Stones, knife, board, things...

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by pinkfreud65, Sep 25, 2016.

  1. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    Alright,I'm looking quite seriously at grabbing a Fujiwara FKH gyuto. I'm wondering what all I really need to keep up with this knife? I'm pretty new to quality knives but I have been doing research for the last few months on what knife to get, and I think for under $100 the FKH is about the best I will find, unless anyone has any other options?

    so, now for other questions...

    Stones and how to use them/recommendations for what to get.

    What type of cutting board to get and any recommendations?

    anything else? I'm open to all tips, tricks, help, advice, etc!

    Thanks, PF.
     
  2. benuser

    benuser

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    Good knife, great F&F at this price point. A few things you should be aware of, though.
    It is highly reactive, so you really need to force a patina. No big deal, hot vinegar, coffee, lemon, mustard, all will do.
    It is strongly right-biased. The edge is off-centered to the left. The right bevel is large, the left one very small. Definitely not for left-handers.
    As with most factory knives, the edge out-of-the-box is rather weak, and somewhat unpredictable. The end-user is expected to put his own one on it. Just following the factory edge is no good idea in this case. No big problem, we will explain how to do.
     
  3. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    Alright, glad to hear that! :) So, how does one go about sharpening this knife? what will I need?
     
  4. benuser

    benuser

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    A 800-1200 and a 3000-4000, both JIS -- Japanese grit system.
     
  5. foody518

    foody518

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    What cutting board are you using currently?

    Just to make sure you're aware - the FKH is monosteel carbon and the FKM is monosteel stainless. Just in case you weren't meaning to get yourself into the carbon life ;)

    Some flattening solution as you go along. It could be coarse sandpaper or drywall screen on a flat surface, a stone fixer, or a diamond plate. Price increases with speed, longevity, and convenience

    You can go something like Bester 1200 to Suehiro Rika 5000, or Cerax 1000 to Rika 5000, or if those are slightly above budget, King stones will work fine
     
  6. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    yes, I'm aware of the FKH. I think carbon would better serve me in the sharpening aspect. I am quite anal when it comes to caring for my things.

    I currently have a standard plastic board, and use basic knives I got as a wedding gift. Assuming I get a quality kife, I'm looking at getting an end-grain butchers block.

    Ok all this talk of stones is WAY over my head at the moment. someone will need to literally spell it out for me. I'm not looking to spend $100 on stones if I can help it. If there are any kits I could purchase that would be great.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
  7. foody518

    foody518

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    higher priced than this will get your more friendly stone dimensions, faster cutting, wearing less quickly, etc. But the FKH you're looking at is a fairly simply carbon steel and will do fine with a King type stone.

    Do you have a budget for board and stones then?
     
  8. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    those look good and they aren't an arm and a leg! lol. I am looking st this for my board, https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00O...ting+board&dpPl=1&dpID=41GeAKRCOUL&ref=plSrch
     
  9. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    that looks like a good set of stones. thanks! I am looking at a Michigan Maple End Grain block for $50. I'd like to keep the price as low as possible but, I'll spend what I need to, to keep my things working correctly.
     
  10. foody518

    foody518

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    http://www.ebay.com/sch/m.html?_nkw=&_armrs=1&_ipg=&_from=&_ssn=227wood&_sop=15 There's also this option for boards, comes with feet. I just got a walnut board from him the other week, 22x18x1.875 inches, comes nicely sanded and oiled. It took a very few coats of oil to get it prep-ready compared to the MMB. The rectangular vs square shape is personal preference; I prefer the rectangular shape.

    One of the auctions for a 12x15 board from this guy went last week for another $40-50 if I recall correctly. 



    Before (as it came) and then during an oiling
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
  11. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    nice! I'll check him out thanks! the board looks beautiful btw!
    now for sharpening...I'm kinda new to it...how does one do it correctly?
     
  12. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    woah! thanks for the info! I'll check him out! the board looks beautiful btw!

    So, for sharpening...how do I do it? lol
     
  13. foody518

    foody518

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  14. benuser

    benuser

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    But before sharpening it, you'll have to create a patina. The acid stuff will dull the edge a bit, and once a patina got installed sharpening becomes much easier, as you can actually see where steel got abraded.
     
  15. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    I planned on forcing a patina.
     
  16. benuser

    benuser

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    As for sharpening, knowing these knives a bit, I would aim for a convexed bevel on the right side, ending at some 12 degree, and a very small straight bevel of some 20 degree on the left one, to compensate a bit for steering.
    They come from the factory with a much finer edge, so very little work has to be done to change it. These are really mini- and micro-bevels.
    But first see Mr Broida's videos so you get an idea of what sharpening is about.
     
    foody518 likes this.
  17. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    you will need to break that down for me man. that's another language lol.
     
    Last edited: Sep 26, 2016
  18. foodieforlife36

    foodieforlife36

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    Generally i get a lot of things from amazon, the reviews are trustworthy and if you happen to have amazon prime you get free 2 day shipping /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif   The cooking supplies they have are literally endless ( i probably spend way to much time on there /img/vbsmilies/smilies/blushing.gif) but this is the knife I'm currently using - http://amzn.to/2dsykjC  its awesome for the price and cuts like a champ 

    When it comes to cutting boards i always invest in a quality one because of how sharp the knives I'm using are, they have some cheaper versions you can check out but i'd recommend this one - http://amzn.to/2cxgoaz  if you're looking for high quality and long lasting /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
     
  19. pinkfreud65

    pinkfreud65

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    great thread for sharpening! Thanks!