Sous Vide Question

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by jeffcaters, Dec 14, 2018.

  1. jeffcaters

    jeffcaters

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    19
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    I own a catering business, so I know my way around a kitchen, but I am not a chef so I figured I would [pose this question here. Sous vide seems so much the rage these days and I even see the average homeowner trying it. I certainly understand the concept of slow cooking at a consistent temperature and I see the benefits for steaks/chops etc. However, I have been slow cooking my roasts (everything from eye of round to prime rib) in my Blodgett slow cooker with GREAT results. I put my roasts in at night at 125 to 130 and by thew time next morning arrives they are perfectly cooked to that temperature with consistent pink from edge to center. Am I missing something that sous vide does better than this method? The results seem to be the same with a lot easier just putting them in an oven!? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. phaedrus

    phaedrus

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    146
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I don't feel like you'd gain anything over your present method. I'm a big fan of sous vide but it's just one tool in the toolbox, not the best tool for everything.
     
  3. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

    Messages:
    612
    Likes Received:
    258
    Exp:
    Chef Emeritus
    The method you are using is actually better than sous vide for big roasts.

    I also do big pieces of meat in a low oven.

    I find that sous vide works best on smaller items.
     
  4. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

    Messages:
    145
    Likes Received:
    48
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    From what little I know of sous vide I think the appeal is that it could be basically left out on the counter, thus freeing up a oven and also that you can add flavorings or aromatics to the bag when you sous vide. But like another said, I don't think it would be practical for a large cut of meat.
     
  5. jeffcaters

    jeffcaters

    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    19
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    Thanks for your input. I kinda thought that but I figured I ask someone who actually used it. Another quick question. Everywhere I have read has the meat being put in a bag. What if you did a few steaks in au jus, or a flavored broth, would that work?
     
  6. Darren Perkell

    Darren Perkell

    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Exp:
    Chef
    Looking to Sous Vide 2 Porterhouse steaks 2” thick any recommendations on how to do so and how to sear (torch or very hot skillet). Thanks for your assistance new to Sous vide
     
  7. phaedrus

    phaedrus

    Messages:
    1,586
    Likes Received:
    146
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    It would work but I don't see a lot of point to it. Meat will release some "broth" as it cooks. You could add a bit of butter if you like. For steaks I keep the time brief for the most part, like an hour or so. I don't salt them til I take them out to sear. You can do 60 minutes at 125 degrees, I wouldn't go much higher than 130. But steaks aren't really the "killer app" for sous vide in my opinion. It works well but you don't really need any special technique, just a very hot broiler, to get a great steak. I reserve sous vide for steaks that are in need of long cooking time to tenderize them. Alternatively it works pretty well if you need to hold the meat to flash cook quickly. An example I can cite is batches of steaks for a special event. I did a bunch of NY strips for Mother's Day; cooked them in 130 degree bath, put the time on the baggie with a sharpie, then cycled them through the circulator. A quick sear and you get a plausible med rare but of course most of them were ordered med through med well. That allowed us to hit 10 minute or less ticket times even with MW.

    Sous vide is also great for fish and chicken.