Springerle Cookies

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by Seoul Food, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    Okay first off I am not a baker so any bakers out there that can help me with this would be appreciated. I want to make some traditional springerle cookies this holiday season but the recipe calls for baker's ammonia (Hartshorn) which is proving difficult to find around here. I read you can replace it with baking powder/baking soda in some form of mixture but sources have conflicting information on the ratios. So if anyone has used any of this stuff or knows if I can in fact substitute these out for bakers ammonia and if so in what ratio? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. chefpeon

    chefpeon Kitchen Dork

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    All that springerle cookies are, are a rolled out sugar cookie flavored with anise. Most traditional springerle recipes don't call for baker's ammonia, and it's rarely used anymore for anything. I just did a quick internet search for other springerle recipes besides my own, and every single one of them uses baking powder. Use one of those recipes instead of trying to find baker's ammonia.

    If you want to convert the recipe you already have, the conversion is easy: use the same amount of baking powder as you would baker's ammonia.
     
  3. Haylzt

    Haylzt

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    Hiya, I haven’t used it myself but am about to make a very similar recipe, also springerle with bakers ammonia. From what I’ve read it makes the cookies extra crisp and is still used a lot in German and Scandi baking. I grabbed some from a Scandi shop in a London but it’s easy to get on amazon too.
     
  4. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    I just made a batch last night. I cooked off a small amount that I wasn't worried about drying for the design and I will have to play around with the cooking time a little. I have never had the cookies before so I'm not really sure what they are supposed to be like. The flavor was good but the texture was a little weird and they stayed pretty flat which has me wondering what the baking powder is for.
     
  5. Haylzt

    Haylzt

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    The recipe I have says that the eggs should be whisked with the sugar for about 15 minutes, the cookies dried for 24 hours and then when you bake them they grow feet kind of like a macaron, it’s a really old Alsatian recipe. Does it sound similar to yours? I’m going to make them today and bake tomorrow and if they go well I can share.
     
  6. Haylzt

    Haylzt

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    Oh and they’re supposed to age for three weeks to develop flavour and texture, maybe that’s why the texture of yours seemed weird?
     
  7. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    Yeah even after sitting one day they seemed a little better. I believe they were over cooked on my trial batch. I had to do a little research as to what the texture was supposed to be because I had nothing to compare them too.