Sous Vide

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by chefmt, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. chefmt

    chefmt

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    I just purchased my first immersion circulator and I have a question. How do I know when the food has reached the desired temp?


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  2. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    The sous vide machine has a temperature control.  You set it and it will hold that temp.
     
  3. dcarch

    dcarch

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    "---How do I know when the food has reached the desired temp?"

    You don't.

    There are charts (Google for them) which estimate the time it takes for temperature to reach set temperature, depending on food thickness.

    However, you know that the temperature can not go above your set temperature, don't matter how long you sous vide your food.

    dcarch
     
  4. chefmt

    chefmt

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    Thanks. I will google it. I just didn't see the need to cook something for 6 hours that reached temp in 4.


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  5. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    I just put a meatloaf in the Water oven, it will be done in three hrs........

     
  6. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    Chef, Welcome to Cheftalk.........Remember, it doesn't say you have to cook for 6 hrs, it just Say's you can. Read, ask questions and understand the method and process, it will help you decide how long something cooks.............take care....ChefBillyB
     
  7. pirate-chef

    pirate-chef

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    my favorite is a special tape you can use on the bags and use a very small probe thermometer you should be able to pierce into the bag to check it.. 
     
  8. notswedishchef

    notswedishchef

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    As others have said, using a thermocouple and the self healing tape will help provide an idea as to internal temp.  Readily available charts (poly sci, google, apps, etc.) are using decent starting points for times, temps, etc.  Google..............seriously, read......try it out, and google some more.  Invest in a solid library of modern books with sous vide in the repatoire. 

    Make NOTES...lots of them....sometimes knowing what doesn't work is as good as knowing.  I have about 2 years of daily circulations logs (HAACP!!) that I've culled into our be all and end all for sous vide.  when we circulate something we reference the logs complete with end result pics and we have a solid point to start to discuss what we're trying to do.
     
  9. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    You can use a hypodermic probe and sealing tape.  I rely on mathematical formulas (reduced to charts since I don't have a PhD in math!).   For stuff like fish and shellfish a probe is probably the way to go if you have the equipment.
     
  10. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    @Phaedrus, care to share the charts? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/wink.gif

    There is also an app that may be helpful: http://www.sousvidedash.com/
     
  11. dcarch

    dcarch

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    You can measure any time if you don't vacuum seal.

    dcarch
     
  12. everydaygourmet

    everydaygourmet

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    @Pirate-chef   what is the "special tape" you refer to, brand etc., have to presume that it is food grade
    @NotSwedishChef  same ? 
     
  13. notswedishchef

    notswedishchef

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    Temperature Probing


    200-470 - Type-K Hypodermic temperature probe for use with digital thermometers
    • Type-K Connector - Plugs into most commercial-grade digital thermometers
    • Easy-to-clean, rugged construction - the armored cable, stainless steel probe and handle can withstand the rigors of even the most demanding commercial kitchen
    • Probe dimensions (L x dia) 4 x .065in / 101.6 x 1.65mm
    300-632 - Closed-cell foam tape for use with Hypodermic temperature probe, .75in x 3ft / 1.9cm x .91m

    above from polysci in reference to the tape.

    available from polysci....jbprince, you name it.

    I use thermoworks for thermocouples, thermapens, and general data gathering tech (PH meters, hydrometers, etc.)

    not vaccuum sealing and extreme long sous vide cook times (not talking about poaching, or general quick cooks) would be a bad idea.  You vacuum for a variety of reasons, not the least of which is to create as anaerobic of an environment as possible to thereby limit bacteria growth.  Hence why.....you generally follow a solid HACCP plan/ procedures for making sure the bag is clean, making sure the product is walk-in temp, sealing, and than cooking....cold, properly handled.......limits bacteria colonization growth in an otherwise rife environment for bacteria reproduction.....

    wrapping stuff in 5 layers of plastic wrap....and cooking something for longer times.........super awful idea.  Using bags (i.e. ziplock) and other materials not designed for higher temps (i.e. boiling or close water).....is also another bad idea. 
     
  14. dcarch

    dcarch

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    The way I understand it, "vacuuming" is not to create a vacuum. There is no vacuum in a "vacuumed" bag. You are simply removing air. Inside the bag after vacuuming, the pressure is the same as outside, if you measure. A vacuumed environment will create about 14 lbs / inch sq pressure. I believe the purpose for remove air is to facilitate thermal conductivity, not for sterilization, because there are dangerous microbes which can grow rapidly in a vacuum environment. 

    If you use a bag without vacuum sealing in hot water (water displacement method), you will find that the water pressure quickly remove all the air inside the bag just the same.

    Yes, very good advice, I agree, use bags that are classified for boiling and keep everything clean.

    dcarch
     
  15. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    We get your point, but we are all in general agreement as to what we're talking about.   You don't have to say that in any thread, and we've been quite generous in allowing you the courtesy of disagreement in the pro forums.
     
  16. dcarch

    dcarch

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    My apologies of posting here.

    When I go to "Recent Discussion" on the bottom of the forum page, I just click on the topic. Is there some way I can tell that a topic is in the "Pro" forum so that I don't make the same mistake again?

    Thanks, and again, sorry.

    dcarch
     
  17. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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  18. dcarch

    dcarch

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    Got it!

    Thanks.

    dcarch
     
  19. pirate-chef

    pirate-chef

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    @ every day not swedish hit it on the head thats exactly what i was talking about.