Stabilized whipped cream for roll cake

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I'm going to be making a rolled genoise, which I'd like to fill with what amounts to sweetened whipped cream studded with strawberries. This is very popular in Japan, where my son (the birthday boy) got hooked on it.

My problem is that the cake is going to have to sit for several hours, perhaps overnight in the fridge. So the cream has to be stabilized somehow.

Maida Heatter adds warm dissolved gelatine solution to semi-beaten cream sweetened with jam. I have seen several other variations on this theme. I've also seen ultra-stable formulations using carrageenan and such, which works so well with dairy, where you make it into a block and shear it into a light fluid gel.

Anyone here actually done this sort of thing and have a definite recommendation?
 
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I personally don't add anything to my whipped cream before rolling it in the Genoise. If properly whipped, the cream will be stable, even for over night.

My issue here would be with the strawberries which may bleed and screw things up for you.

Even if you add gelatin to the cream, the berries will still weep.

Solution would be to slice the berries very thin to keep the weeping to a minimum. Use the gelatin. 
 
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Unless making and serving immediately I use stabilized whipped cream. Would rather have fruit color bleeding than melting whipped cream.
 
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Gelatin and I don't always get along when stabilizing whipped cream.
About half the time I end up with those nasty little rubber balls lol.
Most of the time I add in 10x powdered sugar and it works great.
Surprisingly it is not too sweet.
You will need to sift it first as any lumps will stay that way.
I also like to start off with cold tools so I park the bowl and beaters in the freezer for a couple of hours.

mimi
 
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A lot depends on the fat content of the cream. 32% will deflate much quicker than 36%. Many old school cooks believe in slow whipping the cream, the slower, the more stable the whipped cream. It does seem to work.

I dissolve my gelatin in a bit of syrup, and add this to half whipped cream in a thin stream, with the whip going as slow as possible , then boot it into high until stiff.
 
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I add some milk powder and more icing sugar to stabilize my cream. Sometimes especially when it's too warm, I add some gelatine powder.
 
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I use gelatine . I've know some to use Clear gel or Xanthum gum. I get clear gel but I wonder what a test recipe would be like using the XG ?
 
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Any other suggestions on stabilizing whipped cream? I also have had bad luck with gelatin. Little rubber pieces. Where would you buy stabilized whipped cream? Does anyone have experience with the clear gel?

Thanks in advance!
 
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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned carrageenan, which gels in contact with calcium and is supposed to be especially good with dairy products. But since I haven't shelled out for the huge Modernist book, I don't know exactly how to use it.
 
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Thanks! Maybe someone will see your post and chime in with experience using carrageenan. That sounds interesting.
 
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Justin Logsdon of Amazing Food Made Easy says, boiling it down to essentials:

To thicken a dairy liquid, add .02-.04% weight Iota Carrageenan to the cool liquid. If the liquid is to be quite sweet, add the sugar later, as carrageenan doesn't play well with sugar. Disperse the carrageenan with a blender or mixer if at all possible. Heat liquid above 70C/158F to hydrate. Cool and it will thicken.

Note that if you didn't whip it very thoroughly you may need to strain it.
 
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Piping gel is fine and leaves no weird aftertaste, but you probably don't need to go to the expense. For me, corn syrup (about a teaspoon per cup of cream) is just as effective and doesn't change the taste or the texture noticeably. For a lot of people the whipped cream stays stable with just confectioners sugar, but I don't have the confidence that it will work every time, and feel the need to add something. I know its paranoid :) I've not had good luck with the gelatin method -- haven't been able to hit that perfect note of still liquid and pourable but not yet set and always wind up with little gelatin balls. Good luck!!
 
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I use gelatin and have always had great success. I dissolve it, heat it with a tiny bit of cream, and then kind of dribble it on the mixing whipped cream like you would a syrup. It should be cooled a bit.

My favorite stabilizer is called Kappa, which I believe is carageenan like some others are mentioning. I heat it with sugar and cream to 80C, then it must chilled for a good while to absorb and thicken. After that, it whips into a lovely, buttery stable cream. I add mascarpone for a quick tiramisu filling.
 
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A lot depends on the fat content of the cream. 32% will deflate much quicker than 36%. Many old school cooks believe in slow whipping the cream, the slower, the more stable the whipped cream. It does seem to work.

I dissolve my gelatin in a bit of syrup, and add this to half whipped cream in a thin stream, with the whip going as slow as possible , then boot it into high until stiff.
What sort of syrup do you dissolve your gelatin in? Do you have to heat the syrup for the gelatin to dissolve?
 
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Just simple syrup, as little as possible, and yes it must be heated to dissolve the gelatin, then allowed to cool to around body temp. before adding in a thin stream with the mixer running on slow,
You have the iption of adding vanilla/flavourings/booze to the syrup at this point.

However....
Try these two tricks first:
Shove your mixing bowl and whip into the freezer before starting.

Whip as slowly as possible, 7-10 mins if possible. This makes for a much more stable foam--it wont collapse as quickly as a cream that was whipped in half or a quarter of the time
 

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