Sour Cream in Pie Dough

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Joined Jan 9, 2004
So I was baking some butter tart(lettes) the other day for Christmas.  I have a standard pie dough recipe I use that works just fine.  But I had some sour cream lying around that I wanted to use up.  So I added it to my recipe and cut back on the water.  Of course, everything worked out great.  The dough rolled out beautifully.  The difference came when I baked the  tart(lettes) off.

Normally what works for me is 425*F for 10 min then turn the oven down to 350* for 5 min.  However, with the sour cream pastry, the first tray was border line over cooked.  Useable, but quite dark.  The second tray I lowered the temperature and baked them off at 400*F for 10 min then 350* for 5 min.  They turned out exactly what I normally get when I use my standard pie dough recipe.

Which got me to wondering.  Why does adding sour cream to the recipe affect the baking temperature so much?   I suspect it might be because of the higher fat content and less water, but does anyone have any other suggestions?
 
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Joined Sep 2, 2014
I'd agree on you deduction of the fat conten. As sour cream has about 60g more fat content per cup than butter. Can't explain the science behind it except I think with the higher fat content it heats easier/faster. My guess. I like cream cheese in some doughs of similar use.
 
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Joined Oct 10, 2005
I'd agree on you deduction of the fat conten. As sour cream has about 60g more fat content per cup than butter. .

Huh?

Read the labels, butter is usually around 82%butterfat, sour cream is anywhere from 14-25% butterfat.
 
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Joined Sep 2, 2014
Wow that was dumb. My statement was completely backwards. Thanx foodpump your right it's butter that's higher. That's what I get for posting after a long day LOL
 
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Joined Aug 4, 2000
.....Which got me to wondering.  Why does adding sour cream to the recipe affect the baking temperature so much?   I suspect it might be because of the higher fat content and less water, but does anyone have any other suggestions?
Then your dough was made using "more moisture" and much less fat.  It was bound to bake differently.  But how was the flakeyness?  About the same as with your standard recipe?
 
15
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Joined Jan 9, 2004
If I replaced the water with 14% bf sour cream, wouldn't I have less moisture and more fat?

Anyways, the dough was a lot softer than regular pie dough and a lot more malleable, which made fitting it into those mini tart(lette) forms a heck of a lot easier. 
 

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