Southern Eggs Benedict

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by planethoff, Jul 16, 2018.

  1. planethoff

    planethoff

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    My wife went out with her boss to a semi upscale restaurant for brunch. She ordered “Southern Eggs Benedict” without really reading the description. It’s benedict, it’s gotta be good, right? Not exactly.

    When it came out, it was buttermilk biscuit with sausage gravy and poached egg.

    Two questions:
    Would any of you consider this in the “benedict” family?

    Would you ever pair poached egg with sausage gravy?
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2018
  2. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    No and maybe.

    I've had "Charleston English Muffins," which are English muffins topped with Andouille sausage, Shrimp, grits, a poached egg and a rich cheese sauce. I could see sausage gravy being substituted in for the cheese sauce. But, I wouldn't pair a poached egg with sausage gravy on a biscuit. Sounds kinda boring.
     
  3. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Question 1....
    IMO, no. Not Benedict. Thats Bisquits and gravy. With egg.
    Eggs benedict, to me, is toasted english muffin, poached eggs, topped
    with Hollandaise sauce.
    If you change the bread? No. If you change the sauce? No.
    Change the egg? Well IMO, a fried or basted egg, still benedict.
    Scrambled....not so much.

    Question 2.....
    The real question here is would you ever serve gravy on eggs?
    Well sure, poached, fried, scrambled, some like gravy on eggs some dont.
    I personally love sausage gravy on eggs, potatoes, bread, chicken fried
    steak, etc. Versatile stuff.
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2018
  4. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I’d feel better about it being called a Benedict if it had a sausage patty instead of just sausage in the gravy.
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I would enjoy such a dish but don't think it is a Benedict
     
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  6. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Pfflt. I cant believe I forgot the canadian bacon or ham in my post above.
    Thanks for reminding me Brian.
     
  7. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    I guess adding the "Southern" part makes everything okay. I've seen worse interpretations.
     
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  8. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I’ve got only one word: YUM!!!
     
  9. chefross

    chefross

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    There are many kinds of Benedicts, but they all have the same basic items.
    Interchanging the ingredients doesn't give one the right to name it after a classic.

    Sigh....I am always amazed and amused by the names Chef's use haphazardly.
     
  10. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I do think it would be better served if there was a biscuit, topped with a sausage patty, then the egg, and topped with gravy. I’d totally call it a Benedict or a play on the name, Colonel Benedict eggs for example.
     
  11. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Since Arnold was the name of a pig in an old Nick at Nite
    TV show, if you made it with bacon or sausage you could call it Benedict Arnold.

    Chef Ross is right about the name liberties, like the fast food chain
    that slit a chicken breast, slid some ham and cheese in and
    served on a sesame seed bun. The new Chicken Cordon Bleu
    sandwich. Yeah....riiiight.

    Next they'll be calling a bisquit stuffed with roast beef and mushrooms
    a Beef Wellington Sandwhich.
     
  12. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    These things don’t bother me as much as they bother you guys. Probably only because I know how to make the real thing and don’t get confused when it is misused. It does miff me though that some people may never have had a real eggs Benedict and therefore ordering this is not a representative experience of the real thing.
     
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  13. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    I would expect that kind of Benedict served at Denny's. When you said it was a semi upscale restaurant I wouldn't expect that. In most cases you'll see restaurants replace the Meat with Lobster, Crab. Crab cake and so on in costal areas..... ChefBillyB
     
  14. planethoff

    planethoff

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    I just couldn't get past the sausage gravy with poached egg. Textures don't gel IMO. I agree a sausage patty, no gravy and Hollandaise would have been good and could be considered a "Benedict" of sorts. Basically being biscuits with sausage gravy and egg, the name was misleading. Don't get me wrong, Sausage gravy with biscuits and egg is good, but when you are expecting Eggs Benedict, it can be a big disappointment.
     
  15. planethoff

    planethoff

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    From Wikipedia:

    Variations
    [​IMG]
    Eggs Benedict with bacon
    Several variations of Eggs Benedict exist.

    • Eggs Blackstone substitutes streaky bacon for the ham and adds a tomato slice.[6]
    • Eggs Blanchard substitutes Béchamel sauce for Hollandaise.[7]
    • Eggs Florentine substitutes spinach for the ham or adds it underneath.[8] Older versions of eggs Florentine add spinach to poached or shirred eggs.
    • Eggs Chesapeake substitutes a Maryland blue crab cake in place of the ham.[9]
    • Eggs Mornay substitutes Mornay (cheese) sauce for the Hollandaise.[10]
    • Eggs Trivette adds Creole mustard to the Hollandaise and adds a topping of Crayfish.[11]
    • Eggs Omar (also known as a steak benedict) substitutes a small steak in place of the ham, and sometimes replaces the hollandaise with béarnaise.
    • Eggs Atlantic, Eggs Hemingway,[12] or Eggs Norvégienne (also known as Eggs Royale and Eggs Montreal in New Zealand) substitutes salmon or smoked salmon for the ham. This is a common variation found in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the United Kingdom, and in Kosher restaurants that cannot serve bacon or any pork products.[13] This is also known as "Eggs Benjamin" in some restaurants in Canada.[14]
    • Huevos Benedictos substitutes sliced avocado and/or Mexican chorizo for the ham, and is topped with both a salsa (such as salsa roja or salsa brava) and hollandaise sauce.[15]
    • Eggs Hussarde substitutes Holland rusks for the English muffin and adds Bordelaise sauce.[16][17]
    • Irish Benedict replaces the ham with corned beef or Irish bacon.[18]
    • Eggs Cochon, a variation from New Orleans restaurants which replaces the ham with pork "debris" (slow roasted pork shredded in its own juices) and the English muffin with a large buttermilk biscuit.[19][20]
    • Egg McMuffin, a proprietary item on the breakfast menu of the fast-food chain McDonald's, includes Canadian bacon, an egg fried in a circular form with the yolk broken, and a slice of American cheese between two halves of an English muffin. Sauce is omitted, although the muffin is buttered.
     
  16. planethoff

    planethoff

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    New Orleans Eggs Cochon is probably one of my favorite things on earth.
     
  17. kronin323

    kronin323

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    Sorry but this strikes me as a bit of an overreaction. I agree this particular recipe sounds pretty weak but it's not their fault the customer didn't read the description before ordering. I think I once had a version with Southern cream gravy (not sausage) instead of Hollandaise and it wasn't bad.

    And yeah, it can be annoying how some big chains kludge together some ingredients and name it after something it barely resembles but we're not talking Taco Bell here. Surely local businesses should be allowed some tolerance to be creative without people getting hung up on labels.

    Here's some eggs benedict variations I can get from a couple of places within 10 minutes of my house:

    - Tomato, asparagus, poached egg, Hollandaise over house-made crab cakes
    - Smoked salmon, poached egg, marinated red onion, capers, herbed cream cheese, Hollandaise over potato latkes
    - Grilled steak, poached egg, white cheddar, Chipotle sauce, onion, cilantro, Hollandaise over corn tortillas
    - Bacon, fried green tomato, poached egg, avocado, chile con queso over English muffin
    - Fried chicken breast, poached egg, citrus marinated onion, Hollandaise, green chile sauce over homestyle biscuit

    Do these sound like real Benedicts? I don't think so. Is calling them Benedicts the downfall of society? Certainly not.

    Me, I'm more concerned about whether or not they can consistently properly poach an egg...

    Cheers.
     
  18. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I admit to being guilty of committing benedict blasphemy in the past with the following variation

    Tokoyo Benedict
    Definitely a non-traditional benedict; mushi-pan topped with poached eggs, togarishi grilled prawns, drizzled with a wasabi black pepper beurre blanc sauce and topped with a chiffonade of crispy yam and pickled ginger
     
  19. Iceman

    Iceman

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    When it's Your restaurant You write the menu and call dishes anything You want. If there is a description included ... and maybe a picture (Denny's) ... then you're good-to-go and off-the-hook.
     
  20. chefross

    chefross

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    Sorry but none of the delicious sounding dishes above qualify for Eggs Benedict.

    If a kitchen is going to take a classic and re-create it into something different, then it needs to be named something creative as well. What's that phrase....."mimicry is a compliment."
    The classics are there for a reason, and that is to re-create the dish in order to satisfy the need to re-create the dish.