ve tried defrosting the nests, but they seem to clump together. I’ve tried blanching from frozen but the pasta seems to become tough.

    I’ve heard some chefs say they best way is to blanch, then refresh then dress with a little oil. What is the shelf life when doing this?

    Thanks in advance,
    Luke
     
  2. chefross

    chefross

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    Well, the last thing you want to do is oil the pasta because any sauce you mix with it will just fall off and not stick.
    If you have fresh pasta on your menu, you don't want to freeze them at all. The best thing to do is add making pasta to the prep list and keep a par stock as fresh as possible
     
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  3. Transglutaminase

    Transglutaminase

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    Just watched an episode of "Bonacini's Italy".
    With leftover homemade/fresh uncooked pasta (fettucini/whatever), he had suggested making nests & storing in bags in the refrigerator 4-5 days max.
    I've tried both drying & freezing (esp. egg pasta).. usually doesn't recover well. :-(
    G' Luck! :)
     
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  4. Lucusd88

    Lucusd88

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    Ideally I would make it fresh everyday but it’s not always achievable unfortunately. I’ll see if I can get a couple of days out of it before it oxidises. It also seems a waste to be throwing it at the end of service when not sold!
     
  5. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    One option is to limit your fresh pasta making to raviolis, pappardelle, gnocchi and the like and use good quality dried for others like spaghetti and linguine. Many high end places do that because of the difficulties you are experiencing. You can make fresh pasta to run as unique menu items and specials and so limit production to what you can sell out of. This limits your production needs and frees up labor for other things.
     
  6. drewjsph02

    drewjsph02

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    Executive chef of a 300 seat Italian restaurant here. We make our own spaghetti, fettuccine, linguine, capellini, rigatoni, etc. in house. We never freeze our pasta with the exception of Rigatoni and Macaroni. Now our pasta is extruded as opposed to rolled, but, we dust all of the pasta lightly with semolina as it comes out, form it into 4oz nests, and then place these nests on parchment lined sheet trays. These trays are then covered with bun pan bags and stored on speed racks. We store the pasta to be used for service at room temperature and then toss what we don't use after service, which is never much as we are pretty good at anticipating our needs. This method has never given us an issue. We take the pasta and then place it directly in our pasta boiler, the only key is that the pasta needs to be agitated IMMEDIATELY, if you wait 20-30 seconds before you agitate then the pasta becomes clumped, you do have to stir it a couple of times depending on what type of pasta you are cooking and the time needed... but most fresh pasta only needs between 30 seconds to 4 ish minutes. Hope this helps. Feel free to PM me if you have any other questions. :)
     
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  7. chefross

    chefross

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    You would be the exception as you primary menu item is pasta. For a restaurant where pasta is simply another item on the menu, your process could be scaled down to simply the "nests" being set aside somewhere on the prep area at room temperature.
     
  8. drewjsph02

    drewjsph02

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    Not sure I COMPLETELY agree but I do get your point.
    However, because we are a large restaurant and we have to make our pasta in advance, our pasta sits in the cooler for much longer than would be necessary for a smaller place where the pasta could be made that day. Some of our lesser selling pasta goes 5-6 days before use and we still do not have issues with clumping.