Storing/holding fresh ravioli.

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chefatrh, Sep 11, 2011.

  1. chefatrh

    chefatrh

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    Have small Bistro style restaurant at which we have a home made pasta of the week.  This week we did shrimp and ricotta ravioli.  It was delicious the night we made it, but the edges were tough the next night.  We make the dough ourselves (egg and flour), stuffed with cooked, pulsed shrimp, ricotta, egg, and spice mixture.  We held them in a single layer on a hotel pan on a floured pan liner and cooked them to order in salted water.

    Any suggestions on holding or par cooking…..

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. gunnar

    gunnar

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    either freeze them, then wrap them and defrost and cook as needed or you might try a hotel pan with a moist paper towel or two and covered with another moist towel or two then held in a fridge covered. Either should keep them from drying out. 
     
  3. someday

    someday

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    Every place I've ever worked we froze the pasta in single layers on sheet pans with fine cornmeal, or maybe flour. 

    Once they are frozen you can store in covered hotel pans, or wrapped, or whatever...that might help. 

    Was your pasta dough sufficiently moist or was it a little dry? 
     
  4. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I agree, freeze them in a single layer when you make them.  Once frozen they can be put into bags (we used to bag them up in portions).  Unless they are really large, no need to defrost them before cooking, just toss right into the boiling water.
     
  5. guts

    guts

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    Where I work, I make the ravioli every day first thing when I get in so I'll always have fresh ones for service, when they're a day or two old I just toss 'em as they get pretty tough, less fresh, and take a hell of a a lot longer to cook when an order gets picked up.

    We store them in a hotel pan in single layers with semolina.
     
    Last edited: Sep 30, 2011