Sous vide eggs

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Joined Oct 9, 2008
Somehow I had not previously gotten around to doing eggs sous vide until last night. Didn't work, and I'm mystified.

As I understand the discussion in Modernist Cuisine and its home version too, eggs cooked sous vide dial in by temperature. You can leave them a long time, and they don't change: the only real factor is temperature.

I put eggs in and set temp for 158, which they say is soft boiled, fudgy yolks, tender whites. They sat about 4 hours. The whites were a little rubbery, yolks a bit chalky, strong green line around the outside of the yolk.

What the heck?
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
OK I just tried the 75C/167F eggs and I can see this comes with a learning curve.  I used my PID and a pot of water on a hotplate, got the water to 167 and added four eggs fresh from the ice box and started the timer for 13 minutes.  The water temp took a nose dive to 164F and took almost five minutes to recover.  It shot up to 171F so I turned it off and let it coast.  I pulled them at 14 minutes and had 90% perfect yolks and 50% on the whites - too runny for my tastes and so it seems the game is afoot.  Next time I will plan on the temperature drop and see if I can hold at that temp for the duration.  I'm going to do this till I get it right damnit.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
 
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Joined Oct 23, 2008
I've done this and had good results although depending on your personal preference (I do not like ANY runny white) it can be tough. The key really is the +- 1 degree temp. You have a time window to work in that is much larger than would be if you were trying to do soft boiled using boiling water. I am surprised that the eggs over cooked though - that's not how sous vide is supposed to work.. it should never be possible to get past the target temp which is what we use to judge the doneness. The temperature over time can result in undesirable effects like denaturing proteins (becomes mushy) but I have never heard of anything literally over-cooking like you are describing.

Have you tested your sous vide setup with another thermometer?

I'm going to go setup a water bath at 158 and will put an egg from the refrigerator into it for four hours. I'll post pictures of my results. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/bounce.gif  

Edit:
And we're off!!

 
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Joined Oct 23, 2008
Ok.. so we have repeated the process and I ended up with the same Chris. Let me say this.. the whites are barely set... the yolk is over.. This was 4 hours of cook time!

 
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Joined Feb 9, 2014
Somehow I had not previously gotten around to doing eggs sous vide until last night. Didn't work, and I'm mystified.

As I understand the discussion in Modernist Cuisine and its home version too, eggs cooked sous vide dial in by temperature. You can leave them a long time, and they don't change: the only real factor is temperature.

I put eggs in and set temp for 158, which they say is soft boiled, fudgy yolks, tender whites. They sat about 4 hours. The whites were a little rubbery, yolks a bit chalky, strong green line around the outside of the yolk.

What the heck?

From what I remember hearing on Dave Arnold's podcast, the restaurant guys who are using circulators to hold hot eggs cook them up to temp and then hold them at a lower temperature than they cook, I.E. Cook to 68 C to get a poached egg texture and hold at 57 C for service for many hours.

I think the green ring is a sulfur reaction? I guess it must still take place at soft boiling temperatures.
 
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Joined Apr 5, 2007
Canadian here, excuse the metric.  158f is about 70c, that is way too high for super slow cooked eggs unless you want really destroyed yolks.  63-64 c (145ish f) is where you get the fudgy yolk.  Your whites will be loose at this point, however.  73c for about 13 min will get you a firmish white and decent yolk but your timing and cooling has to be spot on or your results will be inconsistant from egg to egg.

I do sv eggs for my brunch services and the method I have come up with for a "perfect" (horses for courses) yolk and a firmer white is to:

Cook eggs in a batch at 63.5c for about an hour and a half.  I add the eggs to the bath when the temp hits 61c and start timing when the temp hits 63.5.   

Remove eggs and store in a large volume of ice water (not just for the rapid cooling, but the floating the eggs helps keep the yolk centered).

For servce: retherm eggs in a 73.5 bath, about 6 min.  This will warm them them through while also just setting the white to  leave it more appealing to most people.  In the event it is a touch too running still, just laddle about 2 tbls of boiling water over the egg before plating.  Or top sauce it, if thats's an option.
 
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