Sous Vide egg pasteurization

315
55
Joined Jan 19, 2014
I've pasteurized hen eggs many times for safer use in raw preparations. 135 degrees for 1.25 hours in the shell followed by an ice bath, and the yolk is completely raw and whites are cloudy and thicker, but still runny. I'm now trying to do the same with duck eggs and the yolks are thickened and whites are just starting to solidify so that to separate, you literally have to peel the jelly like white away from the yellow fragile orb of a yolk. The duck eggs come from a local farm and a variety of ducks so the eggs are as big as a medium to three times that, yet results are basically the same. Any thoughts?
 
2,236
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
From what I understand of your post, i'll venture that in this case, size doesn't matter. it's all about the slow, low temp.
 
315
55
Joined Jan 19, 2014
From what I understand of your post, i'll venture that in this case, size doesn't matter. it's all about the slow, low temp.

Correct. Today I put some chicken eggs in the same 135 degree bath as the considerably larger duck eggs and after an hour and fifteen, the chicken eggs were raw with slightly milky whites and the duck eggs were quite a bit more gelatinous. It's got to be the makeup of the eggs themselves, but I can't find anything anywhere that talks about sous vide pasteurization of duck eggs.
 
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Joined Aug 7, 2013
Should I be pasteurizing eggs I get from a friend with hens? I can't believe that I-of all people-had never had the notion.
Can this be done without a sous vide machine? Damn...
 
315
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Joined Jan 19, 2014
Hi, we do it for any fresh local eggs...(same shoot is used for eggs and poop!) We're doing a fresh egg ducknog for the holidays. Best be safe with any uncooked eggs, especially farm local. Get a cheap immersion circulator like the Annova...135 degrees for 75 minutes makes pasteurized raw eggs. I've seen priced at $140 to as low as $70. Well worth it at either price, great results for so many uses.
 

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