Sous Vide Question

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Joined Apr 29, 2011

I'm not referring to a home cook or use, the OP was talking about a busy commercial setting. I'm also not saying they are "death machines." It's a tool and can be used properly or improperly, that's all on he person.
I was using the use by home cooks as an example of how they are now mainstream.
 
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Joined Apr 29, 2011
They are familiar with a fryer
Yes all of those items are based on the operator being able to do it correctly. The flip side I would say is most cooks or people working in the industry would already have experience if not at least a basic understanding of using items like a fryer and slicer while probably not SV. The training is just an added consideration for pros and cons.
after they have been trained on them for the first time. They will be familiar with the SV once they have been trained to use it.
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
In your example, I suppose driving for 30 minutes would be "faster" than flying for an hour. Basic math, right? But, what's faster than driving for 30 minutes to my destination?...
...already being there since yesterday. I don't have to drive 30 minutes today because I got all my travel done yesterday. (i.e. I sous vide 500 eggs yesterday so I don't have to poach eggs today) Not having to poach eggs is faster than having to poach eggs, yes?

But you DID travel in that example and you still chose the LONGER method. See? It's eggs were talking about here ,not all SV applications. Like I said before no one here is saying it isn't impossible or that other applications for a braised meat style item wouldn't be beneficial. We are talking about poached eggs for a brunch here. And the fact that you are okay with cooking eggs that far ahead to save some time at the price of quality shows where your mind set is about standards. Why not just cook the whole benedict ahead and save some time, better yet cook and freeze that way you can save even more time, wow possibilities are endless!

Legitimate counterpoints? Lol. You can't make legitimate points about something you don't fully understand. I can try and argue with Stephen Hawking (just an analogy, not comparing myself to SH) about theoretical physics but I won't get very far, because I know next to nothing about it. But yeah, I'm still gonna tell him all the "legitimate" points I made, lol.

This argument doesn't even make any sense, no one has to be a "expert" in a subject to be able to discuss it. The fact that you believe so and any arguments counter to your own opinions are automatically null and void just reinforces what I stated earlier. Talking about Steven Hawking doesn't even make sense in this example because you and Steven are not even in the same professional field. And I would assume some like Hawking would have a better attitude and listen instead of just preach.

A few examples of your guys' "legitimate points"
-putting eggs in bags (not part of the process of SV eggs, which you would know if you've done it before).
-Takes too long (1 hr) to cook an egg during service (you don't SV the eggs during service, it happens well before...which you would know if you've done it before)
-Too much "manpower" (less manpower than paying people to stand over a rondo and poach eggs)
-Unsafe/bacteria farm (easily provable false, I'll say again)
-it's too trendy (SV been around since the 70s, prevalent in kitchens since like 2005)
-logistically cumbersome (only someone who hadn't done that before would say that, because it literally couldn't be easier)
-not 100% safe or 100% free of human error (what professional cooking method reaches that metric? None...zero)

Now who is spreading falsehoods? I never stated that sous vide eggs were exclusively in bags, the only mention to it I said was sous vide will always feel like boil in a bag to me. I never said sous vide eggs were being cooked to order for the hour, merely that cooking them for that long seemed silly since you can poach them to order and have a fresh product. I never said it was too much manpower or that someone is going to be starring at the SV. The unsafe part was based on the points about the issue if the time/temperature was set wrong for the whole cooking time. So yes, if your eggs are set at the wrong temp they could be an issue. Is it going to be an issue every time? No, but to act like it can never happen is just asinine. I never said it was too trendy, only that SOME people can act like total tools about it which you are procing every time you post. It may not be logistically cumbersome for a trained professional who has used it many times, but for someone new or someone in management who has never used it and has to implement it, yeah there are some logistics to consider.

You seem to be unwilling to understand that neither I, nor anyone else I read here stated that it was impossible to use SV as to the OP's post. Only that there are pros and cons to using it, and if YOU would get off your "high horse" about it you would see that there is no substance to your arguments about the actual issues laid out against using SV IN THIS SENARIO. We are not talking about SV for ALL applications here.
 
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774
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Joined Sep 17, 2018


I was using the use by home cooks as an example of how they are now mainstream.
Never said they weren't mainstream, you can find these things everywhere now, and relatively cheap too. I'm talking more about the practical application for one item on a brunch menu.
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
They are familiar with a fryer

after they have been trained on them for the first time. They will be familiar with the SV once they have been trained to use it.

Right and there's nothing wrong with that. From a cook's perspective there may be little downside but from a management perspective, there is extra trainings, supervision, paperwork, etcetera, not to mention with the way turnover is in this industry you will have to continue the cycle over and over. Again there are surely some applications where this may not be an issue or even beneficial, but for the specific question in place, it may not be a good cost/benefit ratio. It is just a counter point to consider, that is all I am saying.
 
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Joined Apr 29, 2011
Anyway I wonder what the OP ended up doing as I think SV eggs could work in their situation. I never realised there was such a divide on using a piece of equipment that has for a lot of professionals become commonplace. Maybe there were chefs arguing about microwaves in 1969 on telex machines. I will say because I’m in Asia I’ve never had to submit a HACCP plan and maybe that might be a deterrent to trying something new. Anyone that I have using one knows how to safely use it. It’s just not for everyone and hopefully jimmer has found a solution to his problem.
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
Anyway I wonder what the OP ended up doing as I think SV eggs could work in their situation. I never realised there was such a divide on using a piece of equipment that has for a lot of professionals become commonplace. Maybe there were chefs arguing about microwaves in 1969 on telex machines. I will say because I’m in Asia I’ve never had to submit a HACCP plan and maybe that might be a deterrent to trying something new. Anyone that I have using one knows how to safely use it. It’s just not for everyone and hopefully jimmer has found a solution to his problem.
I had to look up what a telex machine was lol.
 
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Joined Nov 27, 2012
its useful in certain settings. Most reliable and least labor intensive way to do 500 eggs in one hour if you ask me, also the easiest way of holding em as well. As a lot of you have said its tool useful depending on the circumstances. My two cents would be that poached eggs are not the same as sous vide cooked eggs though. the water being in direct contact with the egg gives it a different texture. Both are nice but certainly different.
 
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Joined Feb 20, 2021
Let's hope so. But, is sous vide really the best solution for poaching eggs? Back in the day when I used to do brunches, we would push through on average 250 to 300 poached eggs per brunch. That's during a brunch that lasted from 11am to 1:30pm. We did it by keeping it simple. A poached egg takes 4 minutes if the eggs are room temperature. So, as part of the prep, we put out the eggs so they could come up to room temp. Next, I would put two people on the eggs. We would poach the eggs in a large saute pan that had a star shaped insert that divided the pan into 8 sections. On busy days, we would have up to 3 of these pans going at once and two people handling the eggs. That's 18 poached eggs every 4 minutes or so, all done to order so there was no holding.

I think you're going to find that the key to a properly poached egg is in the temperature of the water. It has to be a shade under boiling for the egg to cook properly. The yolk and the whites are going to cook at different rates given their differences in density. The hot water ensures that the white, which is mostly water to begin with, cooks as quickly as possible without overcooking the yolk that is insulated by the yolk. By the time the white is thoroughly cooked, the yolk has been heated sufficiently to serve. Et viola!

The relatively low temps used in sous vide are not going to cook the egg properly nor will it solve your time issues. If you increase the temperature of the sous vide to just below boiling, you may as well just poach the eggs in the traditional method.

Cheers! :)
I’m sure that 300 eggs in 2 hours were beautiful .
 
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