Starting a Restaurant and need advice on sauces.

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by vanity02, Aug 15, 2014.

  1. vanity02

    vanity02

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    Hey guys,
    I'm a restaurant in Taiwan and need some help with sauce prep and storage . My background is a teppanyaki and Japanese cuisine cook for over 10 years. My experience as far as French cooking only extends to my own personal entertainment and enjoyment at home. I do know how to make your basic 5 etc...
    As for my question, since I've never worked a line before, how to restaurants store and make sauces? Are they made daily and kept in a Bain marie? Or are they made in weekly batches and kept in the cooler and warmed before service? Or hopefully not made per order on the spot.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2014
  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    All sauces for items on the saute station are generally made at the moment.  The demi, or glace, is kept on the cold side of the line and the sauces built up.

    For grilled you can hold the sauces in a bain marie or if it's slow heat up a little at a time.

    I prefer Hollandaise to be made in small batches.

    But it depends on your restaurant of course.
     
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  3. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Like Kuan said, it all depends on the sauce and it's applications.  I find that most restaurants use a few of each; some made each day (i.e. Hollandaise & beurre blanc), some made a la minute (i.e. pan sauces) and some made in larger batches and heated up before service (i.e. many demi based sauces and some cream based sauces).
     
  4. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Depends n your volume  Store in stainless  steel, covered and dated.
     
  5. vanity02

    vanity02

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    Thanks for the response guys, I can kind of visualize it better now. It does make a ton of sense now that I think about it. In Japanese restaurants, most of our sauces are blended or mayo based and they hold pretty well for a week. So I'm assuming if I wanted to do French sauces on a teppan I should veer towards demi glace or hollandaise sauces. We are planning to open a 30 seat place up with only 1 cook "me" and a prep cook, so making sauces on the spot is out of the question. If I wanted to make sauces that I can store in a bain marie anything I should know? If I need to make it daily its fine, as long as the prep time is not too tedious since I will be doing pretty much all the prep. :D
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Hollandaise and Bernaise  Daily  all others figure at least 5 day shelf life at 39 degrees.  Some can be frozen as also the stocks
     
  7. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Yeah and I think you can reheat in a small pan placed directly on the teppan.
     
  8. harrisonh

    harrisonh

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    daily

    but depending on your labor situation, and other economies of scale, you might stretch it to two days if stored below 39F. More than 2 days might be legal, but that doesn't make it good/