Sourdough Starter Recipe

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Joined Nov 20, 2000
Okay as I said before, even with all my vast culinary experience ( :rolleyes: ) I have never made a sourdough bread, nor a starter.
Now I can go to a library or do an internet search and come up with a thousand recipes for starters, and yes I realize that scientifically speaking they're all the same. However I trust this group above all others to give me the tried and true.
So I beg of you to indulge me with one of your starter recipes that make a "true" sour experience.

Now bear in mind that, my mind ain't what it used to be so it may take awhile to get around to. But I will let you know eventually the results.
I thank you in advance.

Chrose the baker :D
 
2,550
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Joined Mar 13, 2001
Welcome to the club, Chrose! :)

What kind of starter are you looking for? I have used Nancy Silverton's method, using red grapes, flour and water. Are you interested in that or did you have something else in mind?

BTW, you might want to visit Kyle's kitchen where he has step by step instructions.

Good luck and keep us posted.
 
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I just noticed your signature as "Chrose the Baker".

I know you meant that as a joke. Thanks for the chuckles :lol:

P.S. Cape might want to share with you his recipe where he uses black grapes...
 
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Joined Dec 4, 2001
I've never made sour dough either. Mostly 'cause I don't much like the stuff :look:
Also, I took a look at a barm (starter) recipe and it put me right off the idea. So much time and effort for a bread I don't even like? No thanks :rolleyes:

Jock
 
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
Thanks for the plug Kimmie :) The Barm Commentary and Starter on my site are from Crust & Crumb by Peter Reinhart and have been posted with his permission. It's a five day process thats pretty painless.
 
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Joined Aug 4, 2000
Since I haven't the patience to deal with starters I use a preferment. What's required is mixing 1/2 the water with a pinch of yeast and 1/3 the total amount of flour. Let set for up to 48 hours before mixing with the remainder of flour and water. The preferment will smell beery as opposed to sour like clear vinegar.

Try the preferment approach; you might well be pleased.
 
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Joined Nov 20, 2000
Kimmie, I'm glad my incompetance amuses you! :D
No seriously I have always had an ability to bake a very nice bread. Just never went to the effort of sourdough. So all I am actually looking for is a starter that someone actually has experience with and can say that yes, if you follow this recipe you will get a GOOD sourdough bread. So it makes no never mind to me who's it is as long as you can vouch for it. And yes I will visit Kyles site. I knew someone had one I just couldn't find it on my favorites list. (Sorry 'bout that Kyle) I'll go do it now.

Chrose the Sour Baker :chef: :eek: :D
 
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Joined Mar 4, 2000
I have only used N. Silverton's recipe, once using red grapes, and once with green. They both work beautifully. If you ever come down this way, chrose, I'll bake you some. Maybe that'll get you down here.:)
 
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
I too have endured the 14 Day Torture Fest that is Chef Silverton's grape starter quest. I think it's a sure way to make sure that chrose never strays from the path of commercial yeast again :) It C&C method takes 5 days. The one in Bread Baker's Apprentice takes the same five days and usues only flour and water. No grapes, no raisins, no honey, no nuthin'!
 
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Some of the recipes in her book are awesome. I'm just not sure the starter is one of them. I did the C&C and La Brea starters simultaneosly. One took 5 days and the other 2 weeks. I didn't notice any appreciable difference. Sorry:eek:
 
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My pleasure KyleW!

Chrose,

It all boils down to how much time and patience you have!

14 days = Silverton
5 days = Reinhart

I honestly can't praise Reinhart as I haven't tested his starter. But Silverton's, I have and it worked for me.
 
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Joined Nov 8, 2002
Hi, I read this thread with great interest.
A couple weeks ago I started a wild yeart culture from Maggie Glezer's book, "Artisan Baking Across America." It's a firm chef-type starter that begins with dark rye flour and water.
It started off well, but after more than a couple weeks I can only get it to double every 12 hours after being refreshed. She said it should be quadrupling before use.

Has anyone tried this starter? I wonder what I did wrong.

David
 
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Joined Aug 14, 2000
I have not built her starter from scratch. I have converted mine to hers. I have never had much luck in the quadrupling area either, but the breads in her book all bake up beautifully none the less. I do know that rye starters tend to be much more active than wheat starters. THeir growth tends to be much more explosive.
 
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Joined Nov 16, 2013
I have started baking my own sourdough spelt bread and manage my own starter, which I made using the described method from Breadtopia.com. It's a simple spelt flour/ water starter, which is kept in the fridge and a day before preparing the dough is taken on the counter and fed in three intervals with equal amounts of flour and water as the starter.(by weight)  It gives a large  fresh starter amount, leftovers are baked into sourdough pancakes. Before you need to take away 1/4 cup to keep as original 'mother' starter in the fridge again. It can be fed with the fresh starter after one is done making the doughs. I bake in a covered clay baker and the breads turn out heavenly every time.
 

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