St. Patrick's Day Recipe -- Irish Corned Beef with Vegetable

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by chefguy, Mar 18, 2010.

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  1. chefguy

    chefguy

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    St. Patrick's Day was yesterday, I Cooked the traditional St. Patrick's Day Recipe -- Irish Corned Beef with Vegetable.
    It came out so delicious, the beef is soft and tender.This Irish Corned Beef is with a few vegetables, including onion, carrots, celery, potatoes and cabbage. so many variety.

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    [​IMG]

    recipe video: http://www.bethecook.com/recipes/Irish-Corned-Beef-with-Vegetables

    Ingredients



    * 4-5 pound corned beef
    * spice packet
    * 3 quarts water
    * 1 onion - quartered
    * 3 carrots - cut in large chunks
    * 3 ribs celery - cut in 2-inch pieces
    * 1 tsp salt
    * 2 pounds red potatoes
    * 1 small green cabbage - cut in 8ths
    * hot mustard and rye bread


    Instructions
    Step 1
    Cut 3 carrots into large chunks.
    Cut 3 ribs celery into 2-inch pieces.


    Step 2
    Place 4-5 pound corned beef in a pot, and then add in spice packet,
    3 quarts water,
    1 quartered onion,
    carrots chunks,
    celery pieces,
    1 tsp salt, bring to a simmer.
    Heat the pot.
    Get rid of the foam on the top.


    Step 3
    Cover the pot, turn the heat very low,
    simmer for 3 hours.


    Step 4
    Then add in 2 pounds red potatoes, simmer potato for 30 minutes.
    While simmering, cut the cabbage into 8ths. put them into the pot.
    Cook covered til tender or for 20-30 minutes.


    Step 5
    Now pull out the meat, let it rest for 15 minutes. Cut the meat against grain into strips.

    Step 6
    Place the meat strips into a plate, then add some vegetables from the pot to the plate.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Looks familiar.  Didn't you just post these pictures along with a link to the same recipe in another thread?

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
  3. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Looks very good.  I seem to recall seeing certain spices added to this as well, could have been clove - am I right?
     
  4. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Clove is good but it's not something you often see in the usual mix of "pickling spice" that one associates with corned beef.  It's more of an individual touch (and probably a good one) than common.

    Clove may have been in one of the several recipes in the Irish Cooking thread where chefguy originally posted these pictures and the link to this recipe a few days ago; but I don't remember it offhand. 

    Anyway...  The trick to creating a flavor profile around corned beef is dealing with its saltiness -- you either need to accept it for what it is and balance it against vegetables which normally get a lot of salt in during cooking or at plating -- as here; or, balance it against something sufficiently intense to punch through the salt.  Clove is pungent enough to make a dent.  It certainly works well with other intensely salty meats -- like ham, for instance.

    However, since saltiness is largely experienced by the taste buds, in my opinion it's useful to balance it with other tastes that are on the taste buds as well.  That's why you often see beer added to the cooking broth.  It's serendipity that with all its Irish associations, Guinness, because of its intense bitter-sweetness, works so well. 

    This particular recipe doesn't do much along those lines to distinguish itself.  There are much, much better.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2010
  5. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I certainly do remember seeing other recipes and i recalling seeing large darkish spices added.  Maybe clove, maybe corriander.  Clove is a nice idea.
     
  6. chefguy

    chefguy

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    no, I only post this thread for the St. Patrick's Day. This is the only thread.

     
  7. chefguy

    chefguy

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    well expleaination. Boar_d_laze.
    please show us a much better recipe.

     
  8. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    chefguy, you're mistaken.  The pictures you posted in this thread, and the link to the same corned beef and vegetables recipe posted here were in post # 10 of the "Irish Food?" thread.

    Furthermore, besides bethecook, the recipe and video are posted on recipezaar and notimetocookdinner.com, and probably a bunch of other sites as well.     

    Since you asked for an example I'll happily furnish my own recipe as but one.  What makes mine "much better" than yours "along those lines" I was talking about -- balancing the salt -- are the sweet (molasses), sour (beer), and "umami" (stock) components.   

    BDL
     
  9. nicko

    nicko Founder of Cheftalk.com Staff Member

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     Lets know make this a bicker match. It appears it is posted in two threads. Closing this one.
     
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