Sous Vide cooking

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by dagger, Jul 21, 2018.

  1. dagger

    dagger

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    Well since heat goes from the outside of the shell and works inward I can do that by adjusting time and temp.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    And sous vide is just a tool to finely manage that technique more easily and precisely.
     
  3. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    I am constantly amazed when I read discussions regarding SV cooking. The "boil in bag" comment always seems to come up as does the "it takes so long". argument. Both miss the point of SV cooking. The post about cooking eggs to different degrees of doneness is pretty much right on and the way to explain SV to those who don't know what it does. It does not replace anything IMHO. It is another tool that in some cases can allow you to do things that require precise temperature control that you would not otherwise be able to do repeatedly and consistently. Dagger's comment about "temp moving from the outside to the inside" pretty much answers their own question. True, heat does travel from the outside of an object to the inside and the heat used to cook an item is almost always significantly higher than the final temp of that item. The outside is usually at a higher than desired temp be the time the inside hits the target temp. What if you could make the entire item, a steak for example, exactly 131*F from edge to edge with no chance of overcooking? Wouldn't that be a more consistent and precise way to cook? Also, you can seal in flavors, herbs, etc in the bag and not loose that flavor to cooking water, steam, etc. I have been using SV for about 5 years now and I use them 3-5 times per week.
     
  4. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    Oh yes!!!! I can do duck confit and only use a very small amount of duck fat. I may use a few tablespoons of fat per bag. Once cooked and plunged into an ice bath a nice case of fat is formed and you can keep these in the fridge for weeks. Just pop them back in a 140*F bath for 10 minutes and you are good to go.
     
  5. rick alan

    rick alan

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    How did you set this up, put the pot into the SV tub?
     
  6. mike9

    mike9

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    Nope I have a DSV controller from DorkFood that has a probe and a control unit. Pot on the hot plate, hot plate plugged into the DSV the DSV plugged into the outlet. Set your temp and you're good to go. I put kling wrap on the pot to kill evaporation. You need to find the sweet spot on the hot plate - I have mine marked now so it's a no brainer. Being able to control your temp from the pot contents is great for stuff like this. Afterward I remove bones, veg, etc., then let chill overnight. Next day I skim any fat (usually very little) then ladle the broth into bags for the freezer. Because it never boils it makes for a very clear broth that is highly nutritious and very tasty. I drink it by the cup.

    I think I paid $100 for it maybe three, or four years ago.
     
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I have used a crock pot here, if I where a little more careful I believe I could prevent all boiling, but I always screw up a little. Nothing so clear as yours. 13 hours for chicken bones and they are essentially mush, all cartilage dissolved. I also used this in a dietary way, aimed at lowering inflammation.
     
  8. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    We're drifting off topic, but I should mention that you can get the same bone stock effect with a pressure cooker, much faster. The clarity is because it doesn't roil. The destroyed bone effect is just the collagen turning to gelatin and melting, which effect is simply a gradient of temperature and time; I vaguely recall that the transformation begins somewhere around 150F.

    When I do a turkey, the carcass becomes ridiculously gelatinous after 3 hours in the pressure cooker. If you really want to do it up, do half the carcass one day, strain and chill, then do the other half in the strained stock. The results chill hard enough to chew.
     
  9. dagger

    dagger

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    Can't boil water
    of course I never cooked this way so only reference I have is what I seen on You Tube. I saw face off videos and don't see any reason for me to adopt this method over a pressure cooker. The results were pretty much the same with very little differences that I'm sure can be achieved by simply adjusting time and or temp. Thanks for all the input but still boiling bags to me just low and slow, simmering water.
     
  10. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    I have and use a pressure cooker and I use SV as well. They both produce food, that is about the only thing they have in common.
     
  11. someday

    someday

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    I think they are trolling because there is no way someone could be so dense, especially after reading this thread, that they would think pressure cookers and sous vide have much in common.
     
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  12. tatnall

    tatnall

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    I use both often as well--for totally different things. I could certainly live without them but they make my life easier and yummier. I
     
  13. osamaru

    osamaru

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    Sous vide Chicken in Salsa is amazing.
     
  14. oober

    oober

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    I actually signed up just because of this topic... Little back story.

    I love going down the youtube rabbit hole when it comes to trying new cooking techniques. I saw the sous vide method. I thought to myself, hmm, let's test it out.

    I did not have a sous vide stick yet because I need to verify stuff on my own 1st, so I used a crock pot and a thermometer (which was a true pain in the arse) to try a steak vs the normal way I cook a steak.

    My inaccurate sous vide test won on the taste test.

    I then did a test with chicken breast, inaccurate souse vide vs normal cooking. Sous vide won again.

    Just so there is no misunderstanding.

    Sous vide means keeping the protein at a certain temp for a certain time then sear on the grill for color and bark.

    Regular cooking mean grilling at a high temp to sear then cooking low until done.

    I was hooked. Sous vide won by a landslide

    I bought a stick..

    I decided I was going to try making deli roast beef (9$ a lb normally for good stuff) using top/bottom round... I cooked a 5 lb roast for 10hrs seared on a 550 deg grill, cooled in fridge for 24hrs. End result, the best deli roast beef I have ever tasted.

    I then took it one step further. I took the deli roast beef, and with a temp controlled au jus (135 deg) made the best Italian beef I have ever tasted. Melt in your mouth Italian beef, absolutely amazing...

    So ya. I look for more opportunities to sous vide. This weekend I am going to do a test of steamed then glazed carrots vs sous vide then glazed carrots...

    Thanks all, great site.
     
  15. ivanthetrble

    ivanthetrble

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    I have done similar side by side testing. Taking a piece of protein, cutting it into 2-3 pieces, and cook/sear with various methods. SV does tend to win a lot of these tests. I plate it up, with me being the only one who knows which was prepared with which method. I have found a few things that I don't think it works great for but overall I love it. Veggies are amazing! Put a little honey and thyme in the bag with the carrots. Yum!
     
  16. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Last night I had people over. I seasoned and rolled a boneless leg of lamb (actually deboned it first), sealed it in a bag, and dropped it in a SV rig at 136. After 2 hours I could have pulled it, but by then my guests were hanging out enjoying themselves. When it seemed like it should be dinner time, I pulled it, dried it, and seared the outside in a pan until golden. It had been in the bath 3.5 hours. SV allowed the meat to wait for me, instead of having to decide when to have dinner based on the meat.
     
    oober likes this.