stock or broth

39
10
Joined Jan 9, 2002
Is there difference between stock and broth? I seem to recall somewhere that broth is the natural and obvious liquid result from cooking vegetables and/or meat. (this one staying liquid when cooled)

Stock being the purpouseful liquid from cooking bones, and herbs and vegetables to make a flavorful liquid. ( this one becoming gelatinous when cooled because of the bones)

Am I splitting stems?, or are these pretty much the same?
 
274
10
Joined Oct 27, 2001
Cinabun,
it may have more to do with geographical location and semantics than culinary questions. For me broth is thick 'stock to your ribs' soup made with red lentils or barley. Traditionally it's made with ham haugh, (smoked ham ribs) but you can use it with another vegetable or meat base. For me stock is pure liquid made from vegetables or meat or fish which is used as a base for soup or as an addition to a dish. But I've seen broth in American recipes when i would call it stock. BTW, the Spanish have one word 'caldo' which encompases it all
 
2,068
12
Joined Dec 30, 1999
broth
A liquid resulting from cooking vegetables, meat or fish in water. The term is sometimes used synonymously with bouillon .

stock
In the most basic terms, stock is the strained liquid that is the result of cooking vegetables, meat or fish and other seasoning ingredients in water. A brown stock is made by browning bones, vegetables and other ingredients before they're cooked in the liquid. Most soups begin with a stock of some kind, and many sauces are based on reduced stocks.

From Epicurious.com

;)
 
274
10
Joined Oct 27, 2001
very confusing. Bouillon is French for caldo, which for me is stock!! Oh the joys of culinary terms!!! :confused:
 
39
10
Joined Jan 9, 2002
So, what I am reading is that there isn't a lot of difference between the two, just terminology?

I just was sure I had heard somewhere that one major difference was the jelling of the liquid when cooled.

I know some of my stock/broth jells and some does not and seems directly related to the percentage and presence of the bones.

OH well both serve the same purpose it was just one of those curiosity questions. :lips:
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
I know that culinary language can be confusing cinabun.

If I may interject.
There are differnces between stocks and broths, With out going to far into details, The stock you refer to jells because of the marrow in the bones is being extracted by the procces of reduction,As the calogen and marrow cool you will see your stock firm up. You know before we ever had a can of "Knox" for aspices the chefs used the chilled stocks to achive there Chou foiu (sorry about the spelling) pieces.
 
39
10
Joined Jan 9, 2002
WOW! Thanks. That confirms what I thought I had heard, and answers any remaining doubts or confusion----
~bun:cool:
 
39
10
Joined Jan 9, 2002
UHH--I do have another question.

What seperates Stock and broth from A demiglas( I truly don't know how to spell that)

I looked in the regular dictionary, but no help. I think that is the right term???
 
4,508
32
Joined Jul 31, 2000
Is the process of reducing your stock by half to concentrate everything, If you reduce your demi by half you get what is called a Glace de viade
cc
 

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