Stencils for Plate Decorating

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by saffron, Mar 20, 2006.

  1. saffron

    saffron

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    What is the best source for stencils or templates for upscale plate decorating.
    I have used lazer cut paper cutouts from scrapbooking places. Limited use from plastic or metal stencils. Looking for very compex designs, large variety for multiple event purposes. I am known for trio desserts on dinner plates so I love to create upscale presentations and garnishes. Many thanks

    Michele
     
  2. moreink

    moreink

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    Here is a link for stencils. Have you checked them out? www.designerstencils.com. Under "products" they have "Cake and Confectionery" stencils.
     
  3. panini

    panini

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    Hi Michele.
    Are you looking to spray or drop on the stensil?
    I'm curious. I have been searching for some intricate stensils and have not had any luck.
    I've been working with someone who has a sign shop and has cut some acitate that works fine on cakes, because I can chill the templates and they won't stick to the cake. I've only sprayed with them. College logos and things of that nature. I played around with the idea for static stensils for plates, but I don't do a lot of plating. I am going to return to that idea to maybe resell these to the industry. I probably shouldn't be telling you:talk: someone will probably take the idea and run. We had actually done some small personal ones, like crests. Man, they were nice. The application was a snap and since I sprayed choco, it gave a good period of time before they hardened and the cut wasn't clean. and, you can rewash them.
    pan
     
  4. saffron

    saffron

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    Yes, I know about this site. Just thought I could find more stylish stencils like Fleur de Lis or Japanese symbols or art deco designs. I know these exist for wall stencils in plastic (too large) and paper stencils (either too amateurish or too disposable a medium for repetitive work). Many thanks. Saffron
     
  5. tuile time

    tuile time

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    Check out tuiletime.com
     
  6. chefraz

    chefraz

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  7. shape shifter

    shape shifter

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  8. rat

    rat

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    Use an old plastic sheet and an exacto knife, instant stencil......
    Plastic fish boxes are ideal.
     
  9. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    If you can find a copy of one of Chef Bo Fribergs books the Professional Pastry Chef he has some good templates in the books for plate decoration...
     
  10. kbrewer

    kbrewer

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    try culinarystencils.com, they where in vegas this week and gave some really nice demos!
     
  11. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    I wanted to make custom stencils, so what I did, was buy a stencil cutter (it's around $30). All it is is a very very hot metal tip. You then buy stencil film, trace your design on the film, then use the stencil cutter to cut out the designs. It's just like tracing. And you have a custom stencil you can use over and over again. I like making my own stuff..:roll:
     
  12. momoreg

    momoreg

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    I just made a bunch with that tool, and I found that the edges weren't as smooth as the factory-made stencils. Do you agree? Also, the process was soooooo slow, because the heat didn't melt the mylar as quickly as I'd hoped.
     
  13. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    Yes, I agree, the edges aren't quite as smooth, but that hasn't affected the way the stencil works. It still seems quite usable. I thought the tip melted the stencil film quite well and I could keep up a fairly steady pace. It is a slow process though, especially if you are cutting out intricate designs. I figure for the money I'm saving buying the commercially made stencils it's worth a little time.
     
  14. nowiamone

    nowiamone

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    I've been watching this thread since it started. And thought I would share a little tidbit with you.

    For many years, in life "before restaurant," I traveled with a board five times a year in the Pacific Northwest. For a few years as we would gather for dinner and in certain restaurants everyone stopped ordering the desserts. Only because the elaborate presentations were known for being plated with chocolate powder or white powdered sugar sprinkled over a stencil.

    It was a mess to eat, we would end up with traces of the powder on our suit fabric no matter how hard we tried to avoid it. And when you are traveling hard with a multiple city agenda, you really try to get 2-3 days out of every suit jacket.
     
  15. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Good point. We also use them for icing, to accent cakes.
     
  16. nowiamone

    nowiamone

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    Not to take your thread off subject, but during the same time period my husband and I had our 7 year old grandson, who was quite the budding gourmet, with us in Seattle. We had dinner at one of the hotel restaurants that had used the first initial of their name as a logo.

    The grandson ordered a dessert, which came on a huge, charger sized dinner plate, which had sprinkled cocoa powder over the stenciled ornate "M" on the plate. Meaning the "M" was the clean area.

    The plate was attacked with only the gusto that a seven year old boy can have for a chocolate dessert; which meant that the cocoa powder was on his face in his eyebrows, cheeks, elbows, end of his nose; you could almost see the cloud of chocolate dust rising above the white linens and sparkling silver. We could see every diner looking at him in amusement; even the waiters were taking peaks at him from behind the foliage.

    As we walked out of the dining room, he was asked a dozen times by other diners, "How was your dessert?"

    And with a straight serious chocolate covered face, he's tell them, "Pretty good."